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Broadband Roundup

FCC Asked To Include States In Mapping, Maryland’s $300M For Broadband, Energy-Saving STB Agreement

Samuel Triginelli

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April 6, 2021 – Senate Democrats and independents are pushing the Federal Communications Commission to include state, regional and tribal governments in its development of more accurate broadband maps, according to a letter dated April 1.

“We strongly urge you to incorporate the voices of state, local and tribal governments and provide them with an opportunity to meaningfully challenge the data filed by internet service providers (ISPs),” the April 1 letter said. The letter advocates for the FCC to consider how to design a new broadband mapping data collection system.

Mapping has been a big issue with addressing gaps in broadband roll-out, as the FCC has previously relied on faulty data submitted by internet service providers.

“Many state and local governments know exactly who do and do not have access to reliable high-speed broadband within their communities,” the letter adds. “Some states have created their maps with granular data. Their valuable insights will be integral in creating accurate data maps that accurately reflect broadband services as experienced by consumers and ensuring that federal dollars are efficiently targeted and leveraged.”

States including Georgia have been building their own maps.

Maryland Puts $300 Million in Broadband

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan announced last week a $300-million investment in broadband and digital advancements, which comes from the $3.9 billion in federal COVID-19 relief funds.

“The question is not how much it will cost to bridge the digital divide, the question is how much will it cost if we do not act right now,” state senate President Bill Ferguson said during a press conference announcing the funding. “Who will be left out of the opportunities of today and tomorrow if we don’t have urgency around this issue?

“The digital divide is a solvable problem that requires investments in infrastructure, affordability, and adoption. We are pleased to hear that the State will allocate $300 million toward bridging the digital divide,” said Tia Price, director of the Baltimore Digital Equity Coalition.

The allocation of the $300 million is varied and is divided in three categories: physical infrastructure, affordability and adoption. Included in the spending package is $45 million for municipal broadband, $45 million for monthly broadband service subsidies, and $30 million for devices for qualified Maryland households.

The Abell Foundation estimates 23 percent of homes lack wireline home broadband services, and state leaders are prioritizing digital connectivity alongside unemployment insurance, schools, and transportation.

Energy-Saving Set-Top Box Voluntary Agreement Renewed Through 2025 

Consumer Technology Association and the Internet and Television Association announced last month that they will extend the voluntary agreement for ongoing improvement to the energy efficiency of set-top boxes through 2025.

In addition to saving consumers $7 billion in costs and preventing 39 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions through the end of 2019, the agreement includes new, tougher energy efficiency targets beginning in 2023, the agreement stated.

The total energy used by set-top boxes in the United States is projected to be one-third of what was originally used.

“The Department of Energy (DOE) welcomes the extension of the set-top box voluntary agreement and supports the continued efforts of our industry partners to improve the energy efficiency of these products and save consumers money on their energy bills,” said Kathleen Hogan, acting under secretary for science and energy.

“DOE appreciates the commitment by CTA and NCTA to study the impacts of the growth of cloud-based streaming services on electricity use across America and looks forward to future advances in energy-efficient technologies in this area.”

Signatories of the agreement include all major multichannel pay TV providers (AT&T/DIRECTV, Comcast, Charter, DISH, Verizon, Cox, Altice, and Frontier), major manufacturers (CommScope and Technicolor) and energy efficiency advocates (Natural Resources Defense Council and American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy).

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Hawley Calls For Ban On Large Corp Mergers, Chip Shortage Coming For Routers, Big Telecom Breakup

Derek Shumway

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Photo from the American Independent Institute

April 12, 2021 – Senator Josh Hawley, R-MO, shared with Axios a new proposal that would bar corporate giants from acquisitions and strengthen century-old antitrust laws.

“This country and this government shouldn’t be run by a few mega-corporations,” Hawley told Axios. The Republican Party “has got to become the party of trust-busting once again. You know, that’s a part of our history.”

Though he is among the Senate’s most conservative members, him attacking corporate power is not out of place when read with Senators Elizabeth Warren’s or Bernie Sanders’ agenda.

The “Trust-Busting for the Twenty-First Century Act” would include banning mergers and acquisitions by firms with a market cap over $100 billion. The threshold for prosecution under existing federal antitrust laws would be lowered, emphasizing the protection of competition instead of replacing consumer harm standards. Companies would also be required to forfeit all their profits resulting from monopolistic conduct that lose federal antitrust lawsuits. And the Federal Trade Commission would have new power to designate and regulate “dominant digital firms” in online markets.

