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Anne Neville

Community Broadband Center Leaders to Gather in Silicon Valley for AnchorNETS and NTIA Event on November 16-17

in Broadband's Impact/Gigabit Networks/National Broadband Plan/NTIA/Smart Cities by

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, November 10, 2015 – Local broadband institutions seeking to leverage high-speed connectivity for the benefit of their broader communities will benefit from attending the inaugural AnchorNETS conference here on November 16 and 17.

Former Illinois Governor Pat Quinn

Former Illinois Governor Pat Quinn

Sponsored by the Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition, the AnchorNETS conference is being hosted in conjunction with the federal government’s BroadbandUSA initiative on Tuesday, November 17.

The AnchorNETS event will be keynoted by former Gov. Pat Quinn, the Illinois Democrat responsible for completion of a nearly $100 million, four-year project to install 1,000 miles of fiber-optic infrastructure throughout Illinois.

“Governor Quinn’s role in bringing together state, federal and local resources, from private and public sectors, in the pursuit of improved digital literacy and internet connectivity to Illinois anchor institutions is a model for all public officials,” said John Windhausen, executive director of SHLB Coalition.

Other highlighted speakers include Evan Marwell, CEO of the Education Superhighway, and Susan Walters, senior vice president of the California Emerging Technology Fund, and Catherine Sandoval, California Public Utility Commissioner.

Evan Marwell, CEO, EducationSuperhighway

Evan Marwell, CEO, EducationSuperhighway

The AnchorNETS conference is designed to introduce leaders from community anchor institutions to partners, solution providers and capital resources that will help provide a strategic road map to bringing Gigabit connectivity to more and more communities.

The following day, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration hosts a regional broadband summit titled the “California Broadband Workshop.” The aim of this program is to share best practices and lesson learned from network buildouts and innovative digital inclusion programs.

Speakers include Anne Neville, director of the California Research Bureau at the California State Library (and formerly director of the NTIA’s State Broadband Initiative program), plus Doug Kinkoph, assistant administrator of the NTIA, and others and the agency.

Additional speakers include San Francisco Chief Information Officer Miguel Gamino, Michael Ort from the California Broadband Cooperative, and Jory Wolf, Chief Information Officer from the City of Santa Monica.

Both events are being hosted at the Computer History Museum at 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View, California.

For the AnchorNets conference, here is the agenda and registration.

For the BroadbandUSA conference, here is the agenda and registration.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect the correct list of speakers at the NTIA event.

Drew Clark is the Chairman of the Broadband Breakfast Club. He tracks the development of Gigabit Networks, broadband usage, the universal service fund and wireless policy @BroadbandCensus. He is also Of Counsel with the firm of Best Best & Krieger LLP, with offices in California and Washington, DC. He works with cities, special districts and private companies on planning, financing and coordinating efforts of the many partners necessary to construct broadband infrastructure and deploy “Smart City” applications. You can find him on LinkedIN and Twitter. The articles and posts on BroadbandBreakfast.com and affiliated social media are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Rural Telecommunications Congress Videos and Presentations Posted

in Broadband's Impact/States/Universal Service by

AUSTIN, May 18, 2015 – The Rural Telecommunications Congress posted the entire video and presentations made at the recent Rural Telecommunications Congress held here last month at the Broadband Communities Summit.

The original link to the sessions is at http://www.ruraltelecon.org/2015-rtc-bbc-summit.html

2015 RTC Program Agenda and Session Content


Tuesday, April 14
3:00pm – 4:00pm: Looking Forward by Looking Back: Digital Inclusion from 1980 to Today
From the first community technology center (1980), the first community network (1986), to the first open gov/data initiative (1989), this presentation explores the history, themes, and future of our work.
Moderator:
  Jane Patterson – RTC President; President, The View Forward
        Speaker:  Anne Neville – Director, NTIA State Broadband Initiative, U.S. Department of Commerce
00:00
00:00
Digital Nation NTIA-SBI Highlights – session audio

