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Infrastructure

Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal Lands on $65 Billion for Broadband

Joe Biden reveals bipartisan infrastructure package during press conference in front of White House.

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President Joe Biden

June 24, 2021 – President Joe Biden and ten senators, five from each party, announced Thursday they have reached an agreement to allocate $65 billion toward broadband infrastructure as part of a larger infrastructure package that has been under negotiation for weeks.

Biden’s American Jobs Plan in March had originally proposed $100 billion, but the White House had said it would be willing to go down to $65 billion to placate the Republicans.

“We applaud the news of a bipartisan deal on an historic infrastructure package,” Christina Mason, vice president of government affairs at the wireless industry association WISPA, said in a statement. “We continue to urge Congress and the White House to focus efforts on communities that have yet to gain access to meaningful connectivity.”

According to Reuters, the bill will be paid through various methods, including an estimated $100 billion in tax revenues, unused COVID-19 funds, and unemployment insurance funds being returned. The bill also includes nearly $579 billion in new spending.

The bill will cost approximately $1 trillion dollars over five years.

But Biden said he will not sign it unless a separate Democrat-led reconciliation legislation, which passed the House earlier this year and is before the Senate, can get through the upper chamber. That reconciliation legislation includes an additional $7 billion for broadband by way of the Emergency Connectivity Fund.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, made similar remarks about the compromise, suggesting that she will not even consider bringing the legislation to a vote until reconciliation is passed in the Senate.

Reporter Jasmine Campos, a native of California, studied political science and journalism at Azusa Pacific University. She worked as the news editor on her school newspaper and contributor for The College Fix. In her free time, she reads, catches up on the latest news or is binge-watching Friends.

Fiber

Speed Focus Could Harm Telecom Industry, Plume CCO Says at Fiber Connect 2021

Companies disagree about what fiber providers should prioritize, and whether hard standards should be set.

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Photo of panel during Fiber Connect 2021.

June 24, 2021 – President Joe Biden and ten senators, five from each party, announced Thursday they have reached an agreement to allocate $65 billion toward broadband infrastructure as part of a larger infrastructure package that has been under negotiation for weeks.

Biden’s American Jobs Plan in March had originally proposed $100 billion, but the White House had said it would be willing to go down to $65 billion to placate the Republicans.

“We applaud the news of a bipartisan deal on an historic infrastructure package,” Christina Mason, vice president of government affairs at the wireless industry association WISPA, said in a statement. “We continue to urge Congress and the White House to focus efforts on communities that have yet to gain access to meaningful connectivity.”

According to Reuters, the bill will be paid through various methods, including an estimated $100 billion in tax revenues, unused COVID-19 funds, and unemployment insurance funds being returned. The bill also includes nearly $579 billion in new spending.

The bill will cost approximately $1 trillion dollars over five years.

But Biden said he will not sign it unless a separate Democrat-led reconciliation legislation, which passed the House earlier this year and is before the Senate, can get through the upper chamber. That reconciliation legislation includes an additional $7 billion for broadband by way of the Emergency Connectivity Fund.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, made similar remarks about the compromise, suggesting that she will not even consider bringing the legislation to a vote until reconciliation is passed in the Senate.

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Wireless

Property Owners Highlight Role of Commercial Real Estate in Digital Infrastructure Deployment

Wireless push by FCC has led to higher capacity broadband throughout multi-tenant buildings.

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Photo of John Gilbert of Rudin Management Company from Connected Real Estate magazine

June 24, 2021 – President Joe Biden and ten senators, five from each party, announced Thursday they have reached an agreement to allocate $65 billion toward broadband infrastructure as part of a larger infrastructure package that has been under negotiation for weeks.

Biden’s American Jobs Plan in March had originally proposed $100 billion, but the White House had said it would be willing to go down to $65 billion to placate the Republicans.

“We applaud the news of a bipartisan deal on an historic infrastructure package,” Christina Mason, vice president of government affairs at the wireless industry association WISPA, said in a statement. “We continue to urge Congress and the White House to focus efforts on communities that have yet to gain access to meaningful connectivity.”

According to Reuters, the bill will be paid through various methods, including an estimated $100 billion in tax revenues, unused COVID-19 funds, and unemployment insurance funds being returned. The bill also includes nearly $579 billion in new spending.

The bill will cost approximately $1 trillion dollars over five years.

But Biden said he will not sign it unless a separate Democrat-led reconciliation legislation, which passed the House earlier this year and is before the Senate, can get through the upper chamber. That reconciliation legislation includes an additional $7 billion for broadband by way of the Emergency Connectivity Fund.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, made similar remarks about the compromise, suggesting that she will not even consider bringing the legislation to a vote until reconciliation is passed in the Senate.

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Fiber

‘If It’s Not Fiber, It’s Not Broadband’: C Spire Reflects on Broadband after Covid

Hu Meena argued for fiber as preferred technology, as debate rages about what Congress should focus on.

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Photo of Hu Meena speaking at Fiber Connect 2021.

June 24, 2021 – President Joe Biden and ten senators, five from each party, announced Thursday they have reached an agreement to allocate $65 billion toward broadband infrastructure as part of a larger infrastructure package that has been under negotiation for weeks.

Biden’s American Jobs Plan in March had originally proposed $100 billion, but the White House had said it would be willing to go down to $65 billion to placate the Republicans.

“We applaud the news of a bipartisan deal on an historic infrastructure package,” Christina Mason, vice president of government affairs at the wireless industry association WISPA, said in a statement. “We continue to urge Congress and the White House to focus efforts on communities that have yet to gain access to meaningful connectivity.”

According to Reuters, the bill will be paid through various methods, including an estimated $100 billion in tax revenues, unused COVID-19 funds, and unemployment insurance funds being returned. The bill also includes nearly $579 billion in new spending.

The bill will cost approximately $1 trillion dollars over five years.

But Biden said he will not sign it unless a separate Democrat-led reconciliation legislation, which passed the House earlier this year and is before the Senate, can get through the upper chamber. That reconciliation legislation includes an additional $7 billion for broadband by way of the Emergency Connectivity Fund.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-California, made similar remarks about the compromise, suggesting that she will not even consider bringing the legislation to a vote until reconciliation is passed in the Senate.

Continue Reading

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