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Spectrum

Companies Clash Over Spectrum Sharing in 12 GHz Spectrum Band

Satellite service provider Dish, which is open to 12 GHz for mobile, recently signed a network sharing deal with AT&T.

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Screenshot from Broadband Breakfast Live Online episode on July 14.

July 19, 2021—While some experts believe that the 12 GHz spectrum band is a natural space for 5G to expand into, others remain unconvinced that doing so would not interrupt incumbent usage.

Broadband Breakfast convened a panel of experts on July 14 as part of its Broadband Breakfast Live Online event on “Spectrum for 5G, LEOs and the Future of the 12 GigaHertz (GHz) Band.”

Though the 12 GHz band has been used up to this point for low-earth orbit satellite networks, there has recently been debate over converting some of the band for terrestrial mobile use—a move that has frustrated some incumbents who assert that terrestrial mobile use would interfere with satellite services.

Eric Graham, the director of government and regulatory engagement for satellite provider OneWeb, described the effort to expand usage of the 12 GHz band as uncertain at best, arguing that new mobile devices operating in the band would create harmful and unpredictable interference.

“We use a very low level of power in the [non-geostationary-satellite orbit, fixed-satellite service] world,” Graham explained. “By the time the satellite signal reaches Earth from 1,200 kilometers away, that signal is very weak, and a terrestrial mobile device—your smartphone or other device—will wipe out that signal to the user terminal.”

According to Graham, there was a consensus at the conclusion of the reply comment round on this issue at the FCC. “Everyone had agreed that it was impossible for terrestrial mobile to coexist with the incumbents.” He stated that it has only been within the last year that proponents of expanding access to the band “found a way to create a study that purports to support coexistence.”

The argument for flexible use

Not everyone was convinced of Graham’s position, however. Co-founder and CEO of RS Access Noah Campbell argued that coexistence is not only possible but is vital to 5G deployment in the U.S. RS Access penned the first technical feasibility study that they argue proves that the 12 GHz band could host both mobile terrestrial devices and satellite services.

Cambell pointed out that the 12 GHz band is unique because it represents a significant swath of spectrum (500 MHz), despite only being licensed for one way service.

“In the context of 2021’s technology landscape that is absolutely insane,” he said. “[The FCC] would never license a frequency that way ever again. So, these are antiquated rules that really do not make sense from a technology standpoint, and do not make sense from a usage standpoint.”

Jeffrey Blum shared Cambell’s assessment of the 12 GHz. As the executive vice president for external and legislative affairs for Dish Network, Blum indicated Dish’s willingness to work with incumbents in the band.

“We do not want to fight, we want to share,” he said. Dish itself is a 12 GHz incumbent and has been operating satellites in the band since 1995 for over eight-million subscribers.

“We would not want to do anything at all to jeopardize our eight-million subscribers. We are confident that [[non-geostationary-satellite orbit, direct broadcast satellite], and mobile terrestrial uses can coexist.”

In fact, on the day of the live event, Dish announced a 10-year, $5-billion network sharing deal with AT&T to bolster its fledgling 5G network, according to a regulatory filing.

The deal would see AT&T provide support for Dish’s Boost Mobile by providing it with voice and messaging services. To do this, AT&T would be able to use bands of spectrum to which Dish holds licenses—both for their own use and Boost Mobile’s.

If the rules are successfully changed by the FCC, this would include the 12 GHz band.

Dish was able to obtain mobile wireless assets as part of a regulatory deal to approve the T-Mobile-Sprint merger that was completed last year.

In June, Dish announced a deal with Dell Technologies to launch the 5G network based on open radio access network and cloud technologies. Dish began accepting sign-ups for its 5G network that month.

Blum also struck back against the press’s title of the “Battle of the Billionaires.” He stated that DISH does not view the situation that way, and that this effort should only be viewed as a method to update outdated rules.

He pointed to all the technological advancements that have been made since the rules were originally established and, coupled with the need for the U.S. to lead 5G deployment, “the importance of 5G and 5G leadership to our country is essential,” Blum said.

The FCC still must make a decision regarding the 12 GHz band. Though Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel has historically been supportive of spectrum sharing initiatives, she has not yet publicly indicated whether she would support such an initiative in the 12 GHz band.

