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C-Band Auction Crucial for the Development of 5G Technology, says American Enterprise Institute Fellow

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Photo of Shane Tews, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, by State of the Net used with permission

June 18, 2020 — The Federal Communications Commission’s October C-Band auction will be a crucial step toward developing America’s 5G capabilities, said Shane Tews, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Speaking at Wednesday event on “The Urgency of Spectrum in Reopening America” hosted by the American Consumer Institute, Tews said the technology has incredible upsides and will greatly improve the speed and efficiency of communications, but there are barriers to its rollout.

“5G has the ability to have much faster, lower latency equipment,” she explained, “but that means you actually have to put physical equipment in place.”

Tews noted that the C-Band, which sits between 3.7 GigaHertz (GHz) and 4.2 GHz, is precious territory of radio-frequency spectrum. Because of this, she said, it can be difficult to get government agencies to open up the space to private industry.

“Part of the challenge is getting these government entities to be persuaded to move up or down in that space,” she said.

She also said that in the same way the government is reluctant to loosen their hold on the band, they are also hesitant to describe their activity in it.

“We’re not completely clear on what the government’s doing because they don’t have to tell us,” she said.

“I call it the black box problem, where you go in and talk to the Department of Defense… and you say, ‘You’ve had the capability to use it for 20 years…We could get you guys to be a collaborative effort.’ And they just say, ‘No, it’s top-secret stuff — can’t tell you.’”

Tews claimed that the agencies have a vested interest in holding onto their spots in the band, which has led to friction, as in the case of the Ligado debacle and the DoD’s subsequent public anger.

“It has the ability to bring in probably a very large number for the government because it’s the sweet spot for what we need for next-generation networks,” she said.

Despite this, Tews predicted that the auction would be a great opportunity for private industry to develop technologies that will help to close the digital divide.

 

Elijah Labby was a Reporter with Broadband Breakfast. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and now resides in Orlando, Florida. He studies political science at Seminole State College, and enjoys reading and writing fiction (but not for Broadband Breakfast).

5G

Broadband Breakfast Interview About the Future of 5G with John Godfrey of Samsung

Greater availability of mid-band spectrum has kick-started 5G through better signal propagation, penetration and carrying capacity.

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June 18, 2020 — The Federal Communications Commission’s October C-Band auction will be a crucial step toward developing America’s 5G capabilities, said Shane Tews, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Speaking at Wednesday event on “The Urgency of Spectrum in Reopening America” hosted by the American Consumer Institute, Tews said the technology has incredible upsides and will greatly improve the speed and efficiency of communications, but there are barriers to its rollout.

“5G has the ability to have much faster, lower latency equipment,” she explained, “but that means you actually have to put physical equipment in place.”

Tews noted that the C-Band, which sits between 3.7 GigaHertz (GHz) and 4.2 GHz, is precious territory of radio-frequency spectrum. Because of this, she said, it can be difficult to get government agencies to open up the space to private industry.

“Part of the challenge is getting these government entities to be persuaded to move up or down in that space,” she said.

She also said that in the same way the government is reluctant to loosen their hold on the band, they are also hesitant to describe their activity in it.

“We’re not completely clear on what the government’s doing because they don’t have to tell us,” she said.

“I call it the black box problem, where you go in and talk to the Department of Defense… and you say, ‘You’ve had the capability to use it for 20 years…We could get you guys to be a collaborative effort.’ And they just say, ‘No, it’s top-secret stuff — can’t tell you.’”

Tews claimed that the agencies have a vested interest in holding onto their spots in the band, which has led to friction, as in the case of the Ligado debacle and the DoD’s subsequent public anger.

“It has the ability to bring in probably a very large number for the government because it’s the sweet spot for what we need for next-generation networks,” she said.

Despite this, Tews predicted that the auction would be a great opportunity for private industry to develop technologies that will help to close the digital divide.

 

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5G

Network Automation is Key to 5G’s Future, Experts Say

Artificial intelligence can help manage an increasingly growing network with the advent of new devices on 5G networks.

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Screenshot of Amdoc's Ofer Farkash at the 5G symposium in early June

June 18, 2020 — The Federal Communications Commission’s October C-Band auction will be a crucial step toward developing America’s 5G capabilities, said Shane Tews, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Speaking at Wednesday event on “The Urgency of Spectrum in Reopening America” hosted by the American Consumer Institute, Tews said the technology has incredible upsides and will greatly improve the speed and efficiency of communications, but there are barriers to its rollout.

“5G has the ability to have much faster, lower latency equipment,” she explained, “but that means you actually have to put physical equipment in place.”

Tews noted that the C-Band, which sits between 3.7 GigaHertz (GHz) and 4.2 GHz, is precious territory of radio-frequency spectrum. Because of this, she said, it can be difficult to get government agencies to open up the space to private industry.

“Part of the challenge is getting these government entities to be persuaded to move up or down in that space,” she said.

She also said that in the same way the government is reluctant to loosen their hold on the band, they are also hesitant to describe their activity in it.

“We’re not completely clear on what the government’s doing because they don’t have to tell us,” she said.

“I call it the black box problem, where you go in and talk to the Department of Defense… and you say, ‘You’ve had the capability to use it for 20 years…We could get you guys to be a collaborative effort.’ And they just say, ‘No, it’s top-secret stuff — can’t tell you.’”

Tews claimed that the agencies have a vested interest in holding onto their spots in the band, which has led to friction, as in the case of the Ligado debacle and the DoD’s subsequent public anger.

“It has the ability to bring in probably a very large number for the government because it’s the sweet spot for what we need for next-generation networks,” she said.

Despite this, Tews predicted that the auction would be a great opportunity for private industry to develop technologies that will help to close the digital divide.

 

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5G

Robert Kubik, John Godfrey and Derek Johnston: After a Decade of Progress, What’s Next for 5G?

A decade after the advent of LTE, the next-generation 5G will be, and already is, a critical resource for Americans.

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The authors of this Expert Opinion are Samsung Electronics America officials Robert Kubik, John Godfrey and Derek Johnston

June 18, 2020 — The Federal Communications Commission’s October C-Band auction will be a crucial step toward developing America’s 5G capabilities, said Shane Tews, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Speaking at Wednesday event on “The Urgency of Spectrum in Reopening America” hosted by the American Consumer Institute, Tews said the technology has incredible upsides and will greatly improve the speed and efficiency of communications, but there are barriers to its rollout.

“5G has the ability to have much faster, lower latency equipment,” she explained, “but that means you actually have to put physical equipment in place.”

Tews noted that the C-Band, which sits between 3.7 GigaHertz (GHz) and 4.2 GHz, is precious territory of radio-frequency spectrum. Because of this, she said, it can be difficult to get government agencies to open up the space to private industry.

“Part of the challenge is getting these government entities to be persuaded to move up or down in that space,” she said.

She also said that in the same way the government is reluctant to loosen their hold on the band, they are also hesitant to describe their activity in it.

“We’re not completely clear on what the government’s doing because they don’t have to tell us,” she said.

“I call it the black box problem, where you go in and talk to the Department of Defense… and you say, ‘You’ve had the capability to use it for 20 years…We could get you guys to be a collaborative effort.’ And they just say, ‘No, it’s top-secret stuff — can’t tell you.’”

Tews claimed that the agencies have a vested interest in holding onto their spots in the band, which has led to friction, as in the case of the Ligado debacle and the DoD’s subsequent public anger.

“It has the ability to bring in probably a very large number for the government because it’s the sweet spot for what we need for next-generation networks,” she said.

Despite this, Tews predicted that the auction would be a great opportunity for private industry to develop technologies that will help to close the digital divide.

 

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