Anne Neville Presentation

Download File



4:10pm – 5:00pm:  Broadband Is Like Oxygen to Rural America – What Technology and Companies Will Provide It?
Will Gigabit networks or wireless services best meet the needs of the nation’s rural communities? What options are rural communities missing without good-quality broadband? And when commercial providers are in short supply, how do non-profits, cooperatives and municipal broadband providers help fill the void? Hear the perspectives of a range of rural Internet providers.
        Moderator: Drew Clark – RTC Board Member; BroadbandBreakfast.com; Of Counsel, Kirton McConkie
        Speakers:
Luis Reyes – CEO/GM, Kit Carson Electric
        Will Aycock – CEO, Greenlight, Wilson, North Carolina
        Ron Walters – CEO, PANGAEA, Tryon, North Carolina
        Bill Shilito – President, North Carolina Wireless, LLC
00:00
00:00
Broadband is Like Oxygen to Rural America – session audio

Luis Reyes Presentation

Download File


Will Aycock Presentation

Download File


Ron Walters Presentation

Download File


Bill Shilito Presentation

Download File



Wednesday, April 15
9:00am – 9:50am: Lessons From Successful Broadband Deployments
Join this session to learn and discuss the state of rural broadband access. Hear actionable details about the innovative projects that are providing solutions in rural areas to create positive economic and community outcomes from broadband deployment.
Moderator: Jason Whittet – RTC Board Member; Program Officer, IDC Research
        Speakers:
        Tony Wilhelm – Vice President, Affiniti
        Mark Dzwonczyk – CEO, Nicholville Telephone
        David Salway – Executive Director, NY State Broadband Program
        Luis Reyes – CEO/GM, Kit Carson Electric
00:00
00:00
Lessons from Successful Rural Broadband Deployments – session audio

10:00am – 10:50am: Broadband and the Farm
Broadband technology is an essential tool to those who are linked to the land – modern farmers and ranchers, landowners, builders, and loggers that feed and supply the nation. Their efforts and success drive a significant component of the USA and world economy. The panel will provide a commercial perspective of how broadband is needed on the farm, a state perspective on its importance to the state economy, and discussion on how fiber and wireless networks are essential infrastructure to rural America.
        Moderator: Keith Montgomery – RTC Vice President; CFO Declaration Networks Group, Inc.
        Speakers:
        Mark Lewellen – Manager, Spectrum Advocacy, John Deere & Company
Phillip K. Brown – Director, State/Federal Policy and Broadband Planning, Connected Nation
        Dan Hunter – Assistant Commissioner for Water and Rural Affairs, Texas Department of Agriculture
00:00
00:00
Broadband and the Farm – session audio

Broadband And The Farm Presentation

Download File



2:30pm – 3:20pm: The Internet of Things – Its Impact on Rural Communities
Your refrigerator can order groceries when you need them, your house can call the plumber when there’s a leak, share a diabetic’s blood sugar values with his doctor, and  turn on the irrigation system when the soil is too dry or wait if rain is forecast. Along with medical devices and the fitness industry, these are examples of the Internet of Things that will add to our lives and integrate measurement, analysis, and even social media. Ubiquitous broadband with low latency is critical to make it happen.
Moderator:
Jane Patterson – RTC President; President, The View Forward
        Speaker: 
Mark Johnson
– CTO and VP of Data Architecture, MCNC
        John Chowdhury – Director of Utility Practice, Fujitsu Network Communications, Inc.
00:00
00:00
The Internet of Things Impact on Rural Communities – session audio

Mark Johnson Presentation

Download File


John Chowdhury

Download File



3:30pm – 4:20pm: Monitoring Rural America’s Health
Learn from projects that have outstanding outcomes in rural and statewide telehealth networks. There will be time to ask questions and have an interactive discussion about telehealth topics important to you. Hear about how current laws and regulations have impacts at state levels with privacy and security.
        Moderator: Galen Updike – RTC Past President; Mesa, Arizona
        Speakers:
        David Kirby – Project Director, NC TeleHealth Network
        Michael Keeling – Partner, Keeling Law Offices PC & Lobbyist for ATIC / Arizona TeleHealth
00:00
00:00
Monitoring Rural America’s Health – session audio

