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Livestream from Silicon Flatirons on ‘Internet Platforms’ Rising Dominance, Evolving Governance’

Drew Clark

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From the University of Colorado’s Silicon Flatirons Program on “Internet Platforms’ Rising Dominance, Evolving Governance”:

  • We are living in the era of the internet platform.  From Apple’s app store to Google’s search and Chrome browser to Facebook to Amazon to broadband internet access, internet users depend on platforms that both enable and restrict their freedom.  As these platforms exercise more influence on culture, commerce, and democracy, there are increasing questions about what forms of governance will oversee decisions on when information should be taken down, when certain applications are disfavored or preferred, and when and how user’s private information is stored and used.
  • In light of the rise of internet platforms, different governance strategies have emerged, including the use of “soft law,” best practices, and government nudges.  It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that with growing importance of these platforms, public policymakers will increase asking questions about their practices and what form of oversight is appropriate (as opposed to no oversight at all).   The dominance and power of a few platforms, and their reliance on undisclosed algorithms, raises issues of fairness, transparency, and discrimination.
  • In this annual technology policy conference, we will explore emerging forms of governance of platforms, evaluating the appropriate strategies for overseeing internet platforms.  Possible models of governance can include traditional legal oversight (say, the notice and takedown regime of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act), the application of antitrust law to internet companies (say, the European Union’s actions against Google), non-traditional forms of regulation (say, NIST’s Framework for cybersecurity or BITAG’s development of best practices), and company-specific governance policies (say, Twitter’s policies for when to take down tweets).  In evaluating the range of models of governance and emerging principles for platform regulation, we will bring together leaders in academia, government, and private industry to ask what we have learned about the internet platform-based economy.

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Social Media

Josh Hawley Wants To Break Up Big Tech And Revisit How Antitrust Matters Are Considered

Senator Josh Hawley talks Section 230, antitrust reform, and the Capitol riots.

Benjamin Kahn

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on

Josh Hawley, right, via Flickr

From the University of Colorado’s Silicon Flatirons Program on “Internet Platforms’ Rising Dominance, Evolving Governance”:

  • We are living in the era of the internet platform.  From Apple’s app store to Google’s search and Chrome browser to Facebook to Amazon to broadband internet access, internet users depend on platforms that both enable and restrict their freedom.  As these platforms exercise more influence on culture, commerce, and democracy, there are increasing questions about what forms of governance will oversee decisions on when information should be taken down, when certain applications are disfavored or preferred, and when and how user’s private information is stored and used.
  • In light of the rise of internet platforms, different governance strategies have emerged, including the use of “soft law,” best practices, and government nudges.  It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that with growing importance of these platforms, public policymakers will increase asking questions about their practices and what form of oversight is appropriate (as opposed to no oversight at all).   The dominance and power of a few platforms, and their reliance on undisclosed algorithms, raises issues of fairness, transparency, and discrimination.
  • In this annual technology policy conference, we will explore emerging forms of governance of platforms, evaluating the appropriate strategies for overseeing internet platforms.  Possible models of governance can include traditional legal oversight (say, the notice and takedown regime of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act), the application of antitrust law to internet companies (say, the European Union’s actions against Google), non-traditional forms of regulation (say, NIST’s Framework for cybersecurity or BITAG’s development of best practices), and company-specific governance policies (say, Twitter’s policies for when to take down tweets).  In evaluating the range of models of governance and emerging principles for platform regulation, we will bring together leaders in academia, government, and private industry to ask what we have learned about the internet platform-based economy.

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Social Media

Oversight Board Upholds Trump’s Ban From Facebook

The Oversight Board has sent the decision back to Facebook management, criticizing it for setting a “standardless” penalty.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

From the University of Colorado’s Silicon Flatirons Program on “Internet Platforms’ Rising Dominance, Evolving Governance”:

  • We are living in the era of the internet platform.  From Apple’s app store to Google’s search and Chrome browser to Facebook to Amazon to broadband internet access, internet users depend on platforms that both enable and restrict their freedom.  As these platforms exercise more influence on culture, commerce, and democracy, there are increasing questions about what forms of governance will oversee decisions on when information should be taken down, when certain applications are disfavored or preferred, and when and how user’s private information is stored and used.
  • In light of the rise of internet platforms, different governance strategies have emerged, including the use of “soft law,” best practices, and government nudges.  It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that with growing importance of these platforms, public policymakers will increase asking questions about their practices and what form of oversight is appropriate (as opposed to no oversight at all).   The dominance and power of a few platforms, and their reliance on undisclosed algorithms, raises issues of fairness, transparency, and discrimination.
  • In this annual technology policy conference, we will explore emerging forms of governance of platforms, evaluating the appropriate strategies for overseeing internet platforms.  Possible models of governance can include traditional legal oversight (say, the notice and takedown regime of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act), the application of antitrust law to internet companies (say, the European Union’s actions against Google), non-traditional forms of regulation (say, NIST’s Framework for cybersecurity or BITAG’s development of best practices), and company-specific governance policies (say, Twitter’s policies for when to take down tweets).  In evaluating the range of models of governance and emerging principles for platform regulation, we will bring together leaders in academia, government, and private industry to ask what we have learned about the internet platform-based economy.

Continue Reading

Big Tech

Lina Khan Pitches Ideas For Regulating Big Tech In Nomination Hearing

Senate Commerce Committee considers nominations for Lina Khan, Bill Nelson and Leslie Kiernan.

Tim White

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on

Screenshot of Lina Khan at Senate hearing

From the University of Colorado’s Silicon Flatirons Program on “Internet Platforms’ Rising Dominance, Evolving Governance”:

  • We are living in the era of the internet platform.  From Apple’s app store to Google’s search and Chrome browser to Facebook to Amazon to broadband internet access, internet users depend on platforms that both enable and restrict their freedom.  As these platforms exercise more influence on culture, commerce, and democracy, there are increasing questions about what forms of governance will oversee decisions on when information should be taken down, when certain applications are disfavored or preferred, and when and how user’s private information is stored and used.
  • In light of the rise of internet platforms, different governance strategies have emerged, including the use of “soft law,” best practices, and government nudges.  It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that with growing importance of these platforms, public policymakers will increase asking questions about their practices and what form of oversight is appropriate (as opposed to no oversight at all).   The dominance and power of a few platforms, and their reliance on undisclosed algorithms, raises issues of fairness, transparency, and discrimination.
  • In this annual technology policy conference, we will explore emerging forms of governance of platforms, evaluating the appropriate strategies for overseeing internet platforms.  Possible models of governance can include traditional legal oversight (say, the notice and takedown regime of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act), the application of antitrust law to internet companies (say, the European Union’s actions against Google), non-traditional forms of regulation (say, NIST’s Framework for cybersecurity or BITAG’s development of best practices), and company-specific governance policies (say, Twitter’s policies for when to take down tweets).  In evaluating the range of models of governance and emerging principles for platform regulation, we will bring together leaders in academia, government, and private industry to ask what we have learned about the internet platform-based economy.

Continue Reading

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