As a child of American parents working abroad, Reporter Ben Kahn was raised as a third culture kid, growing up in five different countries, including the U.S.. He is a recent graduate of the University of Baltimore, where he majored in Policy, Politics, and International Affairs. He enjoys learning about foreign languages and cultures and can now speak poorly in more than one language.

Spectrum

Spectrum Decisions Becoming Increasingly Important for Future: FCC’s Simington

FCC Commissioner Nathan Simington said focus on spectrum decision will become increasingly important for digital success.

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FCC Commissioner Nathan Simington

July 19, 2021—While some experts believe that the 12 GHz spectrum band is a natural space for 5G to expand into, others remain unconvinced that doing so would not interrupt incumbent usage.

Broadband Breakfast convened a panel of experts on July 14 as part of its Broadband Breakfast Live Online event on “Spectrum for 5G, LEOs and the Future of the 12 GigaHertz (GHz) Band.”

Though the 12 GHz band has been used up to this point for low-earth orbit satellite networks, there has recently been debate over converting some of the band for terrestrial mobile use—a move that has frustrated some incumbents who assert that terrestrial mobile use would interfere with satellite services.

Eric Graham, the director of government and regulatory engagement for satellite provider OneWeb, described the effort to expand usage of the 12 GHz band as uncertain at best, arguing that new mobile devices operating in the band would create harmful and unpredictable interference.

“We use a very low level of power in the [non-geostationary-satellite orbit, fixed-satellite service] world,” Graham explained. “By the time the satellite signal reaches Earth from 1,200 kilometers away, that signal is very weak, and a terrestrial mobile device—your smartphone or other device—will wipe out that signal to the user terminal.”

According to Graham, there was a consensus at the conclusion of the reply comment round on this issue at the FCC. “Everyone had agreed that it was impossible for terrestrial mobile to coexist with the incumbents.” He stated that it has only been within the last year that proponents of expanding access to the band “found a way to create a study that purports to support coexistence.”

The argument for flexible use

Not everyone was convinced of Graham’s position, however. Co-founder and CEO of RS Access Noah Campbell argued that coexistence is not only possible but is vital to 5G deployment in the U.S. RS Access penned the first technical feasibility study that they argue proves that the 12 GHz band could host both mobile terrestrial devices and satellite services.

Cambell pointed out that the 12 GHz band is unique because it represents a significant swath of spectrum (500 MHz), despite only being licensed for one way service.

“In the context of 2021’s technology landscape that is absolutely insane,” he said. “[The FCC] would never license a frequency that way ever again. So, these are antiquated rules that really do not make sense from a technology standpoint, and do not make sense from a usage standpoint.”

Jeffrey Blum shared Cambell’s assessment of the 12 GHz. As the executive vice president for external and legislative affairs for Dish Network, Blum indicated Dish’s willingness to work with incumbents in the band.

“We do not want to fight, we want to share,” he said. Dish itself is a 12 GHz incumbent and has been operating satellites in the band since 1995 for over eight-million subscribers.

“We would not want to do anything at all to jeopardize our eight-million subscribers. We are confident that [[non-geostationary-satellite orbit, direct broadcast satellite], and mobile terrestrial uses can coexist.”

In fact, on the day of the live event, Dish announced a 10-year, $5-billion network sharing deal with AT&T to bolster its fledgling 5G network, according to a regulatory filing.

The deal would see AT&T provide support for Dish’s Boost Mobile by providing it with voice and messaging services. To do this, AT&T would be able to use bands of spectrum to which Dish holds licenses—both for their own use and Boost Mobile’s.

If the rules are successfully changed by the FCC, this would include the 12 GHz band.

Dish was able to obtain mobile wireless assets as part of a regulatory deal to approve the T-Mobile-Sprint merger that was completed last year.

In June, Dish announced a deal with Dell Technologies to launch the 5G network based on open radio access network and cloud technologies. Dish began accepting sign-ups for its 5G network that month.

Blum also struck back against the press’s title of the “Battle of the Billionaires.” He stated that DISH does not view the situation that way, and that this effort should only be viewed as a method to update outdated rules.

He pointed to all the technological advancements that have been made since the rules were originally established and, coupled with the need for the U.S. to lead 5G deployment, “the importance of 5G and 5G leadership to our country is essential,” Blum said.

