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Digital Inclusion

Federal Communications Commission Releases Proposed Rules Regarding Emergency Broadband Benefit

Derek Shumway

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on

Photo from FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel's office

February 22, 2021 – Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday released proposed rules governing the implementation of the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program.

If adopted by the agency, the program would unleash $3.2 billion of federal initiative for qualifying households to receive discounts on their internet service and provide an opportunity to receive a computer or tablet at a discounted price.

The proposed rules include opening the emergency benefit program to all types of broadband providers, requiring them to provide broadband service to eligible households receiving reimbursements for service and devices. Households are also encouraged to “affirmatively indicate their interest in the program.”

To be eligible for the program, a member of the household can qualify through a variety of ways.  One way is to also qualify for the FCC’s Lifeline program, an older program that helped make communication services like telephone and broadband more affordable.

Household members that have received a federal Pell grant or receive benefits under the free and reduced-price school lunch or breakfast program also may qualify. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, members who have experienced a substantial loss of income or meet eligibility criteria for a participating providers’ existing low-income or COVID-19 program can also qualify.

“As we work our way through a pandemic that has upended so much in our day-to-day life, we have been asked to migrate so many of the things we do online,” said Rosenworcel. “From work to healthcare to education, this crisis has made it clear that without an internet connection too many households are locked out of modern life. It’s more apparent than ever that broadband is no longer nice-to-have. It’s need-to-have.”

“No one should have to choose between paying their internet bill or paying to put food on the table,” she added.

Born in China and adopted to American Fork, Utah, Reporter Derek Shumway graduated from Brigham Young University with a bachelor's degree in political science and a minor in international strategy and diplomacy. At college, he started an LED lightbulb company.

Digital Inclusion

Popularity Of Telework And Telehealth Presents Unique Opportunities For A Post-Pandemic World

A survey released earlier this month illustrates opportunities for remote work and care.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Screenshot of Hernan Galperin via YouTube

February 22, 2021 – Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday released proposed rules governing the implementation of the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program.

If adopted by the agency, the program would unleash $3.2 billion of federal initiative for qualifying households to receive discounts on their internet service and provide an opportunity to receive a computer or tablet at a discounted price.

The proposed rules include opening the emergency benefit program to all types of broadband providers, requiring them to provide broadband service to eligible households receiving reimbursements for service and devices. Households are also encouraged to “affirmatively indicate their interest in the program.”

To be eligible for the program, a member of the household can qualify through a variety of ways.  One way is to also qualify for the FCC’s Lifeline program, an older program that helped make communication services like telephone and broadband more affordable.

Household members that have received a federal Pell grant or receive benefits under the free and reduced-price school lunch or breakfast program also may qualify. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, members who have experienced a substantial loss of income or meet eligibility criteria for a participating providers’ existing low-income or COVID-19 program can also qualify.

“As we work our way through a pandemic that has upended so much in our day-to-day life, we have been asked to migrate so many of the things we do online,” said Rosenworcel. “From work to healthcare to education, this crisis has made it clear that without an internet connection too many households are locked out of modern life. It’s more apparent than ever that broadband is no longer nice-to-have. It’s need-to-have.”

“No one should have to choose between paying their internet bill or paying to put food on the table,” she added.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Virt Seeks To Serve As The Hub To Find And Join Virtual Events

Launched last week, virt.com hopes to take advantage of the rise in virtual events by crowdsourcing them in one place.

Tim White

Published

on

Photo of GHS co-founder Victor Zonana, left, from Global Health New Zealand

February 22, 2021 – Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday released proposed rules governing the implementation of the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program.

If adopted by the agency, the program would unleash $3.2 billion of federal initiative for qualifying households to receive discounts on their internet service and provide an opportunity to receive a computer or tablet at a discounted price.

The proposed rules include opening the emergency benefit program to all types of broadband providers, requiring them to provide broadband service to eligible households receiving reimbursements for service and devices. Households are also encouraged to “affirmatively indicate their interest in the program.”

To be eligible for the program, a member of the household can qualify through a variety of ways.  One way is to also qualify for the FCC’s Lifeline program, an older program that helped make communication services like telephone and broadband more affordable.

Household members that have received a federal Pell grant or receive benefits under the free and reduced-price school lunch or breakfast program also may qualify. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, members who have experienced a substantial loss of income or meet eligibility criteria for a participating providers’ existing low-income or COVID-19 program can also qualify.

“As we work our way through a pandemic that has upended so much in our day-to-day life, we have been asked to migrate so many of the things we do online,” said Rosenworcel. “From work to healthcare to education, this crisis has made it clear that without an internet connection too many households are locked out of modern life. It’s more apparent than ever that broadband is no longer nice-to-have. It’s need-to-have.”

“No one should have to choose between paying their internet bill or paying to put food on the table,” she added.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Starry and Non-Profit PCs for People Seek Affordable Connectivity, Affordable Devices and Digital Literacy

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Photo of Starry Senior Vice President Virginia Adams from Public Knowledge

February 22, 2021 – Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday released proposed rules governing the implementation of the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program.

If adopted by the agency, the program would unleash $3.2 billion of federal initiative for qualifying households to receive discounts on their internet service and provide an opportunity to receive a computer or tablet at a discounted price.

The proposed rules include opening the emergency benefit program to all types of broadband providers, requiring them to provide broadband service to eligible households receiving reimbursements for service and devices. Households are also encouraged to “affirmatively indicate their interest in the program.”

To be eligible for the program, a member of the household can qualify through a variety of ways.  One way is to also qualify for the FCC’s Lifeline program, an older program that helped make communication services like telephone and broadband more affordable.

Household members that have received a federal Pell grant or receive benefits under the free and reduced-price school lunch or breakfast program also may qualify. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, members who have experienced a substantial loss of income or meet eligibility criteria for a participating providers’ existing low-income or COVID-19 program can also qualify.

“As we work our way through a pandemic that has upended so much in our day-to-day life, we have been asked to migrate so many of the things we do online,” said Rosenworcel. “From work to healthcare to education, this crisis has made it clear that without an internet connection too many households are locked out of modern life. It’s more apparent than ever that broadband is no longer nice-to-have. It’s need-to-have.”

“No one should have to choose between paying their internet bill or paying to put food on the table,” she added.

Continue Reading

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