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Telecom National Security Processes Streamlined, Ready.net’s Growth Platform, Illinois Computer Equity

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Photo of Illinois Gov. J. B. Pritzker from the Chicago Tribune

Changes to the Federal Communications Commission’s review process for certain applications involving foreign ownership go into effect Monday. These new rules are designed to streamline and improve transparency of what had been an unpredictable process, according to The CommLaw Group.

Previously, in a process that could take several months, the executive branch agencies informally referred to as “Team Telecom” would draft rounds of questions for applicants, following FCC referral.  To improve timeliness and transparency in the process, the new rules establish a time frame for review processes.

The rules further require the International Bureau to issue a standard set of national security and law enforcement questions, which are expected to encapsulate what used to be a standard part of initial triage questions, to be included in certain applications.

The new rules expand the FCC’s discretion in making referrals. With more information provided by applicants at the outset, the FCC might not refer the same types of applications as it commonly did in the past.

The Order clarifies that the FCC will not routinely refer international 214 and 310(b) applications to executive branch agencies, as it had in the past. The FCC further retains discretion to refer any other types of applications if it finds that executive branch participation is necessary for the FCC’s public interest determination.

San Francisco-based startup Ready.net provides a growth platform for local ISPs

According to the founders of startup Ready.net, Jase Wilson and Mike Faloon, it will take more than philanthropy to overcome America’s digital divide, it will take entrepreneurship.

The San Francisco-based company recently raised venture capital funding from Thiel Capital, Arbor Ventures, and notable angels such as Ralph Gootee, Calvin French-Owen and others, in order to launch their platform, branded as the all-in-one platform for growing local ISPs, reported Forbes.

Ready.net attempts to bring together everything local ISPs, municipal broadband networks and REC operators need to acquire, protect, and earn more from their subscribers.

Ready.net “lets local ISPs, the backbone of America’s rural internet, focus on delivering high-quality access through incumbent-grade subscriber experience software,” says Gootee, a cofounder of PlanGrid and angel investor in Ready.net.

Wilson and Faloon, both hailing from small, rural towns lacking high-speed broadband, were inspired by local ISPs to embark on the startup. The two entrepreneurs see a middle America which has the talent but lacks the capital and the software to build better broadband for themselves. The pair started Ready.net to support the smaller ISPs currently working to meet rural America’s digital needs.

Wilson and Faloon believe telecom giants ignore the over 160 million Americans without fixed broadband access. CEO Wilson says, “We were tired of folks like our friends and family not getting high-quality internet access and falling behind. And the local ISPs getting squished by the copper cartel using public money to stifle competition.”

“Our customers are the local ISPs. Our goal is to help them focus on what they can control. We thought we could help them solve their two biggest rate limiters – access to capital and modern software that works for them,” said Wilson.

Illinois launches statewide computer equity network

Governor J.B. Pritzker and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle recently announced a first of its kind statewide initiative to expand digital access for low-income households in Illinois. Through a unique partnership with PCs for People and other community partners, the Connect Illinois Computer Equity Network is working to help put refurbished computer equipment and low-cost internet service into the hands of Illinois households in need.

To be eligible, residents’ income must be below 200 percent of the poverty level or they must be enrolled in an income-based government assistance program, such as free and reduced lunch, Medicaid, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

While initial investments by the state and its corporate partners are paving the way to collect, refurbish, and deploy 20,000 devices, much need still remains – with an estimated 1.1 million households in Illinois lacking a computer at home.

“Everyone is invited to donate their outdated computers,” Pritzker said, adding that PCs for People will provide secure data wiping of all donated items.

Pritzker is calling on Illinois’s public, private, and philanthropic partners to make their devices available for donation. Colleges and other institutions of higher education that are upgrading equipment can donate their older computers. Counties, cities, or even small towns are also encouraged to partner with local businesses to recycle equipment.

“Long before we had ever heard of COVID-19, I set the ambitious goal of bringing broadband and digital infrastructure to every corner of Illinois by 2024 through a program called Connect Illinois,” Pritzker said. While the state is well on its way to making broadband accessible to every Illinoisan, “the ability to plug into broadband means nothing when you don’t have a device to start with.”