The FCC still must make a decision regarding the 12 GHz band. Though Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel has historically been supportive of spectrum sharing initiatives, she has not yet publicly indicated whether she would support such an initiative in the 12 GHz band.

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Spectrum

Explainer: Is Spectrum Sharing a Key to Broader Connectivity Goals?

In the second in a series of explainers, Broadband Breakfast looks at the quickly emerging topic of spectrum sharing, as 5G ramps up against the finite resource.

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Image from Policy Impact Partners

July 19, 2021—While some experts believe that the 12 GHz spectrum band is a natural space for 5G to expand into, others remain unconvinced that doing so would not interrupt incumbent usage.

Broadband Breakfast convened a panel of experts on July 14 as part of its Broadband Breakfast Live Online event on “Spectrum for 5G, LEOs and the Future of the 12 GigaHertz (GHz) Band.”

Though the 12 GHz band has been used up to this point for low-earth orbit satellite networks, there has recently been debate over converting some of the band for terrestrial mobile use—a move that has frustrated some incumbents who assert that terrestrial mobile use would interfere with satellite services.

Eric Graham, the director of government and regulatory engagement for satellite provider OneWeb, described the effort to expand usage of the 12 GHz band as uncertain at best, arguing that new mobile devices operating in the band would create harmful and unpredictable interference.

“We use a very low level of power in the [non-geostationary-satellite orbit, fixed-satellite service] world,” Graham explained. “By the time the satellite signal reaches Earth from 1,200 kilometers away, that signal is very weak, and a terrestrial mobile device—your smartphone or other device—will wipe out that signal to the user terminal.”

According to Graham, there was a consensus at the conclusion of the reply comment round on this issue at the FCC. “Everyone had agreed that it was impossible for terrestrial mobile to coexist with the incumbents.” He stated that it has only been within the last year that proponents of expanding access to the band “found a way to create a study that purports to support coexistence.”

The argument for flexible use

Not everyone was convinced of Graham’s position, however. Co-founder and CEO of RS Access Noah Campbell argued that coexistence is not only possible but is vital to 5G deployment in the U.S. RS Access penned the first technical feasibility study that they argue proves that the 12 GHz band could host both mobile terrestrial devices and satellite services.

Cambell pointed out that the 12 GHz band is unique because it represents a significant swath of spectrum (500 MHz), despite only being licensed for one way service.

“In the context of 2021’s technology landscape that is absolutely insane,” he said. “[The FCC] would never license a frequency that way ever again. So, these are antiquated rules that really do not make sense from a technology standpoint, and do not make sense from a usage standpoint.”

Jeffrey Blum shared Cambell’s assessment of the 12 GHz. As the executive vice president for external and legislative affairs for Dish Network, Blum indicated Dish’s willingness to work with incumbents in the band.

“We do not want to fight, we want to share,” he said. Dish itself is a 12 GHz incumbent and has been operating satellites in the band since 1995 for over eight-million subscribers.

“We would not want to do anything at all to jeopardize our eight-million subscribers. We are confident that [[non-geostationary-satellite orbit, direct broadcast satellite], and mobile terrestrial uses can coexist.”

In fact, on the day of the live event, Dish announced a 10-year, $5-billion network sharing deal with AT&T to bolster its fledgling 5G network, according to a regulatory filing.

The deal would see AT&T provide support for Dish’s Boost Mobile by providing it with voice and messaging services. To do this, AT&T would be able to use bands of spectrum to which Dish holds licenses—both for their own use and Boost Mobile’s.

If the rules are successfully changed by the FCC, this would include the 12 GHz band.

Dish was able to obtain mobile wireless assets as part of a regulatory deal to approve the T-Mobile-Sprint merger that was completed last year.

In June, Dish announced a deal with Dell Technologies to launch the 5G network based on open radio access network and cloud technologies. Dish began accepting sign-ups for its 5G network that month.

Blum also struck back against the press’s title of the “Battle of the Billionaires.” He stated that DISH does not view the situation that way, and that this effort should only be viewed as a method to update outdated rules.

He pointed to all the technological advancements that have been made since the rules were originally established and, coupled with the need for the U.S. to lead 5G deployment, “the importance of 5G and 5G leadership to our country is essential,” Blum said.

The FCC still must make a decision regarding the 12 GHz band. Though Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel has historically been supportive of spectrum sharing initiatives, she has not yet publicly indicated whether she would support such an initiative in the 12 GHz band.

