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Ye Suspended From Twitter, FCC Issues Licenses, Streamlining ReConnect

The musician recently announced a 2024 bid for the presidency.

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Screenshot of a masked Ye during an interview Thursday with Alex Jones

December 2, 2022 – Twitter suspended the account of Ye, formerly Kanye West, after the musician on Thursday tweeted a graphic of a swastika inlaid in a Jewish star.

In recent months, Ye has repeatedly alleged that a Jewish cabal controls the media and other powerful institutions. Ye has claimed that Jews have attempted to silence, imprison, and financially ruin him. These statements have drawn widespread backlash from a wide range of political commentators and public figures.

The musician recently announced a 2024 bid for the presidency and sparked controversy by partnering with antisemitic internet personality Nick Fuentes and alt-right defender Milo Yiannopoulos.

In an appearance on conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ show on Thursday, Ye stated, “I like Hitler.” He later added, “I love Jewish people, but I also love Nazis.” Ye elected to wear a mask throughout the appearance.

“I tried my best,” Twitter’s new owner Elon Musk tweeted in response to a Twitter user. “Despite that, [Ye] again violated our rule against incitement to violence. Account will be suspended.”

Musk bought Twitter promising to institute more-permissive content moderation policies. However, despite the worries of Musk’s detractors and some of Musk’s own public statements, Ye’s suspension suggests Twitter will maintain at least basic guardrails against egregious content.

In October, before Musk’s takeover, Twitter restricted Ye’s account following a tweet in which he stated he would “go death con [sic] 3 on JEWISH PEOPLE.” He told Jones he sent the tweet under the influence of alcohol.

That same month, right-wing social-media platform Parler announced Ye planned to purchase the company. On Thursday, Parler announced that Ye and the company had “mutually agreed” to cancel the deal.

FCC grants spectrum licenses in 2.5 GHz band

The Federal Communications Commission granted 51 long-form applications and issued 650 spectrum licenses in the 2.5 GigaHertz (GHz), the agency announced Thursday.

“This is important spectrum, especially for rural America. I am grateful to our team for moving forward quickly but carefully in processing these applications,” said FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel. “We continue to focus on ensuring that mid-band spectrum is available for 5G and other next-generation wireless services.”

The FCC announced the winners of 2.5 GHz auction in September. The auction raised almost $420 million in net bids, the commission said.

Spectrum allocation has been of late a major issue for the FCC. In October, the agency approved a measuring seeking comment on the 12.7–13.25 GHz band, and Commissioner Brendan Carr the next month urged his colleagues to increase the rate of authorizations.

Over the summer, the commission released an updated memorandum of understanding with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, the overseer of federally used spectrum. Many experts have called on federal agencies to relinquish unused spectrum for use in the private sector, which, they say, would drive the expansion of next-generation technologies such as 5G.

Senators introduce bill to “streamline” USDA’s broadband programs

On behalf of a bipartisan coalition, Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., on Tuesday introduced a bill that would merge the Agriculture Department’s ReConnect program with the agency’s other broadband funding initiatives.

The coalition, including Sens. Ben Ray Lujan D-N.M., Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Deb Fischer, R-Neb., argue the Rural Internet Improvement Act would facilitate the efficient dispatch of funding to rural areas. The bill would also limit the disbursal of ReConnect funds to areas in which at least 90 percent of households lack broadband service.

“High-speed, reliable broadband is critical for New Mexico families and businesses, but the digital divide leaves far too many rural and Tribal communities behind,” Lujan said. “I’m proud to introduce this bipartisan legislation to make USDA programs more efficient and ensure that unserved communities receive the investments they need.” 

Multiple trade groups voice support for the bill.

“Sen. Thune has long been a leader in promoting and sustaining better access to broadband in rural areas, and NTCA appreciates his continued interest and leadership in examining ways to improve the workings of USDA’s ReConnect loan and grant program,” said Shirley Bloomfield, CEO of NTCA – The Rural Broadband Association.

“These are solid improvements to the current program that should be adopted as part of next year’s farm bill,” said NCTA – The Internet and Television Association, in a statement. “Deploying robust, affordable high-speed broadband to all Americans is a key priority for cable providers, so we look forward to working with members on passage of this legislation.”

Addition: The first story above has been updated with news about the cancellation of the Parler purchase by Ye.

Correction: A previous version of the third story above incorrectly stated that Shirley Bloomfield was CEO of NCTA. She is, in fact, the CEO of NTCA.  