Broadband Roundup

FCC Says 4M on Emergency Broadband Benefit, Ritter Puts $12M in Arkansas, New STL Cabling Product

$3.2-billion program has 4 million households, Ritter to connect 100% in river valley, STL efficient cables.

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Ritter Communications CEO Alan Morse, left.

Changes to the Federal Communications Commission’s review process for certain applications involving foreign ownership go into effect Monday. These new rules are designed to streamline and improve transparency of what had been an unpredictable process, according to The CommLaw Group.

Previously, in a process that could take several months, the executive branch agencies informally referred to as “Team Telecom” would draft rounds of questions for applicants, following FCC referral.  To improve timeliness and transparency in the process, the new rules establish a time frame for review processes.

The rules further require the International Bureau to issue a standard set of national security and law enforcement questions, which are expected to encapsulate what used to be a standard part of initial triage questions, to be included in certain applications.

The new rules expand the FCC’s discretion in making referrals. With more information provided by applicants at the outset, the FCC might not refer the same types of applications as it commonly did in the past.

The Order clarifies that the FCC will not routinely refer international 214 and 310(b) applications to executive branch agencies, as it had in the past. The FCC further retains discretion to refer any other types of applications if it finds that executive branch participation is necessary for the FCC’s public interest determination.

San Francisco-based startup Ready.net provides a growth platform for local ISPs

According to the founders of startup Ready.net, Jase Wilson and Mike Faloon, it will take more than philanthropy to overcome America’s digital divide, it will take entrepreneurship.

The San Francisco-based company recently raised venture capital funding from Thiel Capital, Arbor Ventures, and notable angels such as Ralph Gootee, Calvin French-Owen and others, in order to launch their platform, branded as the all-in-one platform for growing local ISPs, reported Forbes.

Ready.net attempts to bring together everything local ISPs, municipal broadband networks and REC operators need to acquire, protect, and earn more from their subscribers.

Ready.net “lets local ISPs, the backbone of America’s rural internet, focus on delivering high-quality access through incumbent-grade subscriber experience software,” says Gootee, a cofounder of PlanGrid and angel investor in Ready.net.

Wilson and Faloon, both hailing from small, rural towns lacking high-speed broadband, were inspired by local ISPs to embark on the startup. The two entrepreneurs see a middle America which has the talent but lacks the capital and the software to build better broadband for themselves. The pair started Ready.net to support the smaller ISPs currently working to meet rural America’s digital needs.

Wilson and Faloon believe telecom giants ignore the over 160 million Americans without fixed broadband access. CEO Wilson says, “We were tired of folks like our friends and family not getting high-quality internet access and falling behind. And the local ISPs getting squished by the copper cartel using public money to stifle competition.”

“Our customers are the local ISPs. Our goal is to help them focus on what they can control. We thought we could help them solve their two biggest rate limiters – access to capital and modern software that works for them,” said Wilson.

Illinois launches statewide computer equity network

Governor J.B. Pritzker and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle recently announced a first of its kind statewide initiative to expand digital access for low-income households in Illinois. Through a unique partnership with PCs for People and other community partners, the Connect Illinois Computer Equity Network is working to help put refurbished computer equipment and low-cost internet service into the hands of Illinois households in need.

To be eligible, residents’ income must be below 200 percent of the poverty level or they must be enrolled in an income-based government assistance program, such as free and reduced lunch, Medicaid, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

While initial investments by the state and its corporate partners are paving the way to collect, refurbish, and deploy 20,000 devices, much need still remains – with an estimated 1.1 million households in Illinois lacking a computer at home.

“Everyone is invited to donate their outdated computers,” Pritzker said, adding that PCs for People will provide secure data wiping of all donated items.

Pritzker is calling on Illinois’s public, private, and philanthropic partners to make their devices available for donation. Colleges and other institutions of higher education that are upgrading equipment can donate their older computers. Counties, cities, or even small towns are also encouraged to partner with local businesses to recycle equipment.

“Long before we had ever heard of COVID-19, I set the ambitious goal of bringing broadband and digital infrastructure to every corner of Illinois by 2024 through a program called Connect Illinois,” Pritzker said. While the state is well on its way to making broadband accessible to every Illinoisan, “the ability to plug into broadband means nothing when you don’t have a device to start with.”

