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Big Tech

Big Tech Not Anticompetitive, But May Require Careful Regulation

Samuel Triginelli

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Screenshot from the webinar

March 8, 2021 – Lawmakers should not rush to paint big technology companies as monopolists and should carefully analyze what is worth regulating, according to commentators speaking at a Thursday Law and Economics Center webinar.

The fallacious notion that big tech companies don’t have much competition stems from the perception about how society interacts online, and which may by dictated by a small number of these corporations.

But Adam White, executive director at the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, said different tech companies are focusing on completely different parts of the human and social experience, thus making it harder to categorize these companies as anticompetitive monopolists.

The debate comes as lawmakers propose reforms to the Section 230 internet liability provision, which currently insulates social media platforms from lawsuits stemming from what their users post.

Genevieve Lakier, assistant professor of law at the University of Chicago Law School, said big tech shouldn’t have to raise competition alarms to be regulated.

Rather, lawmakers should look to how these companies influence behavior, with targeted ads and the push to show people what the technology companies think people would like.

Social Media

Josh Hawley Wants To Break Up Big Tech And Revisit How Antitrust Matters Are Considered

Senator Josh Hawley talks Section 230, antitrust reform, and the Capitol riots.

Benjamin Kahn

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Josh Hawley, right, via Flickr

March 8, 2021 – Lawmakers should not rush to paint big technology companies as monopolists and should carefully analyze what is worth regulating, according to commentators speaking at a Thursday Law and Economics Center webinar.

The fallacious notion that big tech companies don’t have much competition stems from the perception about how society interacts online, and which may by dictated by a small number of these corporations.

But Adam White, executive director at the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, said different tech companies are focusing on completely different parts of the human and social experience, thus making it harder to categorize these companies as anticompetitive monopolists.

The debate comes as lawmakers propose reforms to the Section 230 internet liability provision, which currently insulates social media platforms from lawsuits stemming from what their users post.

Genevieve Lakier, assistant professor of law at the University of Chicago Law School, said big tech shouldn’t have to raise competition alarms to be regulated.

Rather, lawmakers should look to how these companies influence behavior, with targeted ads and the push to show people what the technology companies think people would like.

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Social Media

Oversight Board Upholds Trump’s Ban From Facebook

The Oversight Board has sent the decision back to Facebook management, criticizing it for setting a “standardless” penalty.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

March 8, 2021 – Lawmakers should not rush to paint big technology companies as monopolists and should carefully analyze what is worth regulating, according to commentators speaking at a Thursday Law and Economics Center webinar.

The fallacious notion that big tech companies don’t have much competition stems from the perception about how society interacts online, and which may by dictated by a small number of these corporations.

But Adam White, executive director at the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, said different tech companies are focusing on completely different parts of the human and social experience, thus making it harder to categorize these companies as anticompetitive monopolists.

The debate comes as lawmakers propose reforms to the Section 230 internet liability provision, which currently insulates social media platforms from lawsuits stemming from what their users post.

Genevieve Lakier, assistant professor of law at the University of Chicago Law School, said big tech shouldn’t have to raise competition alarms to be regulated.

Rather, lawmakers should look to how these companies influence behavior, with targeted ads and the push to show people what the technology companies think people would like.

Continue Reading

Big Tech

Lina Khan Pitches Ideas For Regulating Big Tech In Nomination Hearing

Senate Commerce Committee considers nominations for Lina Khan, Bill Nelson and Leslie Kiernan.

Tim White

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on

Screenshot of Lina Khan at Senate hearing

March 8, 2021 – Lawmakers should not rush to paint big technology companies as monopolists and should carefully analyze what is worth regulating, according to commentators speaking at a Thursday Law and Economics Center webinar.

The fallacious notion that big tech companies don’t have much competition stems from the perception about how society interacts online, and which may by dictated by a small number of these corporations.

But Adam White, executive director at the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, said different tech companies are focusing on completely different parts of the human and social experience, thus making it harder to categorize these companies as anticompetitive monopolists.

The debate comes as lawmakers propose reforms to the Section 230 internet liability provision, which currently insulates social media platforms from lawsuits stemming from what their users post.

Genevieve Lakier, assistant professor of law at the University of Chicago Law School, said big tech shouldn’t have to raise competition alarms to be regulated.

Rather, lawmakers should look to how these companies influence behavior, with targeted ads and the push to show people what the technology companies think people would like.

Continue Reading

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