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Digital Inclusion

Broadband Equity for All Coalition Sets Sights On Long-Term Broadband Benefit

In the wake of the Emergency Broadband Benefit program, a new group emerges.

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Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League

May 20, 2021—A coalition of more than 40 civil rights and consumer advocacy groups has assembled to address the digital divide and advocate for a long-term broadband benefit program.

In a statement on their website, the newly formed Broadband Equity for All coalition announced on Thursday, its support for a long-term, federally funded broadband benefit fund. This theoretical program would be the first of its kind, as it would far exceed the fiscal parameters established by the Emergency Broadband Benefit.

This proposed benefit would be managed by the Federal Communications Commission and would provide economically-disadvantaged communities with the financial support to secure reliable and affordable broadband, the tools to access it, and the knowledge to take advantage of it. Unlike the Emergency Broadband Benefit, which surpassed 100 million applicants in a week, this proposed benefit would be long-term, stretching beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that a broadband internet connection in the home is no longer a nicety; it is a necessity and is a matter of civil and human rights and economic justice,” said Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League—one of the many organizations in the coalition.

He pointed out that the digital divide disproportionately impacts communities of color and other minority groups—a sentiment that was echoed by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ CEO Sindy Benavides.

The coalition also pointed to the ten to 15 million students that are impacted by the homework gap, and the 40 percent of seniors without a broadband subscription that is sufficient to take advantage of the many telehealth services that have become a necessity during the pandemic.

Additionally, the coalition noted that people with disabilities are 20 percent less likely to have a broadband subscription or a device necessary to use it compared to non-disabled people.

As a child of American parents working abroad, Reporter Ben Kahn was raised as a third culture kid, growing up in five different countries, including the U.S.. He is a recent graduate of the University of Baltimore, where he majored in Policy, Politics, and International Affairs. He enjoys learning about foreign languages and cultures and can now speak poorly in more than one language.

Digital Inclusion

Black Churches 4 Broadband Brings Religious Fervor to Better Internet Access

Black churches are more than spiritual gathering places: They are power centers within the Black community.

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on

Photo of the late Martin Luther King, Jr.

May 20, 2021—A coalition of more than 40 civil rights and consumer advocacy groups has assembled to address the digital divide and advocate for a long-term broadband benefit program.

In a statement on their website, the newly formed Broadband Equity for All coalition announced on Thursday, its support for a long-term, federally funded broadband benefit fund. This theoretical program would be the first of its kind, as it would far exceed the fiscal parameters established by the Emergency Broadband Benefit.

This proposed benefit would be managed by the Federal Communications Commission and would provide economically-disadvantaged communities with the financial support to secure reliable and affordable broadband, the tools to access it, and the knowledge to take advantage of it. Unlike the Emergency Broadband Benefit, which surpassed 100 million applicants in a week, this proposed benefit would be long-term, stretching beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that a broadband internet connection in the home is no longer a nicety; it is a necessity and is a matter of civil and human rights and economic justice,” said Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League—one of the many organizations in the coalition.

He pointed out that the digital divide disproportionately impacts communities of color and other minority groups—a sentiment that was echoed by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ CEO Sindy Benavides.

The coalition also pointed to the ten to 15 million students that are impacted by the homework gap, and the 40 percent of seniors without a broadband subscription that is sufficient to take advantage of the many telehealth services that have become a necessity during the pandemic.

Additionally, the coalition noted that people with disabilities are 20 percent less likely to have a broadband subscription or a device necessary to use it compared to non-disabled people.

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Digital Inclusion

Senators Reintroduce Bipartisan Digital Equity Act

Sen. Murray re-introduces bi-partisan that would provide grants to states pushing for digital equity.

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on

Patty Murray, D-Washington

May 20, 2021—A coalition of more than 40 civil rights and consumer advocacy groups has assembled to address the digital divide and advocate for a long-term broadband benefit program.

In a statement on their website, the newly formed Broadband Equity for All coalition announced on Thursday, its support for a long-term, federally funded broadband benefit fund. This theoretical program would be the first of its kind, as it would far exceed the fiscal parameters established by the Emergency Broadband Benefit.

This proposed benefit would be managed by the Federal Communications Commission and would provide economically-disadvantaged communities with the financial support to secure reliable and affordable broadband, the tools to access it, and the knowledge to take advantage of it. Unlike the Emergency Broadband Benefit, which surpassed 100 million applicants in a week, this proposed benefit would be long-term, stretching beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that a broadband internet connection in the home is no longer a nicety; it is a necessity and is a matter of civil and human rights and economic justice,” said Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League—one of the many organizations in the coalition.

He pointed out that the digital divide disproportionately impacts communities of color and other minority groups—a sentiment that was echoed by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ CEO Sindy Benavides.

The coalition also pointed to the ten to 15 million students that are impacted by the homework gap, and the 40 percent of seniors without a broadband subscription that is sufficient to take advantage of the many telehealth services that have become a necessity during the pandemic.

Additionally, the coalition noted that people with disabilities are 20 percent less likely to have a broadband subscription or a device necessary to use it compared to non-disabled people.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Report Highlights Importance Of Satellite Technologies, Secure Data and Communications

The report on new technologies and data lays out importance of data security and satellite communications.

Published

on

Rep. Suzan DelBene of Washington

May 20, 2021—A coalition of more than 40 civil rights and consumer advocacy groups has assembled to address the digital divide and advocate for a long-term broadband benefit program.

In a statement on their website, the newly formed Broadband Equity for All coalition announced on Thursday, its support for a long-term, federally funded broadband benefit fund. This theoretical program would be the first of its kind, as it would far exceed the fiscal parameters established by the Emergency Broadband Benefit.

This proposed benefit would be managed by the Federal Communications Commission and would provide economically-disadvantaged communities with the financial support to secure reliable and affordable broadband, the tools to access it, and the knowledge to take advantage of it. Unlike the Emergency Broadband Benefit, which surpassed 100 million applicants in a week, this proposed benefit would be long-term, stretching beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that a broadband internet connection in the home is no longer a nicety; it is a necessity and is a matter of civil and human rights and economic justice,” said Marc Morial, CEO and President of the National Urban League—one of the many organizations in the coalition.

He pointed out that the digital divide disproportionately impacts communities of color and other minority groups—a sentiment that was echoed by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ CEO Sindy Benavides.

The coalition also pointed to the ten to 15 million students that are impacted by the homework gap, and the 40 percent of seniors without a broadband subscription that is sufficient to take advantage of the many telehealth services that have become a necessity during the pandemic.

Additionally, the coalition noted that people with disabilities are 20 percent less likely to have a broadband subscription or a device necessary to use it compared to non-disabled people.

Continue Reading

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