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Mozilla’s Internet Health Report Explores the Power of Cities in Addressing Net Neutrality

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: Mozilla’s recently-released “Internet Health Report” is a fascinating look at the politics and technology behind our contemporary broadband nettworks. This story, on the “Power of Cities,” highlights the role of grass-roots activism in response to the Federal Communications Commission’s decision, in December 2017, to lift Obama-era net neutrality rules.

Spotlight: The power of cities, from Mozilla’s Internet Health Report:

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States backed away from protecting net neutrality in 2018, a network of city mayors formed to use their combined purchasing power to support internet providers who continued upholding net neutrality.

“In NYC alone, we spend over $600 million annually to provide internet service to city employees and to offer city services. So, we convened an ad hoc coalition, starting with eight cities committed to only purchasing from broadband providers that honor net neutrality principles. Now, this coalition is over 130 cities,” says Max Sevilia, the Director of External Affairs for the NYC Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer.

This story and many others are highlighted in a publication called the New York City Internet Health Report. Its creator, Meghan McDermott, adapted the format of the global Internet Health Report as part of a Mozilla fellowship project to explore among other things how cities can be strong advocates for digital rights by nurturing relationships with civic tech communities.

[more…]

Source: Spotlight: The power of cities — The Internet Health Report 2019 — The Internet Health Report 2019

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Broadband Roundup

Infrastructure Bill Gets Agreement, Fiber Connect Wraps Up, Washington Community Broadband

White House announced infrastructure bill to include $65B, Fiber Connect 2021 wraps up, Washington State community broadband bill becomes law.

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: Mozilla’s recently-released “Internet Health Report” is a fascinating look at the politics and technology behind our contemporary broadband nettworks. This story, on the “Power of Cities,” highlights the role of grass-roots activism in response to the Federal Communications Commission’s decision, in December 2017, to lift Obama-era net neutrality rules.

Spotlight: The power of cities, from Mozilla’s Internet Health Report:

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States backed away from protecting net neutrality in 2018, a network of city mayors formed to use their combined purchasing power to support internet providers who continued upholding net neutrality.

“In NYC alone, we spend over $600 million annually to provide internet service to city employees and to offer city services. So, we convened an ad hoc coalition, starting with eight cities committed to only purchasing from broadband providers that honor net neutrality principles. Now, this coalition is over 130 cities,” says Max Sevilia, the Director of External Affairs for the NYC Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer.

This story and many others are highlighted in a publication called the New York City Internet Health Report. Its creator, Meghan McDermott, adapted the format of the global Internet Health Report as part of a Mozilla fellowship project to explore among other things how cities can be strong advocates for digital rights by nurturing relationships with civic tech communities.

[more…]

Source: Spotlight: The power of cities — The Internet Health Report 2019 — The Internet Health Report 2019

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Broadband Roundup

FCC Says 4M on Emergency Broadband Benefit, Ritter Puts $12M in Arkansas, New STL Cabling Product

$3.2-billion program has 4 million households, Ritter to connect 100% in river valley, STL efficient cables.

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Ritter Communications CEO Alan Morse, left.

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: Mozilla’s recently-released “Internet Health Report” is a fascinating look at the politics and technology behind our contemporary broadband nettworks. This story, on the “Power of Cities,” highlights the role of grass-roots activism in response to the Federal Communications Commission’s decision, in December 2017, to lift Obama-era net neutrality rules.

Spotlight: The power of cities, from Mozilla’s Internet Health Report:

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States backed away from protecting net neutrality in 2018, a network of city mayors formed to use their combined purchasing power to support internet providers who continued upholding net neutrality.

“In NYC alone, we spend over $600 million annually to provide internet service to city employees and to offer city services. So, we convened an ad hoc coalition, starting with eight cities committed to only purchasing from broadband providers that honor net neutrality principles. Now, this coalition is over 130 cities,” says Max Sevilia, the Director of External Affairs for the NYC Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer.

This story and many others are highlighted in a publication called the New York City Internet Health Report. Its creator, Meghan McDermott, adapted the format of the global Internet Health Report as part of a Mozilla fellowship project to explore among other things how cities can be strong advocates for digital rights by nurturing relationships with civic tech communities.

[more…]

Source: Spotlight: The power of cities — The Internet Health Report 2019 — The Internet Health Report 2019

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Broadband Roundup

New York Drops $15 Internet, Lumen Gets Army Contract, Illinois Signs Telehealth Bill

New York drops $15 internet after interim court decision, Lumen gets army contract for broadband, Illinois allows telehealth for all.

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: Mozilla’s recently-released “Internet Health Report” is a fascinating look at the politics and technology behind our contemporary broadband nettworks. This story, on the “Power of Cities,” highlights the role of grass-roots activism in response to the Federal Communications Commission’s decision, in December 2017, to lift Obama-era net neutrality rules.

Spotlight: The power of cities, from Mozilla’s Internet Health Report:

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States backed away from protecting net neutrality in 2018, a network of city mayors formed to use their combined purchasing power to support internet providers who continued upholding net neutrality.

“In NYC alone, we spend over $600 million annually to provide internet service to city employees and to offer city services. So, we convened an ad hoc coalition, starting with eight cities committed to only purchasing from broadband providers that honor net neutrality principles. Now, this coalition is over 130 cities,” says Max Sevilia, the Director of External Affairs for the NYC Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer.

This story and many others are highlighted in a publication called the New York City Internet Health Report. Its creator, Meghan McDermott, adapted the format of the global Internet Health Report as part of a Mozilla fellowship project to explore among other things how cities can be strong advocates for digital rights by nurturing relationships with civic tech communities.

[more…]

Source: Spotlight: The power of cities — The Internet Health Report 2019 — The Internet Health Report 2019

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