If enacted, Hawley’s call to regulate mergers would affect far more than Silicon Valley. Its rules on mergers would also cover dozens of corporate giants in virtually every economic sector of the country.

If anyone is confused about the Republican “party of business” proposal being tough on business from one of its own kind, the Senator offered two responses: “’Trust-busting’ was a Republican concept originally, under Progressive-Era GOP president Teddy Roosevelt,” and “strong antitrust laws are ultimately about the sanctity of competition, and Republicans ought to embrace that.”

Axios reported that while his ideas might win some support from other populist Republicans, the broader party would need a sea-change in thinking to embrace it. Democrats, meanwhile, are likely to prefer their own bills, reported Axios.

Chip shortage could hit routers next

According to sources who spoke with Bloomberg, wireless routers “are poised to be the next piece of hardware to feel the effects of a global chip shortage currently disrupting the availability of the latest generation CPUs, GPUs, and game consoles.”

Internet service providers are already feeling the crunch in supply, with the sources stating ISPs are looking at delays for broadband router orders that will last up to 60 weeks—twice as long as the previous lead time.

PC Gamer reports that it has not seen any signs of chip shortages affecting standalone consumer routers for the of Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) and Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) models on shopping sites Amazon and Newegg, but warned things could turn on a dime, as other hardware has.

In some parts of the world, including Canada, carriers have complained that next-generation modems have been in short supply because of the chip shortage.

The reason behind the shortages? A series of unfortunate events, really. Karsten Gewecke, senior vice president of Zyxel, a major player in the router market, said the COVID-19 pandemic affected its supply chains. One of Zyxel’s manufacturing facilities in China temporarily stopped when COVID first hit over a year ago, and has been spotty ever since.

The situation has worsened due to increased consumer demand for broadband hardware as more people are working from home. And for a triple whammy: “Zyxel routers are among the cargo on Ever Given, the Evergreen-owned container ship that got stuck in the Suez Canal and has now been detained,” reported PC Gamer.

Gewecke said ISPs could run out of router inventory in the next several months due to these events.

Does big telecom need a break-up?

First it was big tech, and now big telecom is coming under scrutiny for its concentrated market power, as “too big to trust” accusations are leveled against internet service providers (ISPs).

The overwhelming majority of connections are now controlled by a cartel, just a few companies dubbed “Big Telecom” — AT&T, Verizon, CenturyLink, Comcast, and Charter, reports telecom veteran Bruce Kushnick on Medium. Often, in addition to controlling broadband access, these companies have a bundled package that also includes phone and cable TV services.

Kushnick argued that in the United States, bundled service packages are 5-20 times more expensive than most of Europe, averaging $215/month compared to Europe’s $23-50/month. He said that “Many countries have wireless services for $35 with 1000 GB or more, what he called “truly unlimited.” The US price is about $90 with an ‘unlimited’ plan of 50GB, whose speed is throttled after that threshold.

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Biden Presses Infrastructure Plan, FCC Date For Mapping, T-Mobile Fixed Wireless Service

Tim White

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April 8, 2021 – President Joe Biden wants America to think more broadly about what infrastructure means, countering Republican criticism against his new American Jobs Plan.

In a Wednesday speech, Biden reiterated his goals for the $2.3-trillion infrastructure package and urged a broader view of what infrastructure should mean for America, reported the Wall Street Journal.

The plan includes $100 billion for broadband, in addition to funding roads, bridges, ports, electric vehicles and charging stations, bringing manufacturing back to the U.S., and many other funding areas. The plan would be implemented over eight years and would raise the corporate tax rate from 21 percent to 28 percent.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, called Biden’s plan a “trojan horse” for tax increases, more debt and more spending than what he considers infrastructure. “I think infrastructure is roads, it’s bridges, it’s broadband. Beyond that, they’ve sort of thrown everything but the kitchen sink into it,” McConnell said.

“It still depends on roads and bridges, ports and airports, rail and mass transit. But it also depends on having reliable high-speed internet, in every home, because today’s high-speed internet is infrastructure,” Biden said.

The American Jobs Plan is just the first part of Biden’s infrastructure proposal. The second part – the “American Families Plan” – is due sometime in April.

FCC sets May 7, 2021 for Digital Opportunity Data Collection

The Federal Communications Commission issued a final rule Wednesday on the new Digital Opportunity Data Collection, setting May 7, 2021 as the effective date for the new broadband mapping system that will improve on the Form 477 data.

Broadband mapping has been a long-standing issue for many years, which has historically been based on inaccurate Form 477 data. A “served” area is one in which a 25 megabit per second (Mbps) download and 3 Mbps upload speed are offered. One of the problems is that if a single location within a census block receives that minimum service, it counts the entire census block as “served,” regardless of other broadband service in that area.

