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The Rural Broadband Moment at the Broadband Communities Summit in Austin

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February 14, 2019 – Americans love broadband. More accurately, they hate it when they can’t get access to high-speed internet.

Right now, Rural America faces a huge crisis, and it isn’t getting better.

According to a report, the “American Broadband Initiative,” released yesterday by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, Rural America is woefully behind the rest of the country on broadband access.

Only 2 percent of Americans in cities lack access to broadband, as currently defined by the Federal Communications Commission — 25 Megabits per second download, 3 Megabits per second upload.

The comparable number for residents of Rural America is that 30 percent lack access to broadband.

The numbers are also bad on mobile deployment: 90.5 percent of Americans living in urban areas have access to fourth-generation LTE services, whereas only 70 percent of rural Americans enjoy that option.

What can we do about this?

Unfortunately, there isn’t one single silver bullet solution. Money is one important component. So is state-wide interest, often in the form of a state broadband office, or a state broadband plan. Education on how to bring broadband, and how to more effectively make use of it, are also a component.

The Rural Telecommunications Congress, a 20-year-old grassroots organization devoting to advocating for better broadband in Rural America, sees all of these approaches as vital.

I have the great privilege of serving as the President of the RTC, which has a long and storied history of calling attention to this issue, demanding better broadband for all Americans, and incubating creative solutions.

And, as we approach the RTC’s annual conference, jointly with the Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, from Tuesday, April 9 to Thursday, April 11, we agree that it’s time to get serious about solving our Rural Broadband crises.

Sign up now to attend all aspects of the Broadband Communities Summit, including the Rural Telecommunications Congress, at $410.00, the cheapest rate available for those who are not government officials or public representatives. See you in Austin!

To sign up at the Rural Telecommunications Congress rate, register below, or at https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=2461240 (Make sure to select “CODE HOLDERS” radio button and use VIP Code RTC410)

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Digital Inclusion

Digital Equity Includes Clear Messaging And Training, Experts Argue

Experts argued for clearer communications and training for Americans not used to connectivity.

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Hannah Hill of Boston Consulting Group

February 14, 2019 – Americans love broadband. More accurately, they hate it when they can’t get access to high-speed internet.

Right now, Rural America faces a huge crisis, and it isn’t getting better.

According to a report, the “American Broadband Initiative,” released yesterday by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, Rural America is woefully behind the rest of the country on broadband access.

Only 2 percent of Americans in cities lack access to broadband, as currently defined by the Federal Communications Commission — 25 Megabits per second download, 3 Megabits per second upload.

The comparable number for residents of Rural America is that 30 percent lack access to broadband.

The numbers are also bad on mobile deployment: 90.5 percent of Americans living in urban areas have access to fourth-generation LTE services, whereas only 70 percent of rural Americans enjoy that option.

What can we do about this?

Unfortunately, there isn’t one single silver bullet solution. Money is one important component. So is state-wide interest, often in the form of a state broadband office, or a state broadband plan. Education on how to bring broadband, and how to more effectively make use of it, are also a component.

The Rural Telecommunications Congress, a 20-year-old grassroots organization devoting to advocating for better broadband in Rural America, sees all of these approaches as vital.

I have the great privilege of serving as the President of the RTC, which has a long and storied history of calling attention to this issue, demanding better broadband for all Americans, and incubating creative solutions.

And, as we approach the RTC’s annual conference, jointly with the Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, from Tuesday, April 9 to Thursday, April 11, we agree that it’s time to get serious about solving our Rural Broadband crises.

Sign up now to attend all aspects of the Broadband Communities Summit, including the Rural Telecommunications Congress, at $410.00, the cheapest rate available for those who are not government officials or public representatives. See you in Austin!

To sign up at the Rural Telecommunications Congress rate, register below, or at https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=2461240 (Make sure to select “CODE HOLDERS” radio button and use VIP Code RTC410)

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Education

Facebook and Utah Valley University Fund Tech Training Program for Utah Elementary Schools

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Photo of a Forbes Elementary School student courtesy UVU

February 14, 2019 – Americans love broadband. More accurately, they hate it when they can’t get access to high-speed internet.

