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Artificial Intelligence

Connectivity Will Need To Keep Up With The Advent Of New Tech, Says Expert

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Screenshot from the webinar

February 24, 2021 – It used to be that technology had to keep up with the deployment of the growing ubiquity of broadband innovations. But the pace of technological advancements in the home is starting a conversation about whether connectivity can keep up.

That’s according to Shawn DuBravac, an accountant and author of a book about how big data will transform our everyday lives, who argues that the pandemic has illustrated the need for broader connections in the home to meet the need of future technologies. He was speaking on Tuesday at the conference of NTCA – The Rural Broadband Association.

Emerging consumer technologies, such as Samsung’s robots, which will perform tasks including loading a dishwasher, serving wine, and setting a dinner table, are redefining the conversation about how connectivity at home will manage them, DuBravac argues.

Health companies are also introducing “companion robots” focused on interacting with seniors. With its artificial intelligence and sensors, these robots develop a personality to adapt to the needs of consumers so social distancing does not become a disadvantage for care.

As such, the pandemic has grown the telehealth industry. With more people avoiding going to hospitals, the creation of watches, belts, scales that are connected to share information with medical professionals is further requiring better broadband connectivity to keep up.

But it’s not like the industry isn’t paying attention. Mesh network technologies, which utilize multiple router-like devices to enhance coverage inside the home, have started to emerge just as smart-home technologies illustrated the need for broader connectivity that better enhanced coverage as Wi-Fi signals experienced degradation through walls.

Reporter Samuel Triginelli was born in Brazil and grew up speaking Portuguese and English, and later learned French and Spanish. He studied communications at Brigham Young University, where he also worked as a product administrator and UX/UI designer. He wants a world with better internet access for all.

Artificial Intelligence

Staying Ahead On Artificial Intelligence Requires International Cooperation

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on

Screenshot from the webinar

February 24, 2021 – It used to be that technology had to keep up with the deployment of the growing ubiquity of broadband innovations. But the pace of technological advancements in the home is starting a conversation about whether connectivity can keep up.

That’s according to Shawn DuBravac, an accountant and author of a book about how big data will transform our everyday lives, who argues that the pandemic has illustrated the need for broader connections in the home to meet the need of future technologies. He was speaking on Tuesday at the conference of NTCA – The Rural Broadband Association.

Emerging consumer technologies, such as Samsung’s robots, which will perform tasks including loading a dishwasher, serving wine, and setting a dinner table, are redefining the conversation about how connectivity at home will manage them, DuBravac argues.

Health companies are also introducing “companion robots” focused on interacting with seniors. With its artificial intelligence and sensors, these robots develop a personality to adapt to the needs of consumers so social distancing does not become a disadvantage for care.

As such, the pandemic has grown the telehealth industry. With more people avoiding going to hospitals, the creation of watches, belts, scales that are connected to share information with medical professionals is further requiring better broadband connectivity to keep up.

But it’s not like the industry isn’t paying attention. Mesh network technologies, which utilize multiple router-like devices to enhance coverage inside the home, have started to emerge just as smart-home technologies illustrated the need for broader connectivity that better enhanced coverage as Wi-Fi signals experienced degradation through walls.

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Artificial Intelligence

AI the Most Important Change in Health Care Since Introduction of the MRI, Say Experts

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on

Screenshot from the webinar

February 24, 2021 – It used to be that technology had to keep up with the deployment of the growing ubiquity of broadband innovations. But the pace of technological advancements in the home is starting a conversation about whether connectivity can keep up.

That’s according to Shawn DuBravac, an accountant and author of a book about how big data will transform our everyday lives, who argues that the pandemic has illustrated the need for broader connections in the home to meet the need of future technologies. He was speaking on Tuesday at the conference of NTCA – The Rural Broadband Association.

Emerging consumer technologies, such as Samsung’s robots, which will perform tasks including loading a dishwasher, serving wine, and setting a dinner table, are redefining the conversation about how connectivity at home will manage them, DuBravac argues.

Health companies are also introducing “companion robots” focused on interacting with seniors. With its artificial intelligence and sensors, these robots develop a personality to adapt to the needs of consumers so social distancing does not become a disadvantage for care.

As such, the pandemic has grown the telehealth industry. With more people avoiding going to hospitals, the creation of watches, belts, scales that are connected to share information with medical professionals is further requiring better broadband connectivity to keep up.

But it’s not like the industry isn’t paying attention. Mesh network technologies, which utilize multiple router-like devices to enhance coverage inside the home, have started to emerge just as smart-home technologies illustrated the need for broader connectivity that better enhanced coverage as Wi-Fi signals experienced degradation through walls.

Continue Reading

Artificial Intelligence

Many Questions Remain Unanswered About Big Tech, Defense Use of AI

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Photo of Alka Patel, Head of AI Ethics Policy at the Department of Defense’s JAIC, by CMU

February 24, 2021 – It used to be that technology had to keep up with the deployment of the growing ubiquity of broadband innovations. But the pace of technological advancements in the home is starting a conversation about whether connectivity can keep up.

That’s according to Shawn DuBravac, an accountant and author of a book about how big data will transform our everyday lives, who argues that the pandemic has illustrated the need for broader connections in the home to meet the need of future technologies. He was speaking on Tuesday at the conference of NTCA – The Rural Broadband Association.

Emerging consumer technologies, such as Samsung’s robots, which will perform tasks including loading a dishwasher, serving wine, and setting a dinner table, are redefining the conversation about how connectivity at home will manage them, DuBravac argues.

Health companies are also introducing “companion robots” focused on interacting with seniors. With its artificial intelligence and sensors, these robots develop a personality to adapt to the needs of consumers so social distancing does not become a disadvantage for care.

As such, the pandemic has grown the telehealth industry. With more people avoiding going to hospitals, the creation of watches, belts, scales that are connected to share information with medical professionals is further requiring better broadband connectivity to keep up.

But it’s not like the industry isn’t paying attention. Mesh network technologies, which utilize multiple router-like devices to enhance coverage inside the home, have started to emerge just as smart-home technologies illustrated the need for broader connectivity that better enhanced coverage as Wi-Fi signals experienced degradation through walls.

Continue Reading

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