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Section 230

Section 230 Reform Requires Citizen Participation, Says Sen. Amy Klobuchar

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Screenshot from the webinar

In the conversation to reform Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which governs liability for internet intermediaries, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, said Tuesday the public must get involved.

“We can’t fight Google and other million-dollar companies with duct tape and Band-Aids,” Klobuchar said, speaking during a live event hosted by the tech publication The Verge on Tuesday.

“People will say dumb stuff,” she said, but “internet users need to lift their voices, actively participate in contacting their senators” to better inform them about what they think about reform.

The reasoning is that these voices are the ones who will be impacted the most.

The reform discussions — egged on by former President Donald Trump — reached a fever pitch when some of Trump’s misleading tweets were labelled by Twitter with accompanying factual information about the issue he tweeted about. Other platforms followed suit.

Early last month, Klobuchar was joined by other senate democrats in proposing their own changes to Section 230, called the SAFE TECH Act.

The proposal would generally keep internet companies free from liability on content their users post, except for paid content, such as advertising that they financially benefit from.

Reporter Samuel Triginelli was born in Brazil and grew up speaking Portuguese and English, and later learned French and Spanish. He studied communications at Brigham Young University, where he also worked as a product administrator and UX/UI designer. He wants a world with better internet access for all.

Antitrust

Section 230 Has Coddled Big Tech For Too Long, Says Co-Author of Book on Amazon

Co-author of “The Amazon Jungle” says Section 230 has allowed Big Tech to get away with far too much.

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"The Amazon Jungle" co-author Jason Boyce

In the conversation to reform Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which governs liability for internet intermediaries, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, said Tuesday the public must get involved.

“We can’t fight Google and other million-dollar companies with duct tape and Band-Aids,” Klobuchar said, speaking during a live event hosted by the tech publication The Verge on Tuesday.

“People will say dumb stuff,” she said, but “internet users need to lift their voices, actively participate in contacting their senators” to better inform them about what they think about reform.

The reasoning is that these voices are the ones who will be impacted the most.

The reform discussions — egged on by former President Donald Trump — reached a fever pitch when some of Trump’s misleading tweets were labelled by Twitter with accompanying factual information about the issue he tweeted about. Other platforms followed suit.

Early last month, Klobuchar was joined by other senate democrats in proposing their own changes to Section 230, called the SAFE TECH Act.

The proposal would generally keep internet companies free from liability on content their users post, except for paid content, such as advertising that they financially benefit from.

Continue Reading

Section 230

Sen. Mike Lee Promotes Bills Valuing Federal Spectrum, Requiring Content Moderation Disclosures

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on

Screenshot of Mike Lee taken from Silicon Slopes event

In the conversation to reform Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which governs liability for internet intermediaries, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, said Tuesday the public must get involved.

“We can’t fight Google and other million-dollar companies with duct tape and Band-Aids,” Klobuchar said, speaking during a live event hosted by the tech publication The Verge on Tuesday.

“People will say dumb stuff,” she said, but “internet users need to lift their voices, actively participate in contacting their senators” to better inform them about what they think about reform.

The reasoning is that these voices are the ones who will be impacted the most.

The reform discussions — egged on by former President Donald Trump — reached a fever pitch when some of Trump’s misleading tweets were labelled by Twitter with accompanying factual information about the issue he tweeted about. Other platforms followed suit.

Early last month, Klobuchar was joined by other senate democrats in proposing their own changes to Section 230, called the SAFE TECH Act.

The proposal would generally keep internet companies free from liability on content their users post, except for paid content, such as advertising that they financially benefit from.

Continue Reading

Section 230

Pressed by Congress, Big Tech Defends Itself and Offers Few Solutions After Capitol Riot

Published

on

Photo of Google CEO Sundar Pichai from a December 2018 hearing before the House Judiciary Committee by Drew Clark

In the conversation to reform Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which governs liability for internet intermediaries, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, said Tuesday the public must get involved.

“We can’t fight Google and other million-dollar companies with duct tape and Band-Aids,” Klobuchar said, speaking during a live event hosted by the tech publication The Verge on Tuesday.

“People will say dumb stuff,” she said, but “internet users need to lift their voices, actively participate in contacting their senators” to better inform them about what they think about reform.

The reasoning is that these voices are the ones who will be impacted the most.

The reform discussions — egged on by former President Donald Trump — reached a fever pitch when some of Trump’s misleading tweets were labelled by Twitter with accompanying factual information about the issue he tweeted about. Other platforms followed suit.

Early last month, Klobuchar was joined by other senate democrats in proposing their own changes to Section 230, called the SAFE TECH Act.

The proposal would generally keep internet companies free from liability on content their users post, except for paid content, such as advertising that they financially benefit from.

Continue Reading

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