 

Broadband Roundup

New Anti-China Bill in Congress, Outreach Program on Affordable Connectivity, Robocalls Decline

The Foreign Adversary Communications Transparency Act was introduced and is sponsored by both Republicans and Democrats.

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Photo of Elise Stafanik by CBS from the Republican National Convention in August 2020

February 7, 2023 – Three members of Congress have introduced legislation that would require the Federal Communications Commission to publish a list of licensed entities in the U.S. with ties to authoritarian regimes. 

The Foreign Adversary Communications Transparency Act also known as FACT Act was introduced by Reps. Elise Stefanik, R-New York, Ro Khanna, D-Calif., and Mike Gallagher, R-Wisconson, last week. 

“I applaud Congresswoman Stefanik’s, Congressman Khanna, and Congressman Gallagher’s strong leadership and thoughtful work to counter the malign influence of the Chinese Communist Party and other authoritarian state actors,” said FCC commissioner Brendan Carr in a statement. “This bipartisan legislation would strengthen American’s national security, and I encourage Congress to move quickly in passing this commonsense bill.

“Increasing visibility into entities with FCC authorizations that have relationships with authoritarian regimes would bring much needed transparency and help strengthen America’s communications networks against threats from malign actors,” Carr added.  

FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel had previously supported legislation that would have identified licensees with foreign ties. 

“Consumers deserve to trust that public airwaves aren’t being leased without their knowledge to foreign governments,” she said last year about a bill that would require television and radio broadcasters to reveal who is sponsoring foreign programming. 

Nonprofit to launch course on increasing Affordable Connectivity Program signups 

EducationSuperHighway, a national non-profit organization working to close the digital divide, will release a new learning course called LearnACP on Wednesday to help communities increase the adoption of the Affordable Connectivity Program

The $14.2 billion subsidy program, which provides a connectivity discount of $30 per month and $75 per month on tribal lands, still has millions of eligible Americans that are not signed up. EducationSuperHighway estimates that only about 30 percent of eligible households have signed up. 

“By training up trusted enrollment advocates, the course addresses the trust and enrollment barriers that keep 18 million Americans who have access to the internet offline,” Jessalyn Santos-Hall, director of marketing of EducationSuperHighway, said in a press release. 

Santos-Hall said in a press release that there’s a 45 percent application rejection rate, and many people can’t even finish the 30 to 45-minute enrollment process.

Robocall scams slowed, report claims

Robocall scams have been decreasing significantly due to government and regulatory action since early 2022, according to a report from Robokiller

The company that created an app to block spam calls and texts said it has observed a drop in the most malicious robocall categories: compared to December, January calls about car warranties decreased 35 percent, student loan calls went down 33 percent and home mortgage calls declined by 54 percent. 

“Americans got a bit of a reprieve from robo texts in January, as they returned to normal levels — 14 billion, compared to the 47 billion and 55 billion they received in November and December, respectively,” said Robokiller in a press release. “The change marks a 73% month-over-month decrease.

“In addition, with tax season coming up, Americans should watch out for IRS and social security-related scams as these tend to spike around this time of year,” Robokiller also said. 

The FCC has taken increased actions against robocalls. On December 21, the commission has proposed a nearly $300 million fine against an apparently fraudulent robocall and spoofing operation called “Cox/Jones Enterprise.” 

“So our message is clear to those who would follow in the footsteps of the auto warranty scammers – we are watching, we are working with our state counterparts, and we will find you, block you, and hold you accountable,” FCC chairman Rosenworcel said at the time. 

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CCA Wants Rip and Replace Funding, Executive Movements at Lumen, Rise Closes Buy of GI Partners

Industry associations have agreed that the FCC’s rip and replace program needs more funding.

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Photo of Sham Chotai, Lumen's new executive vice president of product and technology, via Lumen

February 6, 2023 – The Competitive Carriers Association has pressed the Federal Communications Commission on the need for more funding to replace equipment deemed a national security threat.

In a meeting late last month, the industry association said its members are struggling to complete the replacement of equipment that includes Chinese companies flagged by the commission and the government as unsafe because of a lack of funding.

“CCA discussed its members’ progress and participation in the Secure and Trusted Communications Networks Reimbursement Program (Program), and the challenges faced due to lack of full funding for the Program,” said a letter of the interaction published Thursday. “CCA discussed Congressional activity and timing for a potential solution to the funding issue, and emphasized the need for full funding as soon as possible. CCA discussed the consumer, competitive, and national security risks associated with the status quo.”