The new DODC system, or Broadband Serviceable Location Fabric, will use more granular data to improve broadband maps. This will include service providers distinguishing between residential and business served locations, connection speeds offered, and geographic coordinates for fixed wireless base stations.

“This dataset will be one of the building blocks of our data collection and will help give us an accurate and comprehensive picture of the availability of fixed broadband service throughout the country,” Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the FCC, said in a March 16 statement.

T-Mobile offers 5G home internet service

T-Mobile announced the launch of their home internet service Wednesday, offering wireless broadband service to up to 30 million locations across the U.S., reports the Verge.

The service plan costs $60 with autopay, or $65 without, has no data caps, and will offer service on their 5G or 4G network depending on available coverage, whichever is faster. “T-Mobile says most customers will experience speeds of 100Mbps, and all eligible customers should see average speeds of 50Mbps,” reported the Verge.

However, consumers may experience slower connection in congested areas.

The company has been touting home internet access since it acquired Sprint in 2019, saying the merger was necessary to develop a competitive internet service to other providers.

T-Mobile has been running a pilot program for home internet service since before the merger with Sprint happened.

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Broadband Roundup

Broadband As Civic Infrastructure, Telehealth Under Net Neutrality, Worre Studios Builds Virtual Arena

Derek Shumway

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April 7, 2021 – The German Marshall Fund is calling for broadband to be considered part of the civic infrastructure to draw more public and private partnerships and funding to connect more citizens.

Equity issues in communications policy have only worsened during the coronavirus pandemic, and redefining what helps citizens engage with their communities by including broadband to open-up opportunities for long-term success after the pandemic ends is critical, the GMF said in a late-March policy brief.

That includes forming a “digital new deal,” which would see the federal government play a stronger role in financing broadband for public purposes. Such a deal will also require that citizens have digital skills training, tech support, and information literacy to properly prepare for the future.

The government must also demonstrate strong commitment to oversight, enforcement, and assessment of progress toward goals for community connectivity. States also need to have the capacity for broadband planning and the resources to deliver these services via digital platforms, the policy brief states.

Coordinating with the private sector and all levels of government with communities to integrate broadband can create long-term solutions to close the digital divide.

“At a time when the nation faces a crisis of commitment to social and physical infrastructure, access to broadband carries the potential to create opportunities for individuals and communities,” the brief said.

California net neutrality law puts telehealth apps in focus

April 7, 2021 – Critics of California’s new net neutrality law are concerned that a telehealth app that doesn’t count against users’ monthly data allowance may be blocked because of zero-rating provisions in the act, according to Law360, but others say that won’t be the case.

The effective net neutrality law – a justice department legal challenge against which was revoked earlier this year — means internet service providers cannot influence on how traffic moves on their networks, including whether or not an app will be counted against data caps, also known as zero-rating.

In late March, news reports surfaced indicating that officials at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs were concerned that VA Video Connect, an app that provides free telehealth services to veterans that doesn’t count against subscribers’ mobile data caps, may be blocked or become no longer supported by ISPs. Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr tweeted on March 24 that, “Cutting off free mental health services for veterans is the unconscionable outcome demanded by regressive ‘net neutrality’ laws. This is wrong.”

AT&T already said it will end sponsored data arrangements nationwide to adhere to the law, to which critics said this could harm veterans struggling to get health care during the pandemic.

Worre Studios Builds Arena To Host Virtual Audience

Worre Studios announced Monday that a 25,000-square-foot circular arena located in Las Vegas, Nevada, that will host thousands of virtual attendees is now open.

Similar to how the NBA has been hosting viewers who are seen in broadcasts, the new studio featured a 360-degree interactive screen that allows a presenter to stand in the middle as if they are performing in front of a large audience.

Virtually every industry has been affected by the Coronavirus in some form or another. The events and entertainment industry lost approximately $30 billion in 2020 due to the pandemic, reported Worre Studios. And no one knows for sure when things will return to “normal,” especially for events. Worre Studios is trying to change that and built a 25,000 square foot circular arena that is designed to host hybrid events. The arena is located in the Southwest part of Las Vegas, Nevada.

The circular screen stage can be used for anything from standard business meetings to live television broadcasts, new product launches, and even live concerts and awards shows. The host or performers can also live interact with digital audience members, which uses Canvas software and Zoom video to connect up to 250,000 live interactive participants, in addition to being spacious enough to fit a 250-person live audience, making it a true hybrid experience.

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