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FCC’s Rosenworcel Acknowledges Demand for Covid Broadband Program Will ‘Outlast’ Crisis

Acting chairwoman said the need for the Emergency Broadband Benefit will outlive the pandemic.

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June 30, 2021–The increasing number of households that have so far enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program suggests the program’s demand will go beyond the life of the pandemic, the agency’s Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said Tuesday.

“With these enrollment numbers at this stage of the crisis, I think it’s clear that the need for the Emergency Broadband Benefit or something similar will outlast Covid-19,” Rosenworcel said at a discussion with the Benton Institute on Tuesday.

Over three million households have enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program since its launch last month. The temporary program provides a subsidy of up-to $50 per month—or $75 in tribal areas—to pay for internet service.

The EBB program will expire when the entirety of the $3.2-billion budget is used up or six months after the pandemic ends, whichever is sooner.

Rosenworcel’s comments come as experts call on Congress to recognize the need for long-term solutions to ensure students, who must complete virtual studies at home, are supplied with adequate connectivity.

“There’s a window of opportunity while the Emergency Broadband Benefit is available to design a permanent broadband benefit that will keep low-income folks connected once the program ends,” said Joi Chaney, executive director of the National Urban League’s Washington Bureau at a Connected Roundtable this month.

“Now is the time—while policymakers are acutely aware of the plight of the disconnected—to solve both rural and urban problems contributing to the digital divide.”

Reporter Sophie Draayer, a native Las Vegan, studied strategic communication and political science at the University of Utah. In her free time, she plays mahjong, learns new songs on the guitar, and binge-watches true-crime docuseries on Netflix.

Education

Broadband Breakfast CEO Drew Clark and BroadbandNow’s John Busby Speak on Libraries and Broadband

Friday’s Gigabit Libraries Network conversation will feature Drew Clark of Broadband Breakfast and John Busby of BroadbandNow.

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June 30, 2021–The increasing number of households that have so far enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program suggests the program’s demand will go beyond the life of the pandemic, the agency’s Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said Tuesday.

“With these enrollment numbers at this stage of the crisis, I think it’s clear that the need for the Emergency Broadband Benefit or something similar will outlast Covid-19,” Rosenworcel said at a discussion with the Benton Institute on Tuesday.

Over three million households have enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program since its launch last month. The temporary program provides a subsidy of up-to $50 per month—or $75 in tribal areas—to pay for internet service.

The EBB program will expire when the entirety of the $3.2-billion budget is used up or six months after the pandemic ends, whichever is sooner.

Rosenworcel’s comments come as experts call on Congress to recognize the need for long-term solutions to ensure students, who must complete virtual studies at home, are supplied with adequate connectivity.

“There’s a window of opportunity while the Emergency Broadband Benefit is available to design a permanent broadband benefit that will keep low-income folks connected once the program ends,” said Joi Chaney, executive director of the National Urban League’s Washington Bureau at a Connected Roundtable this month.

“Now is the time—while policymakers are acutely aware of the plight of the disconnected—to solve both rural and urban problems contributing to the digital divide.”

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Education

FCC Opens Emergency Connectivity Fund for Applications

The FCC is now accepting applications for the historic $7-billion Emergency Connectivity Fund to help get students connected.

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FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel

June 30, 2021–The increasing number of households that have so far enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program suggests the program’s demand will go beyond the life of the pandemic, the agency’s Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said Tuesday.

“With these enrollment numbers at this stage of the crisis, I think it’s clear that the need for the Emergency Broadband Benefit or something similar will outlast Covid-19,” Rosenworcel said at a discussion with the Benton Institute on Tuesday.

Over three million households have enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program since its launch last month. The temporary program provides a subsidy of up-to $50 per month—or $75 in tribal areas—to pay for internet service.

The EBB program will expire when the entirety of the $3.2-billion budget is used up or six months after the pandemic ends, whichever is sooner.

Rosenworcel’s comments come as experts call on Congress to recognize the need for long-term solutions to ensure students, who must complete virtual studies at home, are supplied with adequate connectivity.

“There’s a window of opportunity while the Emergency Broadband Benefit is available to design a permanent broadband benefit that will keep low-income folks connected once the program ends,” said Joi Chaney, executive director of the National Urban League’s Washington Bureau at a Connected Roundtable this month.

“Now is the time—while policymakers are acutely aware of the plight of the disconnected—to solve both rural and urban problems contributing to the digital divide.”

Continue Reading

Education

How Gamifying Education is Keeping Students Engaged

Experts sing the praises of gaming in education.

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on

June 30, 2021–The increasing number of households that have so far enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program suggests the program’s demand will go beyond the life of the pandemic, the agency’s Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said Tuesday.

“With these enrollment numbers at this stage of the crisis, I think it’s clear that the need for the Emergency Broadband Benefit or something similar will outlast Covid-19,” Rosenworcel said at a discussion with the Benton Institute on Tuesday.

Over three million households have enrolled in the Federal Communications Commissions’ Emergency Broadband Benefit program since its launch last month. The temporary program provides a subsidy of up-to $50 per month—or $75 in tribal areas—to pay for internet service.

The EBB program will expire when the entirety of the $3.2-billion budget is used up or six months after the pandemic ends, whichever is sooner.

Rosenworcel’s comments come as experts call on Congress to recognize the need for long-term solutions to ensure students, who must complete virtual studies at home, are supplied with adequate connectivity.

“There’s a window of opportunity while the Emergency Broadband Benefit is available to design a permanent broadband benefit that will keep low-income folks connected once the program ends,” said Joi Chaney, executive director of the National Urban League’s Washington Bureau at a Connected Roundtable this month.

“Now is the time—while policymakers are acutely aware of the plight of the disconnected—to solve both rural and urban problems contributing to the digital divide.”

Continue Reading

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