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New America Highlights the Broadband Prices Available on Ammon, Idaho’s Open Access Network

Adrienne Patton

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Image courtesy New America

The Open Technology Institute of New America on Wednesday released a blog post focusing on Ammon, Idaho, and highlighted how the open access broadband networks there better meets customers’ needs and expectations that most vertically-integrated broadband networks.

In comparing broadband prices globally, a 2014 study by OTI on the cost of connectivity report found that U.S. residents paid more for broadband internet service than their counterparts in Asia or Europe.

The study stated “most U.S. cities lag behind European and Asian cities in our sample in terms of what consumers pay for 25 Mbps of service, and what consumers can get for $50.”

OTI, a tech “do tank” in the midst of the New America think tank, highlighted the Ammon experience in lights of its cost of connectivity report from six years ago.

Collaborating on a local level with government and stakeholders, Ammon leaders found “a local solution to a local problem,” wrote Becky Chao and Lukas Pietrzak in the blog post.

A rural, southeastern city in Idaho, Ammon is a costly investment for private internet providers. However, “[Ammon] created its own fiber optic network, which now serves the government, businesses, and residents, transforming Ammon into one of the most affordable broadband markets in the country.”

Their design eliminated infrastructure deployment costs for service providers, making their city a market-friendly broadband hotspot. Additionally, Ammon’s network saves the city $70,000 yearly, and is estimated to save $43.6 million in 25 years.

Now Ammon residents can choose from 18 different broadband providers and a range of affordable prices, some of which include CenturyLink, DirectCom, FyberCom, or SpeedConnect.

Ammon has a web portal that easily helps customers navigate through internet provider subscriptions.

Adrienne Patton was a Reporter for Broadband Breakfast. She studied English rhetoric and writing at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. She grew up in a household of journalists in South Florida. Her father, the late Robes Patton, was a sports writer for the Sun-Sentinel who covered the Miami Heat, and is for whom the press lounge in the American Airlines Arena is named.

Broadband Data

New Broadband Mapping Fabric Will Help Unify Geocoding Across the Broadband Industry, Experts Say

Tim White

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on

Photo of Lynn Follansbee from October 2019 by Drew Clark

The Open Technology Institute of New America on Wednesday released a blog post focusing on Ammon, Idaho, and highlighted how the open access broadband networks there better meets customers’ needs and expectations that most vertically-integrated broadband networks.

In comparing broadband prices globally, a 2014 study by OTI on the cost of connectivity report found that U.S. residents paid more for broadband internet service than their counterparts in Asia or Europe.

The study stated “most U.S. cities lag behind European and Asian cities in our sample in terms of what consumers pay for 25 Mbps of service, and what consumers can get for $50.”

OTI, a tech “do tank” in the midst of the New America think tank, highlighted the Ammon experience in lights of its cost of connectivity report from six years ago.

Collaborating on a local level with government and stakeholders, Ammon leaders found “a local solution to a local problem,” wrote Becky Chao and Lukas Pietrzak in the blog post.

A rural, southeastern city in Idaho, Ammon is a costly investment for private internet providers. However, “[Ammon] created its own fiber optic network, which now serves the government, businesses, and residents, transforming Ammon into one of the most affordable broadband markets in the country.”

Their design eliminated infrastructure deployment costs for service providers, making their city a market-friendly broadband hotspot. Additionally, Ammon’s network saves the city $70,000 yearly, and is estimated to save $43.6 million in 25 years.

Now Ammon residents can choose from 18 different broadband providers and a range of affordable prices, some of which include CenturyLink, DirectCom, FyberCom, or SpeedConnect.

Ammon has a web portal that easily helps customers navigate through internet provider subscriptions.

Continue Reading

Broadband Data

GOP Grills FCC on Improving Broadband Mapping Now, as Agency Spells Out New Rules

Tim White

Published

on

Photo of former FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaking at the March 2019 launch of US Telecom’s mapping initiative by Drew Clark

The Open Technology Institute of New America on Wednesday released a blog post focusing on Ammon, Idaho, and highlighted how the open access broadband networks there better meets customers’ needs and expectations that most vertically-integrated broadband networks.

In comparing broadband prices globally, a 2014 study by OTI on the cost of connectivity report found that U.S. residents paid more for broadband internet service than their counterparts in Asia or Europe.

The study stated “most U.S. cities lag behind European and Asian cities in our sample in terms of what consumers pay for 25 Mbps of service, and what consumers can get for $50.”

OTI, a tech “do tank” in the midst of the New America think tank, highlighted the Ammon experience in lights of its cost of connectivity report from six years ago.

Collaborating on a local level with government and stakeholders, Ammon leaders found “a local solution to a local problem,” wrote Becky Chao and Lukas Pietrzak in the blog post.

A rural, southeastern city in Idaho, Ammon is a costly investment for private internet providers. However, “[Ammon] created its own fiber optic network, which now serves the government, businesses, and residents, transforming Ammon into one of the most affordable broadband markets in the country.”

Their design eliminated infrastructure deployment costs for service providers, making their city a market-friendly broadband hotspot. Additionally, Ammon’s network saves the city $70,000 yearly, and is estimated to save $43.6 million in 25 years.

Now Ammon residents can choose from 18 different broadband providers and a range of affordable prices, some of which include CenturyLink, DirectCom, FyberCom, or SpeedConnect.

Ammon has a web portal that easily helps customers navigate through internet provider subscriptions.

Continue Reading

Broadband Data

Broadband Breakfast Interview with BroadbandNow about Gigabit Coverage and Unreliable FCC Data

Broadband Breakfast Sponsor

Published

on

The Open Technology Institute of New America on Wednesday released a blog post focusing on Ammon, Idaho, and highlighted how the open access broadband networks there better meets customers’ needs and expectations that most vertically-integrated broadband networks.

In comparing broadband prices globally, a 2014 study by OTI on the cost of connectivity report found that U.S. residents paid more for broadband internet service than their counterparts in Asia or Europe.

The study stated “most U.S. cities lag behind European and Asian cities in our sample in terms of what consumers pay for 25 Mbps of service, and what consumers can get for $50.”

OTI, a tech “do tank” in the midst of the New America think tank, highlighted the Ammon experience in lights of its cost of connectivity report from six years ago.

Collaborating on a local level with government and stakeholders, Ammon leaders found “a local solution to a local problem,” wrote Becky Chao and Lukas Pietrzak in the blog post.

A rural, southeastern city in Idaho, Ammon is a costly investment for private internet providers. However, “[Ammon] created its own fiber optic network, which now serves the government, businesses, and residents, transforming Ammon into one of the most affordable broadband markets in the country.”

Their design eliminated infrastructure deployment costs for service providers, making their city a market-friendly broadband hotspot. Additionally, Ammon’s network saves the city $70,000 yearly, and is estimated to save $43.6 million in 25 years.

Now Ammon residents can choose from 18 different broadband providers and a range of affordable prices, some of which include CenturyLink, DirectCom, FyberCom, or SpeedConnect.

Ammon has a web portal that easily helps customers navigate through internet provider subscriptions.

Continue Reading

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