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Broadband Roundup

New York Drops $15 Internet, Lumen Gets Army Contract, Illinois Signs Telehealth Bill

New York drops $15 internet after interim court decision, Lumen gets army contract for broadband, Illinois allows telehealth for all.

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Changes to the Federal Communications Commission’s review process for certain applications involving foreign ownership go into effect Monday. These new rules are designed to streamline and improve transparency of what had been an unpredictable process, according to The CommLaw Group.

Previously, in a process that could take several months, the executive branch agencies informally referred to as “Team Telecom” would draft rounds of questions for applicants, following FCC referral.  To improve timeliness and transparency in the process, the new rules establish a time frame for review processes.

The rules further require the International Bureau to issue a standard set of national security and law enforcement questions, which are expected to encapsulate what used to be a standard part of initial triage questions, to be included in certain applications.

The new rules expand the FCC’s discretion in making referrals. With more information provided by applicants at the outset, the FCC might not refer the same types of applications as it commonly did in the past.

The Order clarifies that the FCC will not routinely refer international 214 and 310(b) applications to executive branch agencies, as it had in the past. The FCC further retains discretion to refer any other types of applications if it finds that executive branch participation is necessary for the FCC’s public interest determination.

San Francisco-based startup Ready.net provides a growth platform for local ISPs

According to the founders of startup Ready.net, Jase Wilson and Mike Faloon, it will take more than philanthropy to overcome America’s digital divide, it will take entrepreneurship.

The San Francisco-based company recently raised venture capital funding from Thiel Capital, Arbor Ventures, and notable angels such as Ralph Gootee, Calvin French-Owen and others, in order to launch their platform, branded as the all-in-one platform for growing local ISPs, reported Forbes.

Ready.net attempts to bring together everything local ISPs, municipal broadband networks and REC operators need to acquire, protect, and earn more from their subscribers.

Ready.net “lets local ISPs, the backbone of America’s rural internet, focus on delivering high-quality access through incumbent-grade subscriber experience software,” says Gootee, a cofounder of PlanGrid and angel investor in Ready.net.

Wilson and Faloon, both hailing from small, rural towns lacking high-speed broadband, were inspired by local ISPs to embark on the startup. The two entrepreneurs see a middle America which has the talent but lacks the capital and the software to build better broadband for themselves. The pair started Ready.net to support the smaller ISPs currently working to meet rural America’s digital needs.

Wilson and Faloon believe telecom giants ignore the over 160 million Americans without fixed broadband access. CEO Wilson says, “We were tired of folks like our friends and family not getting high-quality internet access and falling behind. And the local ISPs getting squished by the copper cartel using public money to stifle competition.”

“Our customers are the local ISPs. Our goal is to help them focus on what they can control. We thought we could help them solve their two biggest rate limiters – access to capital and modern software that works for them,” said Wilson.

Illinois launches statewide computer equity network

Governor J.B. Pritzker and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle recently announced a first of its kind statewide initiative to expand digital access for low-income households in Illinois. Through a unique partnership with PCs for People and other community partners, the Connect Illinois Computer Equity Network is working to help put refurbished computer equipment and low-cost internet service into the hands of Illinois households in need.

To be eligible, residents’ income must be below 200 percent of the poverty level or they must be enrolled in an income-based government assistance program, such as free and reduced lunch, Medicaid, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

While initial investments by the state and its corporate partners are paving the way to collect, refurbish, and deploy 20,000 devices, much need still remains – with an estimated 1.1 million households in Illinois lacking a computer at home.

“Everyone is invited to donate their outdated computers,” Pritzker said, adding that PCs for People will provide secure data wiping of all donated items.

Pritzker is calling on Illinois’s public, private, and philanthropic partners to make their devices available for donation. Colleges and other institutions of higher education that are upgrading equipment can donate their older computers. Counties, cities, or even small towns are also encouraged to partner with local businesses to recycle equipment.

“Long before we had ever heard of COVID-19, I set the ambitious goal of bringing broadband and digital infrastructure to every corner of Illinois by 2024 through a program called Connect Illinois,” Pritzker said. While the state is well on its way to making broadband accessible to every Illinoisan, “the ability to plug into broadband means nothing when you don’t have a device to start with.”

