Connect with us

Antitrust

Antitrust and Data Protection Emerge as Top FTC Priorities During Senate Hearing

Published

on

Screenshot of Sen. Richard Blumenthal from the webcast

August 5, 2020 — The five leaders of the Federal Trade Commission testified together before a Senate panel for the first time in nearly two years on Wednesday.

The FTC is charged with maintaining a competitive marketplace and protecting consumers’ personal information, and members of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation maintained that the agency has a significant role to play in the enforcement of antitrust and data privacy legislation.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., reminded the FTC commissioners that tech conglomerates Facebook and Amazon are within their purview, arguing that last Wednesday’s historic House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee hearing brought about a greater sense of urgency to act.

This led FTC Chairman Joseph Simons to reveal that litigation against Facebook is currently ongoing.

Referencing Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp, Simons reported that “breaking up Facebook is an option that is definitely on the table.”

When Blumenthal asked Simons when the American public can expect antitrust action against these companies, Simons replied that the agency has been giving out warning letters.

Blumenthal suggested that a better course of action for the commission would be to introduce legislation on the books, rather than continuously sending warning letters, “which is like starting over every time,” he said.

Simons revealed that no investigation into Amazon has been started as of yet, when Blumenthal questioned whether he believed it would be necessary to depose Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos.

The hearing was further aimed at ensuring Congress had done enough to empower the FTC to ensure the agency was able to act against big tech companies.

“We believe we need more authority,” Simons said.

Other FTC commissioners requested to be granted jurisdiction over common carriers and given the ability to impose civil penalties.

The commissioners urged members of the Senate to continue enacting data privacy and security legislation.

“The FTC stands ready to enforce a national data privacy law,” said FTC Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter.

Former Assistant Editor Jericho Casper graduated from the University of Virginia studying media policy. She grew up in Newport News in an area heavily impacted by the digital divide. She has a passion for universal access and a vendetta against anyone who stands in the way of her getting better broadband. She is now Associate Broadband Researcher at the Institute for Local Self Reliance's Community Broadband Network Initiative.

Antitrust

Explainer: Antitrust Heats Up as Biden Selects Tech Critic Jonathan Kanter for Top Enforcement Spot

In the fourth in a series of explainers, Broadband Breakfast examines the Biden administration’s intent to bash Big Tech.

Published

on

Photo of Jonathan Kanter at the Capitol Forum by New America used with permission

August 5, 2020 — The five leaders of the Federal Trade Commission testified together before a Senate panel for the first time in nearly two years on Wednesday.

The FTC is charged with maintaining a competitive marketplace and protecting consumers’ personal information, and members of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation maintained that the agency has a significant role to play in the enforcement of antitrust and data privacy legislation.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., reminded the FTC commissioners that tech conglomerates Facebook and Amazon are within their purview, arguing that last Wednesday’s historic House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee hearing brought about a greater sense of urgency to act.

This led FTC Chairman Joseph Simons to reveal that litigation against Facebook is currently ongoing.

Referencing Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp, Simons reported that “breaking up Facebook is an option that is definitely on the table.”

When Blumenthal asked Simons when the American public can expect antitrust action against these companies, Simons replied that the agency has been giving out warning letters.

Blumenthal suggested that a better course of action for the commission would be to introduce legislation on the books, rather than continuously sending warning letters, “which is like starting over every time,” he said.

Simons revealed that no investigation into Amazon has been started as of yet, when Blumenthal questioned whether he believed it would be necessary to depose Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos.

The hearing was further aimed at ensuring Congress had done enough to empower the FTC to ensure the agency was able to act against big tech companies.

“We believe we need more authority,” Simons said.

Other FTC commissioners requested to be granted jurisdiction over common carriers and given the ability to impose civil penalties.

The commissioners urged members of the Senate to continue enacting data privacy and security legislation.

“The FTC stands ready to enforce a national data privacy law,” said FTC Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter.

Continue Reading

Antitrust

Federal Trade Commission Expands Antitrust Enforcement By Rescinding Obama-Era Policy

In a party-line vote, the agency rescinded a 2015 statement that limited the scope of antitrust enforcement.

Published

on

Photo of FTC Chairwoman Lina Khan.

August 5, 2020 — The five leaders of the Federal Trade Commission testified together before a Senate panel for the first time in nearly two years on Wednesday.

The FTC is charged with maintaining a competitive marketplace and protecting consumers’ personal information, and members of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation maintained that the agency has a significant role to play in the enforcement of antitrust and data privacy legislation.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., reminded the FTC commissioners that tech conglomerates Facebook and Amazon are within their purview, arguing that last Wednesday’s historic House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee hearing brought about a greater sense of urgency to act.

This led FTC Chairman Joseph Simons to reveal that litigation against Facebook is currently ongoing.

Referencing Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp, Simons reported that “breaking up Facebook is an option that is definitely on the table.”

When Blumenthal asked Simons when the American public can expect antitrust action against these companies, Simons replied that the agency has been giving out warning letters.

Blumenthal suggested that a better course of action for the commission would be to introduce legislation on the books, rather than continuously sending warning letters, “which is like starting over every time,” he said.

Simons revealed that no investigation into Amazon has been started as of yet, when Blumenthal questioned whether he believed it would be necessary to depose Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos.

The hearing was further aimed at ensuring Congress had done enough to empower the FTC to ensure the agency was able to act against big tech companies.

“We believe we need more authority,” Simons said.

Other FTC commissioners requested to be granted jurisdiction over common carriers and given the ability to impose civil penalties.

The commissioners urged members of the Senate to continue enacting data privacy and security legislation.

“The FTC stands ready to enforce a national data privacy law,” said FTC Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter.

Continue Reading

Antitrust

Experts Disagree Over Need, Feasibility of Global Standards for Antitrust Rules

Legal experts and economists disagreed over the feasibility and necessity of a global standard for antitrust enforcement.

Published

on

Aurelien Portuese of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

August 5, 2020 — The five leaders of the Federal Trade Commission testified together before a Senate panel for the first time in nearly two years on Wednesday.

The FTC is charged with maintaining a competitive marketplace and protecting consumers’ personal information, and members of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation maintained that the agency has a significant role to play in the enforcement of antitrust and data privacy legislation.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., reminded the FTC commissioners that tech conglomerates Facebook and Amazon are within their purview, arguing that last Wednesday’s historic House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee hearing brought about a greater sense of urgency to act.

This led FTC Chairman Joseph Simons to reveal that litigation against Facebook is currently ongoing.

Referencing Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp, Simons reported that “breaking up Facebook is an option that is definitely on the table.”

When Blumenthal asked Simons when the American public can expect antitrust action against these companies, Simons replied that the agency has been giving out warning letters.

Blumenthal suggested that a better course of action for the commission would be to introduce legislation on the books, rather than continuously sending warning letters, “which is like starting over every time,” he said.

Simons revealed that no investigation into Amazon has been started as of yet, when Blumenthal questioned whether he believed it would be necessary to depose Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos.

The hearing was further aimed at ensuring Congress had done enough to empower the FTC to ensure the agency was able to act against big tech companies.

“We believe we need more authority,” Simons said.

Other FTC commissioners requested to be granted jurisdiction over common carriers and given the ability to impose civil penalties.

The commissioners urged members of the Senate to continue enacting data privacy and security legislation.

“The FTC stands ready to enforce a national data privacy law,” said FTC Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

 

Trending