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Spectrum

FCC Acts to Expand Access to Spectrum Sharing in American Territories

Chairwoman Rosenworcel has been a longtime supporter of spectrum sharing, and these actions advance that aspect of her agenda.

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Illustration from SDX Central

July 19, 2021—While some experts believe that the 12 GHz spectrum band is a natural space for 5G to expand into, others remain unconvinced that doing so would not interrupt incumbent usage.

Broadband Breakfast convened a panel of experts on July 14 as part of its Broadband Breakfast Live Online event on “Spectrum for 5G, LEOs and the Future of the 12 GigaHertz (GHz) Band.”

Though the 12 GHz band has been used up to this point for low-earth orbit satellite networks, there has recently been debate over converting some of the band for terrestrial mobile use—a move that has frustrated some incumbents who assert that terrestrial mobile use would interfere with satellite services.

Eric Graham, the director of government and regulatory engagement for satellite provider OneWeb, described the effort to expand usage of the 12 GHz band as uncertain at best, arguing that new mobile devices operating in the band would create harmful and unpredictable interference.

“We use a very low level of power in the [non-geostationary-satellite orbit, fixed-satellite service] world,” Graham explained. “By the time the satellite signal reaches Earth from 1,200 kilometers away, that signal is very weak, and a terrestrial mobile device—your smartphone or other device—will wipe out that signal to the user terminal.”

According to Graham, there was a consensus at the conclusion of the reply comment round on this issue at the FCC. “Everyone had agreed that it was impossible for terrestrial mobile to coexist with the incumbents.” He stated that it has only been within the last year that proponents of expanding access to the band “found a way to create a study that purports to support coexistence.”

The argument for flexible use

Not everyone was convinced of Graham’s position, however. Co-founder and CEO of RS Access Noah Campbell argued that coexistence is not only possible but is vital to 5G deployment in the U.S. RS Access penned the first technical feasibility study that they argue proves that the 12 GHz band could host both mobile terrestrial devices and satellite services.

Cambell pointed out that the 12 GHz band is unique because it represents a significant swath of spectrum (500 MHz), despite only being licensed for one way service.

“In the context of 2021’s technology landscape that is absolutely insane,” he said. “[The FCC] would never license a frequency that way ever again. So, these are antiquated rules that really do not make sense from a technology standpoint, and do not make sense from a usage standpoint.”

Jeffrey Blum shared Cambell’s assessment of the 12 GHz. As the executive vice president for external and legislative affairs for Dish Network, Blum indicated Dish’s willingness to work with incumbents in the band.

“We do not want to fight, we want to share,” he said. Dish itself is a 12 GHz incumbent and has been operating satellites in the band since 1995 for over eight-million subscribers.

“We would not want to do anything at all to jeopardize our eight-million subscribers. We are confident that [[non-geostationary-satellite orbit, direct broadcast satellite], and mobile terrestrial uses can coexist.”

In fact, on the day of the live event, Dish announced a 10-year, $5-billion network sharing deal with AT&T to bolster its fledgling 5G network, according to a regulatory filing.

The deal would see AT&T provide support for Dish’s Boost Mobile by providing it with voice and messaging services. To do this, AT&T would be able to use bands of spectrum to which Dish holds licenses—both for their own use and Boost Mobile’s.

If the rules are successfully changed by the FCC, this would include the 12 GHz band.

Dish was able to obtain mobile wireless assets as part of a regulatory deal to approve the T-Mobile-Sprint merger that was completed last year.

In June, Dish announced a deal with Dell Technologies to launch the 5G network based on open radio access network and cloud technologies. Dish began accepting sign-ups for its 5G network that month.

Blum also struck back against the press’s title of the “Battle of the Billionaires.” He stated that DISH does not view the situation that way, and that this effort should only be viewed as a method to update outdated rules.

He pointed to all the technological advancements that have been made since the rules were originally established and, coupled with the need for the U.S. to lead 5G deployment, “the importance of 5G and 5G leadership to our country is essential,” Blum said.

The FCC still must make a decision regarding the 12 GHz band. Though Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel has historically been supportive of spectrum sharing initiatives, she has not yet publicly indicated whether she would support such an initiative in the 12 GHz band.

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