Right now, Rural America faces a huge crisis, and it isn’t getting better.

According to a report, the “American Broadband Initiative,” released yesterday by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, Rural America is woefully behind the rest of the country on broadband access.

Only 2 percent of Americans in cities lack access to broadband, as currently defined by the Federal Communications Commission — 25 Megabits per second download, 3 Megabits per second upload.

The comparable number for residents of Rural America is that 30 percent lack access to broadband.

The numbers are also bad on mobile deployment: 90.5 percent of Americans living in urban areas have access to fourth-generation LTE services, whereas only 70 percent of rural Americans enjoy that option.

What can we do about this?

Unfortunately, there isn’t one single silver bullet solution. Money is one important component. So is state-wide interest, often in the form of a state broadband office, or a state broadband plan. Education on how to bring broadband, and how to more effectively make use of it, are also a component.

The Rural Telecommunications Congress, a 20-year-old grassroots organization devoting to advocating for better broadband in Rural America, sees all of these approaches as vital.

I have the great privilege of serving as the President of the RTC, which has a long and storied history of calling attention to this issue, demanding better broadband for all Americans, and incubating creative solutions.

And, as we approach the RTC’s annual conference, jointly with the Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, from Tuesday, April 9 to Thursday, April 11, we agree that it’s time to get serious about solving our Rural Broadband crises.

Sign up now to attend all aspects of the Broadband Communities Summit, including the Rural Telecommunications Congress, at $410.00, the cheapest rate available for those who are not government officials or public representatives. See you in Austin!

To sign up at the Rural Telecommunications Congress rate, register below, or at https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=2461240 (Make sure to select “CODE HOLDERS” radio button and use VIP Code RTC410)

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Health

Healthcare Startup, Boosted By Pandemic, Wants To Alleviate Fears Before And After Surgery

PatientPartner, which helps surgery patients connect with each other, is seeing rapid growth during the pandemic.

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PatientPartner founders George Kramb and Patrick Frank

February 14, 2019 – Americans love broadband. More accurately, they hate it when they can’t get access to high-speed internet.

Right now, Rural America faces a huge crisis, and it isn’t getting better.

According to a report, the “American Broadband Initiative,” released yesterday by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, Rural America is woefully behind the rest of the country on broadband access.

Only 2 percent of Americans in cities lack access to broadband, as currently defined by the Federal Communications Commission — 25 Megabits per second download, 3 Megabits per second upload.

The comparable number for residents of Rural America is that 30 percent lack access to broadband.

The numbers are also bad on mobile deployment: 90.5 percent of Americans living in urban areas have access to fourth-generation LTE services, whereas only 70 percent of rural Americans enjoy that option.

What can we do about this?

Unfortunately, there isn’t one single silver bullet solution. Money is one important component. So is state-wide interest, often in the form of a state broadband office, or a state broadband plan. Education on how to bring broadband, and how to more effectively make use of it, are also a component.

The Rural Telecommunications Congress, a 20-year-old grassroots organization devoting to advocating for better broadband in Rural America, sees all of these approaches as vital.

I have the great privilege of serving as the President of the RTC, which has a long and storied history of calling attention to this issue, demanding better broadband for all Americans, and incubating creative solutions.

And, as we approach the RTC’s annual conference, jointly with the Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, from Tuesday, April 9 to Thursday, April 11, we agree that it’s time to get serious about solving our Rural Broadband crises.

Sign up now to attend all aspects of the Broadband Communities Summit, including the Rural Telecommunications Congress, at $410.00, the cheapest rate available for those who are not government officials or public representatives. See you in Austin!

To sign up at the Rural Telecommunications Congress rate, register below, or at https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=2461240 (Make sure to select “CODE HOLDERS” radio button and use VIP Code RTC410)

Continue Reading

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