Connect with us

Fiber

Bandwidth Demands Project 10 Gigabit Network Capabilities Required Next Decade

Published

on

Photo of fiber optic cable installation by Tony Harp used with permission

June 11, 2020 — “Many gigabit passive optical networks will exhaust in the 2020s, as bandwidth demands have been accelerated by COVID-19,” said Ed Harstead, lead technologist at Nokia, at a webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association on Thursday.

Panelists predicted that gigabit networks offering both upload and download speeds of 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps) will be the go-to technology of the next decade. Fiber networks, both passive optical networks and active ethernet networks, are the infrastructure that bring optical fiber cabling and signals to end users.

Fueled by increased telework, Internet of Things and cloud computing, bandwidth demands are projected to continue to increase in the coming years. These technologies demand low latency, hyper responsive networks.

As the United States prepares to deploy more fiber networks, it is crucial to attempt to limit architecture change, said Teresa McGaughey, senior director of solutions marketing at Calix. McGaughey recommended that service providers attempt to build future-proof networks.

McGaughey argued that 10 Gbps services are important in all locations, but noted that key clients driving the demand for deployment of 10 Gbps passive optic networks are businesses and multi-tenant housing units.

South Korea is already leading the way in regard to upgrading its networks to next-generation fiber-optic technology. The country aims to offer 10 Gbps speeds to approximately 50 percent of subscribers by the end of 2022.

Chinese vendors are already pushing forward to develop 50 Gbps optic networks, while other vendors are considering a 25 Gbps optic network upgrade path.

Currently, demand for 10 Gbps optical networks appears limited; it is rare for American consumers to require speeds faster than 1 Gbps upload/download.

Nevertheless, panelists said, the demand may be closer than expected.

Assistant Editor Jericho Casper graduated from the University of Virginia studying media policy. She grew up in Newport News in an area heavily impacted by the digital divide. She has a passion for universal access and a vendetta against anyone who stands in the way of her getting better broadband.

Open Access

Open Access Networks Key To Affordability Question, House Committee Hears

The House Energy and Commerce committee heard arguments that open access to networks is crucial for competition and affordability.

Published

on

Screenshot of Francella Ochillo from House hearing

June 11, 2020 — “Many gigabit passive optical networks will exhaust in the 2020s, as bandwidth demands have been accelerated by COVID-19,” said Ed Harstead, lead technologist at Nokia, at a webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association on Thursday.

Panelists predicted that gigabit networks offering both upload and download speeds of 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps) will be the go-to technology of the next decade. Fiber networks, both passive optical networks and active ethernet networks, are the infrastructure that bring optical fiber cabling and signals to end users.

Fueled by increased telework, Internet of Things and cloud computing, bandwidth demands are projected to continue to increase in the coming years. These technologies demand low latency, hyper responsive networks.

As the United States prepares to deploy more fiber networks, it is crucial to attempt to limit architecture change, said Teresa McGaughey, senior director of solutions marketing at Calix. McGaughey recommended that service providers attempt to build future-proof networks.

McGaughey argued that 10 Gbps services are important in all locations, but noted that key clients driving the demand for deployment of 10 Gbps passive optic networks are businesses and multi-tenant housing units.

South Korea is already leading the way in regard to upgrading its networks to next-generation fiber-optic technology. The country aims to offer 10 Gbps speeds to approximately 50 percent of subscribers by the end of 2022.

Chinese vendors are already pushing forward to develop 50 Gbps optic networks, while other vendors are considering a 25 Gbps optic network upgrade path.

Currently, demand for 10 Gbps optical networks appears limited; it is rare for American consumers to require speeds faster than 1 Gbps upload/download.

Nevertheless, panelists said, the demand may be closer than expected.

Continue Reading

Fiber

Partnerships And Trust Go Long Way To Securing Financing For Broadband Projects, Panelists Say

Broadband Breakfast panelists wrestle with the challenge of financing broadband infrastructure projects.

Published

on

Screenshot taken from Broadband Live Online event

June 11, 2020 — “Many gigabit passive optical networks will exhaust in the 2020s, as bandwidth demands have been accelerated by COVID-19,” said Ed Harstead, lead technologist at Nokia, at a webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association on Thursday.

Panelists predicted that gigabit networks offering both upload and download speeds of 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps) will be the go-to technology of the next decade. Fiber networks, both passive optical networks and active ethernet networks, are the infrastructure that bring optical fiber cabling and signals to end users.

Fueled by increased telework, Internet of Things and cloud computing, bandwidth demands are projected to continue to increase in the coming years. These technologies demand low latency, hyper responsive networks.

As the United States prepares to deploy more fiber networks, it is crucial to attempt to limit architecture change, said Teresa McGaughey, senior director of solutions marketing at Calix. McGaughey recommended that service providers attempt to build future-proof networks.

McGaughey argued that 10 Gbps services are important in all locations, but noted that key clients driving the demand for deployment of 10 Gbps passive optic networks are businesses and multi-tenant housing units.

South Korea is already leading the way in regard to upgrading its networks to next-generation fiber-optic technology. The country aims to offer 10 Gbps speeds to approximately 50 percent of subscribers by the end of 2022.

Chinese vendors are already pushing forward to develop 50 Gbps optic networks, while other vendors are considering a 25 Gbps optic network upgrade path.

Currently, demand for 10 Gbps optical networks appears limited; it is rare for American consumers to require speeds faster than 1 Gbps upload/download.

Nevertheless, panelists said, the demand may be closer than expected.

Continue Reading

Europe

Openreach Partners With STL For Fiber Build

Openreach aims to get 20 million fiber-to-the-premise connections by later this decade.

Published

on

Screenshot of STL's Ankit Agarwal via YouTube

June 11, 2020 — “Many gigabit passive optical networks will exhaust in the 2020s, as bandwidth demands have been accelerated by COVID-19,” said Ed Harstead, lead technologist at Nokia, at a webinar hosted by the Fiber Broadband Association on Thursday.

Panelists predicted that gigabit networks offering both upload and download speeds of 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps) will be the go-to technology of the next decade. Fiber networks, both passive optical networks and active ethernet networks, are the infrastructure that bring optical fiber cabling and signals to end users.

Fueled by increased telework, Internet of Things and cloud computing, bandwidth demands are projected to continue to increase in the coming years. These technologies demand low latency, hyper responsive networks.

As the United States prepares to deploy more fiber networks, it is crucial to attempt to limit architecture change, said Teresa McGaughey, senior director of solutions marketing at Calix. McGaughey recommended that service providers attempt to build future-proof networks.

McGaughey argued that 10 Gbps services are important in all locations, but noted that key clients driving the demand for deployment of 10 Gbps passive optic networks are businesses and multi-tenant housing units.

South Korea is already leading the way in regard to upgrading its networks to next-generation fiber-optic technology. The country aims to offer 10 Gbps speeds to approximately 50 percent of subscribers by the end of 2022.

Chinese vendors are already pushing forward to develop 50 Gbps optic networks, while other vendors are considering a 25 Gbps optic network upgrade path.

Currently, demand for 10 Gbps optical networks appears limited; it is rare for American consumers to require speeds faster than 1 Gbps upload/download.

Nevertheless, panelists said, the demand may be closer than expected.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending