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Broadband Roundup

Investment for Lit Communities’ Fiber Networks, Clubhouse Hack, Senate Broadband Letter, WISPA

Samuel Triginelli

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Photo of CEO Brian Snider from Lit Communities

March 2, 2021 – Lit Communities on Monday announced the finalization of an investment with Stephens Capital Partners LLC and The Pritzker Organization that it said will help expand its fiber network across the country.

“We spent a long time trying to find investment partners who believe in what we were doing, trust our process, and see the future of how we could help bridge the digital divide that currently exists across America. We found those partners with Stephens and TPO,” Brian Snider, founder and CEO of Lit, said in a press release.

The project will leverage the company’s subsidiary Medina Fiber in Medina County, Ohio, giving municipalities the ability to implement next-generation connectivity for their residents, the company said.

With the new investments, “we will accelerate the rollout of Medina Fiber and look to future markets where our unique business model can thrive,” Lit Communities said in the release.

“Stephens and TPO have been true partners, and our teams have felt like a cohesive unit from the start. We look forward to working closely together to expand Lit connectivity nationwide.”

Clubhouse hack exposes inner risks with app

A security breach of the popular audio chat app Clubhouse is forcing the company to relook at who manages its traffic.

The app’s cybersecurity came into question last week after a hacker livestreamed several rooms, which are supposed to be private and between only those invited in the conversation. Following the breach, the app provided no update on how the hacker could gain access but promised better security.

Those security enhancements include adding cryptography and additional blocks to avoid having servers located in China, whose Agora Inc. manages the app’s data traffic and audio production and hiring a third-party security company to review the new app updates. Clubhouse officials said that the app only stores audio or users’ data when necessary for billing purposes and wire monitoring.

Clubhouse relies on the Shanghai-based startup to handle much of its back-end operations and infrastructure, according to Alex Stamos, director of the Stanford Internet Observatory and Facebook’s former security chief. Some are concerned that could lead to Chinese authorities cracking down on dissidents. The SIO has said that the Communist government could easily intercept this data.

That’s because Agora has the legal duty to help Chinese authorities to find the source of audios. Agora told Bloomberg News reporters Jamie Tarabay and Kartikay Mehrotra that it does not “store or share personally identifiable information” for any of its clients, of which Clubhouse is just one.

COVID-19 broadband programs to close digital divide

Sens. Angus King, Maggie Hassan and Mark Warner sent a letter on February 25 to the Federal Communications Commission with a view to guiding the process of administering the $3.2-billion Emergency Broadband Benefit Program and beyond.

The letter sets out a number of recommendations, including ensuring that the funding outlives the pandemic and informs future spending policy on bridging the digital divide; expanding the eligibility criteria for funding to ensure the broadest base gets support, include new providers and customers; ensuring that EBBP funding is accessible and streamlined while also including cost-sharing with local service providers; and collaborating with state and local and institutions for outreach and educational opportunities.

On February 22, Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel released proposed rules on how to administer the program, including opening up the benefit to multiple different broadband providers and using other subsidy benefits Americans received to determine who needs help the most.

New lobbyist at the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association

Former Senate legislative director Eric Slee was named the new director of government affairs for the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association on Monday.

With 15 years of experience in the public sector, building connections, and serving as a primary advisor to the Senator on policy matters, Slee will help manage WISPA’s growing state and local, grassroots, and WISPA political action committee portfolios.

“I have a keen understanding of the communications industry and know what it takes to communicate in clear, concise, and effective ways so that legislators know what a given issue fundamentally means to their constituents,” Slee said.  “WISPs offer the promise of prosperity to Americans – rural and urban – and I am truly excited to be part of the growing and vibrant team here at WISPA.”

Broadband Roundup

Vermont Looks To Expand Coverage, California Moves On Passive Infrastructure, AT&T Gets DoT Contract, Cisco Buys Sedona

Vermont looks to expand broadband, California looks at passive infrastructure, AT&T gets DoT contract, and Cisco to buy Sedona.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Vermont Governor Phil Scott

March 2, 2021 – Lit Communities on Monday announced the finalization of an investment with Stephens Capital Partners LLC and The Pritzker Organization that it said will help expand its fiber network across the country.

“We spent a long time trying to find investment partners who believe in what we were doing, trust our process, and see the future of how we could help bridge the digital divide that currently exists across America. We found those partners with Stephens and TPO,” Brian Snider, founder and CEO of Lit, said in a press release.

The project will leverage the company’s subsidiary Medina Fiber in Medina County, Ohio, giving municipalities the ability to implement next-generation connectivity for their residents, the company said.

With the new investments, “we will accelerate the rollout of Medina Fiber and look to future markets where our unique business model can thrive,” Lit Communities said in the release.

“Stephens and TPO have been true partners, and our teams have felt like a cohesive unit from the start. We look forward to working closely together to expand Lit connectivity nationwide.”

Clubhouse hack exposes inner risks with app

A security breach of the popular audio chat app Clubhouse is forcing the company to relook at who manages its traffic.

