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Spectrum

Federal Communications Commission Approves Auction Rules For 3.5 GigaHertz Band

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Screenshot from FCC monthly meeting

March 17, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission voted on a handful of items pertaining to the upcoming 3.45-3.55 GigaHertz (GHz) spectrum auction’s rules and bidding process.

Rules regarding the facilitation and operation of the 100 megahertz between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz were voted on Wednesday during the FCC’s monthly meeting.

Two of the aims of the order were to establish the band between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz for flexible-use for wireless and establish the bidding rules and technical service requirements for the upcoming auction of said band. The auction for this band would also be required to begin before January 1, 2022.

Commissioner Brendan Carr voiced his support for the order, stating that it would continue to secure the U.S.’s leadership role with the roll-out of 5G.

“This is by far the fastest effort ever to identify and auction federal spectrum for commercial use,” he said. “This will not only create efficiencies between operations in the two bands, [but] it will ensure robust 5G coverage, which is particularly helpful for accelerated builds in rural communities.”

Carr did voice concern that the FCC had imposed undue obstacles for would-be auction participants, and that the government seemed to be picking “winners and losers.”

He explained that he would have preferred fewer regulations, which he believed would have promoted greater competition.

Despite this concern, Carr ultimately joined with the rest of his fellow commissioners and Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel in voting to approve the order, while noting his reservations.

Rosenworcel said that to thrive in a post-pandemic world, 5G would need to be able to reach every American across the country, and that this order was a step toward that goal.

The commissioners and Rosenworcel also voted in favor of the public notice that would, among other things, propose bidding rounds, establish bidding credit caps for small businesses and rural service providers, and put forward minimum opening bid amounts for flexible-use licenses for the 3.45-3.55 GHz band.

As a child of American parents working abroad, Reporter Ben Kahn was raised as a third culture kid, growing up in five different countries, including the U.S.. He is a recent graduate of the University of Baltimore, where he majored in Policy, Politics, and International Affairs. He enjoys learning about foreign languages and cultures and can now speak poorly in more than one language.

Spectrum

Companies Clash Over Spectrum Sharing in 12 GHz Spectrum Band

Satellite service provider Dish, which is open to 12 GHz for mobile, recently signed a network sharing deal with AT&T.

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Screenshot from Broadband Breakfast Live Online episode on July 14.

March 17, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission voted on a handful of items pertaining to the upcoming 3.45-3.55 GigaHertz (GHz) spectrum auction’s rules and bidding process.

Rules regarding the facilitation and operation of the 100 megahertz between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz were voted on Wednesday during the FCC’s monthly meeting.

Two of the aims of the order were to establish the band between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz for flexible-use for wireless and establish the bidding rules and technical service requirements for the upcoming auction of said band. The auction for this band would also be required to begin before January 1, 2022.

Commissioner Brendan Carr voiced his support for the order, stating that it would continue to secure the U.S.’s leadership role with the roll-out of 5G.

“This is by far the fastest effort ever to identify and auction federal spectrum for commercial use,” he said. “This will not only create efficiencies between operations in the two bands, [but] it will ensure robust 5G coverage, which is particularly helpful for accelerated builds in rural communities.”

Carr did voice concern that the FCC had imposed undue obstacles for would-be auction participants, and that the government seemed to be picking “winners and losers.”

He explained that he would have preferred fewer regulations, which he believed would have promoted greater competition.

Despite this concern, Carr ultimately joined with the rest of his fellow commissioners and Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel in voting to approve the order, while noting his reservations.

Rosenworcel said that to thrive in a post-pandemic world, 5G would need to be able to reach every American across the country, and that this order was a step toward that goal.

The commissioners and Rosenworcel also voted in favor of the public notice that would, among other things, propose bidding rounds, establish bidding credit caps for small businesses and rural service providers, and put forward minimum opening bid amounts for flexible-use licenses for the 3.45-3.55 GHz band.

Continue Reading

Spectrum

Spectrum Decisions Becoming Increasingly Important for Future: FCC’s Simington

FCC Commissioner Nathan Simington said focus on spectrum decision will become increasingly important for digital success.

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FCC Commissioner Nathan Simington

March 17, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission voted on a handful of items pertaining to the upcoming 3.45-3.55 GigaHertz (GHz) spectrum auction’s rules and bidding process.

Rules regarding the facilitation and operation of the 100 megahertz between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz were voted on Wednesday during the FCC’s monthly meeting.

Two of the aims of the order were to establish the band between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz for flexible-use for wireless and establish the bidding rules and technical service requirements for the upcoming auction of said band. The auction for this band would also be required to begin before January 1, 2022.

Commissioner Brendan Carr voiced his support for the order, stating that it would continue to secure the U.S.’s leadership role with the roll-out of 5G.

“This is by far the fastest effort ever to identify and auction federal spectrum for commercial use,” he said. “This will not only create efficiencies between operations in the two bands, [but] it will ensure robust 5G coverage, which is particularly helpful for accelerated builds in rural communities.”

Carr did voice concern that the FCC had imposed undue obstacles for would-be auction participants, and that the government seemed to be picking “winners and losers.”

He explained that he would have preferred fewer regulations, which he believed would have promoted greater competition.

Despite this concern, Carr ultimately joined with the rest of his fellow commissioners and Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel in voting to approve the order, while noting his reservations.

Rosenworcel said that to thrive in a post-pandemic world, 5G would need to be able to reach every American across the country, and that this order was a step toward that goal.

The commissioners and Rosenworcel also voted in favor of the public notice that would, among other things, propose bidding rounds, establish bidding credit caps for small businesses and rural service providers, and put forward minimum opening bid amounts for flexible-use licenses for the 3.45-3.55 GHz band.

Continue Reading

Spectrum

Explainer: Is Spectrum Sharing a Key to Broader Connectivity Goals?

In the second in a series of explainers, Broadband Breakfast looks at the quickly emerging topic of spectrum sharing, as 5G ramps up against the finite resource.

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Image from Policy Impact Partners

March 17, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission voted on a handful of items pertaining to the upcoming 3.45-3.55 GigaHertz (GHz) spectrum auction’s rules and bidding process.

Rules regarding the facilitation and operation of the 100 megahertz between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz were voted on Wednesday during the FCC’s monthly meeting.

Two of the aims of the order were to establish the band between 3.45 GHz and 3.55 GHz for flexible-use for wireless and establish the bidding rules and technical service requirements for the upcoming auction of said band. The auction for this band would also be required to begin before January 1, 2022.

Commissioner Brendan Carr voiced his support for the order, stating that it would continue to secure the U.S.’s leadership role with the roll-out of 5G.

“This is by far the fastest effort ever to identify and auction federal spectrum for commercial use,” he said. “This will not only create efficiencies between operations in the two bands, [but] it will ensure robust 5G coverage, which is particularly helpful for accelerated builds in rural communities.”

Carr did voice concern that the FCC had imposed undue obstacles for would-be auction participants, and that the government seemed to be picking “winners and losers.”

He explained that he would have preferred fewer regulations, which he believed would have promoted greater competition.

Despite this concern, Carr ultimately joined with the rest of his fellow commissioners and Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel in voting to approve the order, while noting his reservations.

Rosenworcel said that to thrive in a post-pandemic world, 5G would need to be able to reach every American across the country, and that this order was a step toward that goal.

The commissioners and Rosenworcel also voted in favor of the public notice that would, among other things, propose bidding rounds, establish bidding credit caps for small businesses and rural service providers, and put forward minimum opening bid amounts for flexible-use licenses for the 3.45-3.55 GHz band.

Continue Reading

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