Congress allocated $1.9 billion to the “rip and replace” program as part of the Secure Networks Act. But the FCC had already identified a shortfall in the funds because requests from applicants far exceeded the amount available.

Last month, a report from the Federal Communications Commission said nearly half of respondents required to submit status reports on their replacement efforts complained about a lack of funding.

The head of the Telecommunications Industry Association had said the association was “stunned” to see that the spending package that would allow the government to run through September did not include additional money for the program.

The Rural Wireless Association had also requested further funding, as it claimed its members could not get loans to bridge them over to their statutory requirements.

Lumen mixes up executive leadership

Lumen Technologies announced Thursday changes to its executive team over the coming weeks.

Sham Chotai will be executive vice president of product and technology, Jay Barrows will be vice president of enterprise sales and public sector, and Ashley Haynes-Gaspar will include marketing organization her responsibilities and will take the title of executive vice president of customer experience officer in wholesale and international.

Chotai, who has previously worked in leadership positions at General Electric and Hewlett-Packard, will work to “evolve IT architectures and solutions.” Barrows, who also held leadership positions at GE and Red Hat, will help business and government on their digital futures.

“Lumen is focused on becoming customer obsessed, rapidly innovating valuable solutions, and aligning our business model to deliver amazing customer experiences,” Kate Johnson, Lumen’s president and CEO, said in a press release. “Sham and Jay will each play a critical role in modernizing our business and improving our execution capability to support these goals. Both are agile leaders who have driven successful strategic corporate transformations with impressive results.”

Fiber provider buys data infrastructure investor

Rise Broadband, which provides fiber infrastructure across 16 states, said Thursday it has completed the acquisition of data infrastructure investor GI Partners.

The deal is said to help the Englewood, Colorado-based Rise to expand its hybrid fiber-to-the-home and fixed wireless network.

“Rise Broadband provides essential broadband connectivity with a focus on customers in rural America,” Brendan Scollans, managing director and co-head of GI data infrastructure, said in a press release.

“Rise’s existing network infrastructure is uniquely positioned to execute a fiber expansion effort that will provide rural communities with next generation broadband service,” Scollans added.

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Satellites Expected to Increase, $30 Million From Emergency Connectivity Fund, NTIA 5G Challenge

The U.S. must remain a market leader in the satellite sector, said Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone

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Photo of Lago Argentino Department, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina

February 3, 2023 – The number of satellites in the communications marketplace will continue to increase, Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr, D- N.J., ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said during opening remarks at a Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing on Thursday.

“Wireless carriers and phone manufacturers continue to build this capability into their networks and phones,” Pallone said.

“Quite simply, failing to ensure that the United States remains a market leader in this sector risks our nation falling behind our counterparts across the globe, including China, in producing cutting-edge consumer innovations and fortifying our public safety and national security capabilities,” Pallone said.

FCC disbursing another $30 million from Emergency Connectivity Fund

The Federal Communications Commission announced on Wednesday that it will commit more than $30 million from the Emergency Connectivity Fund, which helps students stay connected to the internet when not in school.

The newly announced award is expected to fund applications from all three previous application windows, and will support more than 200 schools, 15 libraries, and 1 consortium.

Thus far, the program has provided support to approximately 10,000 schools, 10,000 libraries, and 100 consortia, plus more than =$12 million in connected devices. Around $6.5 billion in funding commitments have been approved to date, approximately $4.1 billion is supporting applications from the first funding window, $833 million from the second window and $1.6 billion from the third window.

$7 million competition by NTIA to promote development of 5G

National Telecommunications and Information Administration announced the launch of the 2023 5G Challenge with the Defense Department l. It’s purpose is to accelerate the adoption and development of an open and interoperable multi-vendor environment for the 5G wireless standard. “ Such an ecosystem will spur a more competitive and diverse telecommunications supply chain, drive down costs for consumers and network operators, and bolster U.S. leadership in the wireless sector.”

“A competitive wireless ecosystem is vital for our domestic and economic security. The research conducted from this competition will benefit everything from our cellphones to the secure radio networks needed for our national defense,” said Alan Davidson, Assistant Secretary of Commerce and head of the NTIA.

Participants are required to create 5G equipment prototypes and then test to see if their subsystems can connect to other contestant’s equipment. For specific application and registration information, see the NTIA website .

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