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Facebook’s Oversight Board Defends Against Critics Who Call It a Shield For Company

Samuel Triginelli

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on

Screenshot taken from South By Southwest event 

March 16, 2021 – A member of Facebook’s Oversight Board, which was created to provide content moderation decisions for the social media giant, defended itself Tuesday against critics who say it was created as a sort-of regulatory shield for the company.

The board’s head of communications, Dax Hunter-Torricke, said at the South by Southwest conference Tuesday that “the board was not created to be reputational or a regulation shield for Facebook. Board members are a team of experts in politics, journalism, law, and several other areas that are very independent and don’t have their careers tied to Facebook. They feel no problem speaking against it.”

The conference, which began Tuesday, has so-far heard about social media’s influence on American life, including how it helped drum up the January 6 Capitol riots.

The panel heard stories of incitement of hatred, the presence of genocide, and contribution to election manipulation that have made a separate content moderation institution a necessity to combat the issues plaguing the platform. The company regularly purges its platform of fringe entities.

The board said it has been tasked with showing how it came to content moderation decisions. It used that as an example of how it is ensuring its decisions are not impacted by the public or the company.

Hunter-Torricke added that the status quo on content moderation is broken and that the Oversight Board is here to make things better through transparency of decision-making, which is historically different than what Facebook has been doing.

The board has already been called upon to decide cases of content moderation, and in 80% of these cases, the board has overturned the Facebook content moderation decision.

Reporter Samuel Triginelli was born in Brazil and grew up speaking Portuguese and English, and later learned French and Spanish. He studied communications at Brigham Young University, where he also worked as a product administrator and UX/UI designer. He wants a world with better internet access for all.

Antitrust

Section 230 Has Coddled Big Tech For Too Long, Says Co-Author of Book on Amazon

Co-author of “The Amazon Jungle” says Section 230 has allowed Big Tech to get away with far too much.

Derek Shumway

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on

"The Amazon Jungle" co-author Jason Boyce

March 16, 2021 – A member of Facebook’s Oversight Board, which was created to provide content moderation decisions for the social media giant, defended itself Tuesday against critics who say it was created as a sort-of regulatory shield for the company.

The board’s head of communications, Dax Hunter-Torricke, said at the South by Southwest conference Tuesday that “the board was not created to be reputational or a regulation shield for Facebook. Board members are a team of experts in politics, journalism, law, and several other areas that are very independent and don’t have their careers tied to Facebook. They feel no problem speaking against it.”

The conference, which began Tuesday, has so-far heard about social media’s influence on American life, including how it helped drum up the January 6 Capitol riots.

The panel heard stories of incitement of hatred, the presence of genocide, and contribution to election manipulation that have made a separate content moderation institution a necessity to combat the issues plaguing the platform. The company regularly purges its platform of fringe entities.

The board said it has been tasked with showing how it came to content moderation decisions. It used that as an example of how it is ensuring its decisions are not impacted by the public or the company.

Hunter-Torricke added that the status quo on content moderation is broken and that the Oversight Board is here to make things better through transparency of decision-making, which is historically different than what Facebook has been doing.

The board has already been called upon to decide cases of content moderation, and in 80% of these cases, the board has overturned the Facebook content moderation decision.

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Social Media

Josh Hawley Wants To Break Up Big Tech And Revisit How Antitrust Matters Are Considered

Senator Josh Hawley talks Section 230, antitrust reform, and the Capitol riots.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Josh Hawley, right, via Flickr

March 16, 2021 – A member of Facebook’s Oversight Board, which was created to provide content moderation decisions for the social media giant, defended itself Tuesday against critics who say it was created as a sort-of regulatory shield for the company.

The board’s head of communications, Dax Hunter-Torricke, said at the South by Southwest conference Tuesday that “the board was not created to be reputational or a regulation shield for Facebook. Board members are a team of experts in politics, journalism, law, and several other areas that are very independent and don’t have their careers tied to Facebook. They feel no problem speaking against it.”

The conference, which began Tuesday, has so-far heard about social media’s influence on American life, including how it helped drum up the January 6 Capitol riots.

The panel heard stories of incitement of hatred, the presence of genocide, and contribution to election manipulation that have made a separate content moderation institution a necessity to combat the issues plaguing the platform. The company regularly purges its platform of fringe entities.

The board said it has been tasked with showing how it came to content moderation decisions. It used that as an example of how it is ensuring its decisions are not impacted by the public or the company.

Hunter-Torricke added that the status quo on content moderation is broken and that the Oversight Board is here to make things better through transparency of decision-making, which is historically different than what Facebook has been doing.

The board has already been called upon to decide cases of content moderation, and in 80% of these cases, the board has overturned the Facebook content moderation decision.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Oversight Board Upholds Trump’s Ban From Facebook

The Oversight Board has sent the decision back to Facebook management, criticizing it for setting a “standardless” penalty.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

March 16, 2021 – A member of Facebook’s Oversight Board, which was created to provide content moderation decisions for the social media giant, defended itself Tuesday against critics who say it was created as a sort-of regulatory shield for the company.

The board’s head of communications, Dax Hunter-Torricke, said at the South by Southwest conference Tuesday that “the board was not created to be reputational or a regulation shield for Facebook. Board members are a team of experts in politics, journalism, law, and several other areas that are very independent and don’t have their careers tied to Facebook. They feel no problem speaking against it.”

The conference, which began Tuesday, has so-far heard about social media’s influence on American life, including how it helped drum up the January 6 Capitol riots.

The panel heard stories of incitement of hatred, the presence of genocide, and contribution to election manipulation that have made a separate content moderation institution a necessity to combat the issues plaguing the platform. The company regularly purges its platform of fringe entities.

The board said it has been tasked with showing how it came to content moderation decisions. It used that as an example of how it is ensuring its decisions are not impacted by the public or the company.

Hunter-Torricke added that the status quo on content moderation is broken and that the Oversight Board is here to make things better through transparency of decision-making, which is historically different than what Facebook has been doing.

The board has already been called upon to decide cases of content moderation, and in 80% of these cases, the board has overturned the Facebook content moderation decision.

Continue Reading

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