The app’s cybersecurity came into question last week after a hacker livestreamed several rooms, which are supposed to be private and between only those invited in the conversation. Following the breach, the app provided no update on how the hacker could gain access but promised better security.

Those security enhancements include adding cryptography and additional blocks to avoid having servers located in China, whose Agora Inc. manages the app’s data traffic and audio production and hiring a third-party security company to review the new app updates. Clubhouse officials said that the app only stores audio or users’ data when necessary for billing purposes and wire monitoring.

Clubhouse relies on the Shanghai-based startup to handle much of its back-end operations and infrastructure, according to Alex Stamos, director of the Stanford Internet Observatory and Facebook’s former security chief. Some are concerned that could lead to Chinese authorities cracking down on dissidents. The SIO has said that the Communist government could easily intercept this data.

That’s because Agora has the legal duty to help Chinese authorities to find the source of audios. Agora told Bloomberg News reporters Jamie Tarabay and Kartikay Mehrotra that it does not “store or share personally identifiable information” for any of its clients, of which Clubhouse is just one.

COVID-19 broadband programs to close digital divide

Sens. Angus King, Maggie Hassan and Mark Warner sent a letter on February 25 to the Federal Communications Commission with a view to guiding the process of administering the $3.2-billion Emergency Broadband Benefit Program and beyond.

The letter sets out a number of recommendations, including ensuring that the funding outlives the pandemic and informs future spending policy on bridging the digital divide; expanding the eligibility criteria for funding to ensure the broadest base gets support, include new providers and customers; ensuring that EBBP funding is accessible and streamlined while also including cost-sharing with local service providers; and collaborating with state and local and institutions for outreach and educational opportunities.

On February 22, Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel released proposed rules on how to administer the program, including opening up the benefit to multiple different broadband providers and using other subsidy benefits Americans received to determine who needs help the most.

New lobbyist at the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association

Former Senate legislative director Eric Slee was named the new director of government affairs for the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association on Monday.

With 15 years of experience in the public sector, building connections, and serving as a primary advisor to the Senator on policy matters, Slee will help manage WISPA’s growing state and local, grassroots, and WISPA political action committee portfolios.

“I have a keen understanding of the communications industry and know what it takes to communicate in clear, concise, and effective ways so that legislators know what a given issue fundamentally means to their constituents,” Slee said.  “WISPs offer the promise of prosperity to Americans – rural and urban – and I am truly excited to be part of the growing and vibrant team here at WISPA.”

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Broadband Roundup

Alabama Dispenses $17M In Broadband Funds, New Broadband Mapping Insight, Pipeline Attack

Ivey announces $17 million to deploy broadband, Microsoft data for broadband map, and “Robin Hood” group involved in pipeline attack.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Photo of Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey

March 2, 2021 – Lit Communities on Monday announced the finalization of an investment with Stephens Capital Partners LLC and The Pritzker Organization that it said will help expand its fiber network across the country.

“We spent a long time trying to find investment partners who believe in what we were doing, trust our process, and see the future of how we could help bridge the digital divide that currently exists across America. We found those partners with Stephens and TPO,” Brian Snider, founder and CEO of Lit, said in a press release.

The project will leverage the company’s subsidiary Medina Fiber in Medina County, Ohio, giving municipalities the ability to implement next-generation connectivity for their residents, the company said.

With the new investments, “we will accelerate the rollout of Medina Fiber and look to future markets where our unique business model can thrive,” Lit Communities said in the release.

“Stephens and TPO have been true partners, and our teams have felt like a cohesive unit from the start. We look forward to working closely together to expand Lit connectivity nationwide.”

Clubhouse hack exposes inner risks with app

A security breach of the popular audio chat app Clubhouse is forcing the company to relook at who manages its traffic.

The app’s cybersecurity came into question last week after a hacker livestreamed several rooms, which are supposed to be private and between only those invited in the conversation. Following the breach, the app provided no update on how the hacker could gain access but promised better security.

Those security enhancements include adding cryptography and additional blocks to avoid having servers located in China, whose Agora Inc. manages the app’s data traffic and audio production and hiring a third-party security company to review the new app updates. Clubhouse officials said that the app only stores audio or users’ data when necessary for billing purposes and wire monitoring.

Clubhouse relies on the Shanghai-based startup to handle much of its back-end operations and infrastructure, according to Alex Stamos, director of the Stanford Internet Observatory and Facebook’s former security chief. Some are concerned that could lead to Chinese authorities cracking down on dissidents. The SIO has said that the Communist government could easily intercept this data.

That’s because Agora has the legal duty to help Chinese authorities to find the source of audios. Agora told Bloomberg News reporters Jamie Tarabay and Kartikay Mehrotra that it does not “store or share personally identifiable information” for any of its clients, of which Clubhouse is just one.

COVID-19 broadband programs to close digital divide

Sens. Angus King, Maggie Hassan and Mark Warner sent a letter on February 25 to the Federal Communications Commission with a view to guiding the process of administering the $3.2-billion Emergency Broadband Benefit Program and beyond.

