Connect with us

Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity Framework Between Countries Key to Combatting Cyberattacks, Conference Hears

Countries can work together to solidify defenses against cyberattacks, a conference heard.

Published

on

Screenshot from Stimson Center panel on June 3

Jun 24, 2021—An agreement on policies between countries will be an important step toward mitigating cyberattacks, according to a panel of experts at a Stimson Center Webinar convened earlier this month.  

Broader diplomatic efforts between countries, according to experts, is what will make sanctions more effective and deter cyberattacks, the conference heard.

The comments come as the United States deals with the fallout of a number of cyberattacks on private companies. Software company SolarWinds and oil transport company Colonial Pipeline both succumbed to cyberattacks, the latter occurred shortly before President Joe Biden introduced a cybersecurity executive order that will establish a review board of private and public sector employees to analyze attacks.

The Stimson panel said it is up to governments and military agencies to work together to ensure their cyber defenses are resilient.

This is already being done in the European Union, as it works on stronger directives that give guidelines to the individual member states that need help protecting their cyber systems. Like climate, cyberattacks won’t stop at borders, but instead will spread further if defense mechanisms don’t happen inside the borders, the conference heard.

A framework between states is, therefore, needed to build the capacity required not only to combat existing cyberattacks but deter future ones as well, the conference heard.

Reporter Mike Ogunji is from Columbus, Ohio, and studied public relations and information technology at the University of Cincinnati. He has been involved in the Model United Nations and We The People. Mike enjoys books, basketball, broadband and exploring the backwoods.

Cybersecurity

House Energy Committee Approves Series of Cyber Bills to Improve Telecom Security

The committee approved five bills dealing with protecting networks and educating the public on cyberattacks.

Published

on

Frank Pallone Jr., D-New Jersey

Jun 24, 2021—An agreement on policies between countries will be an important step toward mitigating cyberattacks, according to a panel of experts at a Stimson Center Webinar convened earlier this month.  

Broader diplomatic efforts between countries, according to experts, is what will make sanctions more effective and deter cyberattacks, the conference heard.

The comments come as the United States deals with the fallout of a number of cyberattacks on private companies. Software company SolarWinds and oil transport company Colonial Pipeline both succumbed to cyberattacks, the latter occurred shortly before President Joe Biden introduced a cybersecurity executive order that will establish a review board of private and public sector employees to analyze attacks.

The Stimson panel said it is up to governments and military agencies to work together to ensure their cyber defenses are resilient.

This is already being done in the European Union, as it works on stronger directives that give guidelines to the individual member states that need help protecting their cyber systems. Like climate, cyberattacks won’t stop at borders, but instead will spread further if defense mechanisms don’t happen inside the borders, the conference heard.

A framework between states is, therefore, needed to build the capacity required not only to combat existing cyberattacks but deter future ones as well, the conference heard.

Continue Reading

Cybersecurity

Senator Recommends Mandatory Breach Reporting for Companies

Angus King, I-Maine, also said companies should go through hack testing to beef up security.

Published

on

U.S. Senator Angus King, I-Maine

Jun 24, 2021—An agreement on policies between countries will be an important step toward mitigating cyberattacks, according to a panel of experts at a Stimson Center Webinar convened earlier this month.  

Broader diplomatic efforts between countries, according to experts, is what will make sanctions more effective and deter cyberattacks, the conference heard.

The comments come as the United States deals with the fallout of a number of cyberattacks on private companies. Software company SolarWinds and oil transport company Colonial Pipeline both succumbed to cyberattacks, the latter occurred shortly before President Joe Biden introduced a cybersecurity executive order that will establish a review board of private and public sector employees to analyze attacks.

The Stimson panel said it is up to governments and military agencies to work together to ensure their cyber defenses are resilient.

This is already being done in the European Union, as it works on stronger directives that give guidelines to the individual member states that need help protecting their cyber systems. Like climate, cyberattacks won’t stop at borders, but instead will spread further if defense mechanisms don’t happen inside the borders, the conference heard.

A framework between states is, therefore, needed to build the capacity required not only to combat existing cyberattacks but deter future ones as well, the conference heard.

Continue Reading

Cybersecurity

Companies Give Kudos to Amazon Web Services, As Competition in Cloud Security Heats Up

Experts praise Amazon’s cloud services, as competition in the space accelerates and as the feds tackle cybersecurity concerns.

Published

on

Bill Vass, Vice President of engineering with AWS

Jun 24, 2021—An agreement on policies between countries will be an important step toward mitigating cyberattacks, according to a panel of experts at a Stimson Center Webinar convened earlier this month.  

Broader diplomatic efforts between countries, according to experts, is what will make sanctions more effective and deter cyberattacks, the conference heard.

The comments come as the United States deals with the fallout of a number of cyberattacks on private companies. Software company SolarWinds and oil transport company Colonial Pipeline both succumbed to cyberattacks, the latter occurred shortly before President Joe Biden introduced a cybersecurity executive order that will establish a review board of private and public sector employees to analyze attacks.

The Stimson panel said it is up to governments and military agencies to work together to ensure their cyber defenses are resilient.

This is already being done in the European Union, as it works on stronger directives that give guidelines to the individual member states that need help protecting their cyber systems. Like climate, cyberattacks won’t stop at borders, but instead will spread further if defense mechanisms don’t happen inside the borders, the conference heard.

A framework between states is, therefore, needed to build the capacity required not only to combat existing cyberattacks but deter future ones as well, the conference heard.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

 

Trending