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Broadband's Impact

Passive Optical Networks Need to Transform As More Americans Rely on Fiber at Home

Elijah Labby

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Photo from PxHere used with permission

May 7, 2020 – Current passive optical network technology will have to transform if it wants to survive, said Adtran product line manager Javier Lopez in a Thursday webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has created a traffic surge that gives a glimpse into the future of passive optical networks, Lopez said. The fiber optic companies that enable them should continue to improve them so that new technologies will be available when increased usage surpasses the current technology’s ability to accommodate it.

Americans are using these networks to work from home as well as to stream movies and TV shows, play video games and monitor their properties constantly with smart homes and security cameras.

 

The top-tier broadband companies are reporting an average increase of more than 100 percent, Lopez said. 

At this rate, he added, broadband companies will see five times more network usage in the next five years — a number that is not sustainable with current gigabit passive optical network infrastructure.

 

A worst-case scenario shows the current technology unable to provide high-speed internet for Americans as early as 2026. 

The next evolution in the so-called “GPON” technology will be the transition to 10 Gigabit networks, even for residential purposes, Lopez said.

These transitions could come as early as 2021, he said, and would bring a higher return on investment.

Elijah Labby was a Reporter with Broadband Breakfast. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and now resides in Orlando, Florida. He studies political science at Seminole State College, and enjoys reading and writing fiction (but not for Broadband Breakfast).

Education

FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel Unveils Proposed Rules for Emergency Connectivity Fund

Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel on Friday released rules for the Emergency Connectivity Fund, answering many questions about the program.

Benjamin Kahn

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Photo of Jessica Rosenworcel from the FCC

May 7, 2020 – Current passive optical network technology will have to transform if it wants to survive, said Adtran product line manager Javier Lopez in a Thursday webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has created a traffic surge that gives a glimpse into the future of passive optical networks, Lopez said. The fiber optic companies that enable them should continue to improve them so that new technologies will be available when increased usage surpasses the current technology’s ability to accommodate it.

Americans are using these networks to work from home as well as to stream movies and TV shows, play video games and monitor their properties constantly with smart homes and security cameras.

 

The top-tier broadband companies are reporting an average increase of more than 100 percent, Lopez said. 

At this rate, he added, broadband companies will see five times more network usage in the next five years — a number that is not sustainable with current gigabit passive optical network infrastructure.

 

A worst-case scenario shows the current technology unable to provide high-speed internet for Americans as early as 2026. 

The next evolution in the so-called “GPON” technology will be the transition to 10 Gigabit networks, even for residential purposes, Lopez said.

These transitions could come as early as 2021, he said, and would bring a higher return on investment.

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Broadband's Impact

FCC Fines Company $4.1 Million for Slamming and Cramming Consumer Phone Lines

The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday fined Tele Circuit Network Corporation for switching consumers’ service providers.

Benjamin Kahn

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on

Photo of Geoffrey Starks by Amelia Holowaty Krales of the Verge

May 7, 2020 – Current passive optical network technology will have to transform if it wants to survive, said Adtran product line manager Javier Lopez in a Thursday webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has created a traffic surge that gives a glimpse into the future of passive optical networks, Lopez said. The fiber optic companies that enable them should continue to improve them so that new technologies will be available when increased usage surpasses the current technology’s ability to accommodate it.

Americans are using these networks to work from home as well as to stream movies and TV shows, play video games and monitor their properties constantly with smart homes and security cameras.

 

The top-tier broadband companies are reporting an average increase of more than 100 percent, Lopez said. 

At this rate, he added, broadband companies will see five times more network usage in the next five years — a number that is not sustainable with current gigabit passive optical network infrastructure.

 

A worst-case scenario shows the current technology unable to provide high-speed internet for Americans as early as 2026. 

The next evolution in the so-called “GPON” technology will be the transition to 10 Gigabit networks, even for residential purposes, Lopez said.

These transitions could come as early as 2021, he said, and would bring a higher return on investment.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Popularity Of Telework And Telehealth Presents Unique Opportunities For A Post-Pandemic World

A survey released earlier this month illustrates opportunities for remote work and care.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Screenshot of Hernan Galperin via YouTube

May 7, 2020 – Current passive optical network technology will have to transform if it wants to survive, said Adtran product line manager Javier Lopez in a Thursday webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has created a traffic surge that gives a glimpse into the future of passive optical networks, Lopez said. The fiber optic companies that enable them should continue to improve them so that new technologies will be available when increased usage surpasses the current technology’s ability to accommodate it.

Americans are using these networks to work from home as well as to stream movies and TV shows, play video games and monitor their properties constantly with smart homes and security cameras.

 

The top-tier broadband companies are reporting an average increase of more than 100 percent, Lopez said. 

At this rate, he added, broadband companies will see five times more network usage in the next five years — a number that is not sustainable with current gigabit passive optical network infrastructure.

 

A worst-case scenario shows the current technology unable to provide high-speed internet for Americans as early as 2026. 

The next evolution in the so-called “GPON” technology will be the transition to 10 Gigabit networks, even for residential purposes, Lopez said.

These transitions could come as early as 2021, he said, and would bring a higher return on investment.

Continue Reading

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