The letter sets out a number of recommendations, including ensuring that the funding outlives the pandemic and informs future spending policy on bridging the digital divide; expanding the eligibility criteria for funding to ensure the broadest base gets support, include new providers and customers; ensuring that EBBP funding is accessible and streamlined while also including cost-sharing with local service providers; and collaborating with state and local and institutions for outreach and educational opportunities.

On February 22, Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel released proposed rules on how to administer the program, including opening up the benefit to multiple different broadband providers and using other subsidy benefits Americans received to determine who needs help the most.

New lobbyist at the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association

Former Senate legislative director Eric Slee was named the new director of government affairs for the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association on Monday.

With 15 years of experience in the public sector, building connections, and serving as a primary advisor to the Senator on policy matters, Slee will help manage WISPA’s growing state and local, grassroots, and WISPA political action committee portfolios.

“I have a keen understanding of the communications industry and know what it takes to communicate in clear, concise, and effective ways so that legislators know what a given issue fundamentally means to their constituents,” Slee said.  “WISPs offer the promise of prosperity to Americans – rural and urban – and I am truly excited to be part of the growing and vibrant team here at WISPA.”

Continue Reading

Broadband Roundup

5G In 12 GHz Band, Vaccine Hotline, NAB On Fox Free Speech Case

Industry groups ask for 5G space on 12 GHz band, new hotline for vaccines, NAB on Fox free speech case.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Photo of Marilyn Mosby

March 2, 2021 – Lit Communities on Monday announced the finalization of an investment with Stephens Capital Partners LLC and The Pritzker Organization that it said will help expand its fiber network across the country.

“We spent a long time trying to find investment partners who believe in what we were doing, trust our process, and see the future of how we could help bridge the digital divide that currently exists across America. We found those partners with Stephens and TPO,” Brian Snider, founder and CEO of Lit, said in a press release.

The project will leverage the company’s subsidiary Medina Fiber in Medina County, Ohio, giving municipalities the ability to implement next-generation connectivity for their residents, the company said.

With the new investments, “we will accelerate the rollout of Medina Fiber and look to future markets where our unique business model can thrive,” Lit Communities said in the release.

“Stephens and TPO have been true partners, and our teams have felt like a cohesive unit from the start. We look forward to working closely together to expand Lit connectivity nationwide.”

Clubhouse hack exposes inner risks with app

A security breach of the popular audio chat app Clubhouse is forcing the company to relook at who manages its traffic.

The app’s cybersecurity came into question last week after a hacker livestreamed several rooms, which are supposed to be private and between only those invited in the conversation. Following the breach, the app provided no update on how the hacker could gain access but promised better security.

Those security enhancements include adding cryptography and additional blocks to avoid having servers located in China, whose Agora Inc. manages the app’s data traffic and audio production and hiring a third-party security company to review the new app updates. Clubhouse officials said that the app only stores audio or users’ data when necessary for billing purposes and wire monitoring.

Clubhouse relies on the Shanghai-based startup to handle much of its back-end operations and infrastructure, according to Alex Stamos, director of the Stanford Internet Observatory and Facebook’s former security chief. Some are concerned that could lead to Chinese authorities cracking down on dissidents. The SIO has said that the Communist government could easily intercept this data.

That’s because Agora has the legal duty to help Chinese authorities to find the source of audios. Agora told Bloomberg News reporters Jamie Tarabay and Kartikay Mehrotra that it does not “store or share personally identifiable information” for any of its clients, of which Clubhouse is just one.

COVID-19 broadband programs to close digital divide

Sens. Angus King, Maggie Hassan and Mark Warner sent a letter on February 25 to the Federal Communications Commission with a view to guiding the process of administering the $3.2-billion Emergency Broadband Benefit Program and beyond.

The letter sets out a number of recommendations, including ensuring that the funding outlives the pandemic and informs future spending policy on bridging the digital divide; expanding the eligibility criteria for funding to ensure the broadest base gets support, include new providers and customers; ensuring that EBBP funding is accessible and streamlined while also including cost-sharing with local service providers; and collaborating with state and local and institutions for outreach and educational opportunities.

On February 22, Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel released proposed rules on how to administer the program, including opening up the benefit to multiple different broadband providers and using other subsidy benefits Americans received to determine who needs help the most.

New lobbyist at the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association

Former Senate legislative director Eric Slee was named the new director of government affairs for the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association on Monday.

With 15 years of experience in the public sector, building connections, and serving as a primary advisor to the Senator on policy matters, Slee will help manage WISPA’s growing state and local, grassroots, and WISPA political action committee portfolios.

“I have a keen understanding of the communications industry and know what it takes to communicate in clear, concise, and effective ways so that legislators know what a given issue fundamentally means to their constituents,” Slee said.  “WISPs offer the promise of prosperity to Americans – rural and urban – and I am truly excited to be part of the growing and vibrant team here at WISPA.”

Continue Reading

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