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Big Tech

FCC Commissioner Carr Says Big Tech Has Too Much Power To Determine What Information Is Seen

Brendan Carr said Big Tech can make critical decisions on who sees what on the internet.

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FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr

May 26, 2021—Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr said Tuesday that he’s concerned about the power of big tech to being able to remove applications like controversial chat website Parler.

The app, which is used by supporters of former President Donald Trump but has fostered an environment of hate-speech, was removed from the Apple and Google app stores in light of the Capitol riot of January 6. The platforms gave the app time to deal with its policies on those matters.

Carr said at a virtual event hosted by The Heritage Foundation that when technology companies have the power to pick and choose what to remove, it creates inherent biases and promotes an echo chamber, where Americans only hear one side of matter. He said there must be a push to promote more diverse opinions.

He noted that the big technology companies often point to their algorithms when called to account for “inconsistent content moderation and account suspension.” Facebook, for example, has said it removes thousands of groups and accounts, which often promote violence, from its platform regularly.

Carr noted the example of a New York Post article written about Hunter Biden’s dealings with Ukraine, the merits of which were dismissed and the story allegedly suppressed by big tech platforms.

“Big tech companies have been given too much power,” Carr said.

Reporter Sophie Draayer, a native Las Vegan, studied strategic communication and political science at the University of Utah. In her free time, she plays mahjong, learns new songs on the guitar, and binge-watches true-crime docuseries on Netflix.

Big Tech

Regulating Big Tech with State Laws Could Negatively Impact Customers

State regulation of technology companies could harm consumers, experts say.

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Screenshot of Eli Dourado, taken from event

May 26, 2021—Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr said Tuesday that he’s concerned about the power of big tech to being able to remove applications like controversial chat website Parler.

The app, which is used by supporters of former President Donald Trump but has fostered an environment of hate-speech, was removed from the Apple and Google app stores in light of the Capitol riot of January 6. The platforms gave the app time to deal with its policies on those matters.

Carr said at a virtual event hosted by The Heritage Foundation that when technology companies have the power to pick and choose what to remove, it creates inherent biases and promotes an echo chamber, where Americans only hear one side of matter. He said there must be a push to promote more diverse opinions.

He noted that the big technology companies often point to their algorithms when called to account for “inconsistent content moderation and account suspension.” Facebook, for example, has said it removes thousands of groups and accounts, which often promote violence, from its platform regularly.

Carr noted the example of a New York Post article written about Hunter Biden’s dealings with Ukraine, the merits of which were dismissed and the story allegedly suppressed by big tech platforms.

“Big tech companies have been given too much power,” Carr said.

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Big Tech

Rosenworcel Says Carr’s Big Tech Proposal for Universal Service Fund ‘Intriguing’

Forcing Big Tech to contribute to the Universal Service Fund is intriguing, but up to Congress, Rosenworcel says.

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May 26, 2021—Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr said Tuesday that he’s concerned about the power of big tech to being able to remove applications like controversial chat website Parler.

The app, which is used by supporters of former President Donald Trump but has fostered an environment of hate-speech, was removed from the Apple and Google app stores in light of the Capitol riot of January 6. The platforms gave the app time to deal with its policies on those matters.

Carr said at a virtual event hosted by The Heritage Foundation that when technology companies have the power to pick and choose what to remove, it creates inherent biases and promotes an echo chamber, where Americans only hear one side of matter. He said there must be a push to promote more diverse opinions.

He noted that the big technology companies often point to their algorithms when called to account for “inconsistent content moderation and account suspension.” Facebook, for example, has said it removes thousands of groups and accounts, which often promote violence, from its platform regularly.

Carr noted the example of a New York Post article written about Hunter Biden’s dealings with Ukraine, the merits of which were dismissed and the story allegedly suppressed by big tech platforms.

“Big tech companies have been given too much power,” Carr said.

Continue Reading

Antitrust

Institute for Technology and Innovation Foundation Panelists Defend Big Tech Against Antitrust Charges

During a panel hosted by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, three expert discussed the effect of antitrust legislation on big tech. The panelists all defended big tech from antitrust laws and urged many to be cautious about claiming they have the solution to regulating these complicated entities.

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Screenshot from the webinar

May 26, 2021—Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr said Tuesday that he’s concerned about the power of big tech to being able to remove applications like controversial chat website Parler.

The app, which is used by supporters of former President Donald Trump but has fostered an environment of hate-speech, was removed from the Apple and Google app stores in light of the Capitol riot of January 6. The platforms gave the app time to deal with its policies on those matters.

Carr said at a virtual event hosted by The Heritage Foundation that when technology companies have the power to pick and choose what to remove, it creates inherent biases and promotes an echo chamber, where Americans only hear one side of matter. He said there must be a push to promote more diverse opinions.

He noted that the big technology companies often point to their algorithms when called to account for “inconsistent content moderation and account suspension.” Facebook, for example, has said it removes thousands of groups and accounts, which often promote violence, from its platform regularly.

Carr noted the example of a New York Post article written about Hunter Biden’s dealings with Ukraine, the merits of which were dismissed and the story allegedly suppressed by big tech platforms.

“Big tech companies have been given too much power,” Carr said.

Continue Reading

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