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Broadband Roundup

FCC C-Band 5G Licenses, Proposed Antitrust Bill Harms Startups, Klobuchar Bill Takes Heat

FCC prioritizes mid-band spectrum, proposed antitrust bill will damage startups, Amy Klobuchar’s proposed Section 230 reform takes on heat.

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota

Changes to the Federal Communications Commission’s review process for certain applications involving foreign ownership go into effect Monday. These new rules are designed to streamline and improve transparency of what had been an unpredictable process, according to The CommLaw Group.

Previously, in a process that could take several months, the executive branch agencies informally referred to as “Team Telecom” would draft rounds of questions for applicants, following FCC referral.  To improve timeliness and transparency in the process, the new rules establish a time frame for review processes.

The rules further require the International Bureau to issue a standard set of national security and law enforcement questions, which are expected to encapsulate what used to be a standard part of initial triage questions, to be included in certain applications.

The new rules expand the FCC’s discretion in making referrals. With more information provided by applicants at the outset, the FCC might not refer the same types of applications as it commonly did in the past.

The Order clarifies that the FCC will not routinely refer international 214 and 310(b) applications to executive branch agencies, as it had in the past. The FCC further retains discretion to refer any other types of applications if it finds that executive branch participation is necessary for the FCC’s public interest determination.

San Francisco-based startup Ready.net provides a growth platform for local ISPs

According to the founders of startup Ready.net, Jase Wilson and Mike Faloon, it will take more than philanthropy to overcome America’s digital divide, it will take entrepreneurship.

The San Francisco-based company recently raised venture capital funding from Thiel Capital, Arbor Ventures, and notable angels such as Ralph Gootee, Calvin French-Owen and others, in order to launch their platform, branded as the all-in-one platform for growing local ISPs, reported Forbes.

Ready.net attempts to bring together everything local ISPs, municipal broadband networks and REC operators need to acquire, protect, and earn more from their subscribers.

Ready.net “lets local ISPs, the backbone of America’s rural internet, focus on delivering high-quality access through incumbent-grade subscriber experience software,” says Gootee, a cofounder of PlanGrid and angel investor in Ready.net.

Wilson and Faloon, both hailing from small, rural towns lacking high-speed broadband, were inspired by local ISPs to embark on the startup. The two entrepreneurs see a middle America which has the talent but lacks the capital and the software to build better broadband for themselves. The pair started Ready.net to support the smaller ISPs currently working to meet rural America’s digital needs.

Wilson and Faloon believe telecom giants ignore the over 160 million Americans without fixed broadband access. CEO Wilson says, “We were tired of folks like our friends and family not getting high-quality internet access and falling behind. And the local ISPs getting squished by the copper cartel using public money to stifle competition.”

“Our customers are the local ISPs. Our goal is to help them focus on what they can control. We thought we could help them solve their two biggest rate limiters – access to capital and modern software that works for them,” said Wilson.

Illinois launches statewide computer equity network

Governor J.B. Pritzker and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle recently announced a first of its kind statewide initiative to expand digital access for low-income households in Illinois. Through a unique partnership with PCs for People and other community partners, the Connect Illinois Computer Equity Network is working to help put refurbished computer equipment and low-cost internet service into the hands of Illinois households in need.

To be eligible, residents’ income must be below 200 percent of the poverty level or they must be enrolled in an income-based government assistance program, such as free and reduced lunch, Medicaid, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

While initial investments by the state and its corporate partners are paving the way to collect, refurbish, and deploy 20,000 devices, much need still remains – with an estimated 1.1 million households in Illinois lacking a computer at home.

“Everyone is invited to donate their outdated computers,” Pritzker said, adding that PCs for People will provide secure data wiping of all donated items.

Pritzker is calling on Illinois’s public, private, and philanthropic partners to make their devices available for donation. Colleges and other institutions of higher education that are upgrading equipment can donate their older computers. Counties, cities, or even small towns are also encouraged to partner with local businesses to recycle equipment.

“Long before we had ever heard of COVID-19, I set the ambitious goal of bringing broadband and digital infrastructure to every corner of Illinois by 2024 through a program called Connect Illinois,” Pritzker said. While the state is well on its way to making broadband accessible to every Illinoisan, “the ability to plug into broadband means nothing when you don’t have a device to start with.”

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