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Digital Museums and Smart Cities: Verizon CEO Explores 5G Potential Beyond Just a Better Smartphone

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Photo of Hans Vestberg at the 2021 Consumer Electronics Show

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

Reporter Tim White studied communication and political science at the University of Utah, and previously worked on Capitol Hill for a member of Congress. A native of Salt Lake City, he escapes to the Pacific Northwest as often as he can. He is passionate about politics, Star Wars, and breakfast cereal.

5G

Broadband Breakfast Interview About the Future of 5G with John Godfrey of Samsung

Greater availability of mid-band spectrum has kick-started 5G through better signal propagation, penetration and carrying capacity.

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January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

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5G

Network Automation is Key to 5G’s Future, Experts Say

Artificial intelligence can help manage an increasingly growing network with the advent of new devices on 5G networks.

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Screenshot of Amdoc's Ofer Farkash at the 5G symposium in early June

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

Continue Reading

5G

Robert Kubik, John Godfrey and Derek Johnston: After a Decade of Progress, What’s Next for 5G?

A decade after the advent of LTE, the next-generation 5G will be, and already is, a critical resource for Americans.

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The authors of this Expert Opinion are Samsung Electronics America officials Robert Kubik, John Godfrey and Derek Johnston

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

Continue Reading

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