Better Broadband Better Lives

Author

Sarah Lai Stirland

Sarah Lai Stirland has 61 articles published.

Copyright

New York Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement

SAN FRANCISCO, March 22, 2011 -- A federal judge in New York City has rejected the expansive amended settlement agreement between Google, U.S. authors and publishers more than a year after the court heard from a wide variety of interested parties in hearings on the fairness of the settlement of a class action lawsuit. Keep Reading

Copyright

In U.S. Crackdown on “Pirate” Sites, It’s Sometimes Difficult To Determine Who’s a Pirate

Late into the night at the end of November, a text message woke up Waleed A. Gad El Kareem, an open-source web developer in Alexandria, Egypt. The 31-year-old developer had set up an alert to tell him whenever his site Torrent-Finder.com was inaccessible online. "I waited for it to come back, and it didn’t so I called [domain name provider] GoDaddy," he recalled in an interview. "They had no idea about it." Keep Reading

Cable From U.S. Embassy In Beijing Reveals U.S. Perspective on Trade Relationship

For all of the tough talk coming out of Congress as the United States and China embark on a high profile trade summit today, a confidential memo sent by U.S. Ambassador Jon M. Huntsman at the beginning of 2010 illustrates how the fortunes of the two countries have changed in modern times, and how the leadership of the United States is scrambling for innovative ways to readjust as its economic clout fades. Keep Reading

Copyright/Intellectual Property

Internet’s Founding Architects: Latest U.S. Senate Effort To Block Online Pirates Will Instigate Internet Chaos

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18th, 2010 -- The U.S. Senate's latest battle plan against intellectual property piracy online could gain traction and be approved by the body's Judiciary Committee Thursday, but a large group of the internet's founding architects are warning that the plan's technical approach would wreak havoc and destabilize the global network. Keep Reading

Media/Media ownership

Cablevision Accuses Fox of “Bad Faith” In Retrans Fight

San Francisco, October 25th, 2010 -- Cablevision Systems on Monday accused Fox Television parent News Corp of violating federal regulations that govern the terms of negotiations underlying business agreements between video distributors and broadcasters. The move sets the stage for a potential intervention by the Federal Communications Commission, or failing that, legislative action in Congress. Keep Reading

FCC/Media

Sen. Kerry Prods FCC Chief in Fee Impasse Between Cablevision and Fox

SAN FRANCISCO, October 19th, 2010 -- Senator John Kerry (D-Mass) on Tuesday prodded Federal Communications Chairman Julius Genachowski to take action in the business dispute between Fox Television and Cablevision when he sent over draft legislation that would change the way cable companies and broadcasters arrive at carriage agreements. Keep Reading

Will Copyright Law Save New York Area Baseball Fans?

As the landmark dispute over retransmission consent fees between Fox and Cablevision threatens to drag on through Tuesday, New York area baseball fans who are also Cablevision subscribers are scrambling to make alternative plans to view or hear the game. One ostensibly legal option they have is to view the Tuesday game between the San Francisco Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies on a new internet television service that retransmits broadcasters' signals over the internet. Keep Reading

Copyright

Will the US and China Share A Similar Model When Attacking IP Pirates Online?

San Francisco, September 29, 2010 -- A legislative proposal to allow the US' top cop to seize the web addresses of sites that authorities deem are dedicated to pirating intellectual property bears a remarkable resemblance to a crackdown currently underway in China against online pirates. A bipartisan group of 10 U.S. senators last week introduced legislation that would enable the U.S. Justice Department to render inaccessible Web sites judged to be dedicated to intellectual property infringement. Keep Reading

Copyright

ASCAP Music Licensing Fees Voided for Yahoo, RealNetworks

SAN FRANCISCO, September 28, 2010 —  A U.S. rate-setting court’s formula for establishing the fees that Yahoo! and RealNetworks must pay the nation’s dominant music licensing group is fundamentally flawed because it uses inconsistent data sets and because the benchmarks it uses aren’t relevant or comparable, said a U.S. appeals court Tuesday. “The district court… Keep Reading

Copyright

Justice Dept Could Shutter Infringing Web Sites With Court Orders Against Domain Name Registrars

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 21, 2010 -- A bipartisan group of 10 US senators on Monday introduced legislation that would enable the US Justice Department to render inaccessible Web sites judged to be dedicated to intellectual property infringement. The legislation would enable Justice to seek a preliminary injunction against domain name registrars, which would have to suspend access to the domains hosting infringing material, or that are trafficking in infringing material. The legislation would require the US attorney general to notify the federal intellectual property enforcement co-coordinator of the injunctions, and the coordinator would in turn be required to post the names of the suspended sites on a public web site. Keep Reading

Copyright

U.S. Copyright Chief Marybeth Peters, Who Presided Over Office’s Expansive Influence, to Retire

SAN FRANCISCO, September 13, 2010 — The U.S. top policy chief in charge of steering and influencing the nation's positions on copyright issues is to retire by the end of the year, the copyright office announced Monday. Marybeth Peters became Register in 1994, which the copyright office said is the second-longest term served by anyone other than the first Register ever Thorvald Solberg. Keep Reading

Copyright

Pioneers To Gather To Chart The Future of Music

SAN FRANCISCO, September 13, 2010 - Back in 2000, Public Enemy's Chuck D proclaimed on Charlie Rose that file-sharing heralded a new era in the music business. "The power is going back to the people," he said. Chuck D was debating Metallica's drummer Lars Ullrich, whose band had filed a lawsuit against Napster. Ullrich told Rose that his main concern was one of control. Fans can't just loot music online, he argued, and besides, file-sharing is wrong because it enriches everyone involved except for the artists themselves. Metallica ultimately settled. But a decade later, Chuck D and Public Enemy are still struggling to build a viable business model out of the "power to the people" motto. Keep Reading

Copyright/Uncategorized

Court Ruling Recasts Notion of Ownership of Books, Movies, Music, Software in Digital Age

SAN FRANCISCO, September 10, 2010 -- A federal appeals court ruling on Friday could eventually end the huge secondary market that has bloomed online in used books, software, and other forms of media both physical and digital when it said a software company can use its licenses to control the re-sale of their products. The panel of three judges for the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously decided that Autodesk's software license trumped the "first sale" doctrine encapsulated in federal law. This appears to give companies more leeway to license more of their products rather than simply selling them and giving up control. Keep Reading

Internet Service Providers Must Be Forced to Help Music Industry, Says U2’s Band Manager

SAN FRANCISCO, September 7, 2010 - U2's band manager Paul McGuinness has once again lit up the debate over who and what's responsible for the decline of the music industry. In the August edition of British GQ, McGuinness declares: "I am convinced that ISPs are not going to help the music and film industry voluntarily. Some things have got to come with the force of legislation." Keep Reading

Wrapped In A French E-mail Copyright Infringement Notice ‘Scam’ May Be Another Scam Itself

SAN FRANCISCO, September 3, 2010 -- A widely-circulated report about fake online copyright infringement e-mail notifications from French authorities demanding the payment of fines looks as if it is actually part of an underground misinformation campaign designed to sow confusion, says a US security researcher who looked into the issue for Broadbandbreakfast.com. The "news" about the French phishing scam appears to have originated from an audience member's question in a recent web chat at French financial newspaper site La Tribune with Eric Walter, the general secretary of the French online copyright enforcement agency HADOPI. Keep Reading

Report: US Blocked EU Online Publication of Latest Anti-Counterfeiting Draft Agreement

SAN FRANCISCO, September 2, 2010 - U.S. trade negotiators participating in talks with their European, Japanese and other other global counterparts blocked the online publication of the latest draft of a controversial anti-counterfeiting and piracy agreement after the latest round of meetings this August, according to a report from a European Union policy foundation. Keep Reading

Copyright

US Chamber Gets New Online Piracy and Anti-Counterfeiting Chief

By all accounts, online piracy of software, movies, and music is on the upswing and becoming ever more sophisticated, but that doesn’t daunt Steven Tepp. Tepp has just joined the US Chamber of Commerce in Washington DC as its first senior director for internet piracy and counterfeiting. His job will be to lead the Chamber’s efforts to battle the phenomena on behalf of its members. Keep Reading

ACTA Negotiators Won’t Release New Discussion Draft

SAN FRANCISCO, July 2, 2010 -- US trade representatives say they made progress this week in building consensus on key provisions of a new international intellectual property enforcement agreement -- but not enough to share with the rest of the world. “There was no consensus to release another text," said Nefeterius Akeli McPherson, a USTR spokeswoman in an e-mailed note about this week's discussions over the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement in Lucerne, Switzerland. "There was not sufficient progress at this round to make release of new text meaningful. The issues under discussion are still well reflected in the text that is public now. We hope to make more progress at the next round.” Keep Reading

Intellectual Property Czar Promises Transparency Amidst Controversy Over ‘Secretive’ Trade Negotiations

SAN FRANCISCO, June, 23, 2010 - A White House official in charge of coordinating the US government's enforcement of intellectual property rights on Tuesday pledged openness in the face of mounting criticism that the Obama administration is engaging in a secretive negotiating process with some of its trading partners as they discuss ways to more strictly enforce those rights both online and at their borders. Keep Reading

Will This Signal Be Televised? ‘Retransmission Consent’ Unscrambled At Breakfast Panel Of Broadcasters, Cable Industry and Public Interest Reps

WASHINGTON, June 11, 2010 - If you missed Broadbandbreakfast.com's panel session on retransmission consent fees, here's your chance to catch up and re-examine the issues in a complex debate that's been controversial since the enactment of the regime in the 1992 Cable Act. Keep Reading

Go to Top