Galen Updike Presentation

Download File


Dave Kirby Presentation

Download File


Michael Keeling Presentation

Download File



5:10pm – 6:10pm: Digital Education and its Impact at the Community Level
Relating adequate broadband to assure quality of life, diverse Community Anchor Institutions (libraries, schools, colleges, economic agencies, public safety, and health organizations) are challenged with finding the most effective practices for training to outcomes. Solutions are evolving across multiple platforms for innovation from mobile devices to Gigacities, across sectors from health to digital entrepreneurship, and across diverse demographics, particularly the 1:2 Americans who are low income and living in poverty.
Moderator: Frank Odasz – RTC Secretary; President, Lone Eagle Consulting
    Speakers:
    John Windhausen – Executive Director, Schools, Health and Libraries Broadband Coalition (SHLB)
    Myra Best – Executive Director, DigiLEARN
Gene Crick – Executive Director, Metropolitan Austin Interactive Network (MAIN)
00:00
00:00
Digital Education and its Impact at the Community Level – session audio

Frank Odasz Presentation

Download File


Myra Best Presentation

Download File


Gene Crick Presentation

Download File



Thursday, April 16
9:40am – 10:30am: Plows to Tractors to Computers to Prosperity
The ability to drive the economy and enable business from anywhere can happen no matter where you live. The digital divide is not only about access, but more about having the resources and awareness to effectively utilize broadband and its ever-changing solutions to business. The session will highlight current research with examples across the nation to get a look into how rural homes and businesses are utilizing broadband, and offer solutions to drive economic improvements where you live.
Moderator: Eric Ogle – RTC Treasurer, Baker Center for Public Policy, University of Tennessee
Speakers:

        Michael Curri – President, Strategic Networks Group, Inc.
Monica Lynn Babine – Senior Associate, Program for Digital Initiatives, Washington State University
Maria Alvarez-Stroud
– Director, Broadband and eCommerce Education Center, University of Wisconsin
00:00
00:00
Plows to Tractors to Computers to Prosperity – session audio

Maria Alvarez-Stroud Presentation

Download File


Monica Babine Presentation

Download File



10:40am – 11:30am: Who Will Gigafy Our Rural Infrastructure?
This session will focus on how cross-sector partnerships provides broadband to rural communities. This will be an opportunity to interact with a rural electric cooperative moving towards providing their customers broadband (North Carolina), and with Sunset Digital Communications, the oldest rural Fiber-to-the-Premises company in the USA , partnerships with Powell Electric (Tennessee and Virginia) and a major health initiative (the Northeast Texas Medical and Educational Fiber Optic Network).
Moderator:
Joel Mulder – RTC Board Member; Senior Director of Business Development, G4S Technology
        Speakers:
        Marshall Cherry – COO, Roanoke Electric Cooperative
        Mickey Slimp – Executive Director, Northeast Texas Consortium of Colleges and Universities, UT Health Northeast
        Paul Elswick – Owner, President & CEO, Sunset Digital Communications, Inc.
00:00
00:00
Who Will Gigafy Our Rural Infrastructure? – session audio

Marshall Cherry Presentaion

Download File


Mickey Slimp Presentation

Download File


Paul Elswick Presentation

Download File


Better Broadband for Rural America Means Looking Beyond Tradition: Join Us at the Rural Telecommunications Congress Today

in Education/Expert Opinion/Health/Public Safety/Universal Service by

AUSTIN, April 14, 2015 – The Rural Telecommunications Congress portion of the Broadband Communities Summit opens here Tuesday with a series of conference sessions focused on looking beyond conventional rural telecom.

Rural Telecommunications CongressWith a theme of “Connecting Communities Across the Countryside of Rural America,” our conference sessions on Tuesday include a discussion of the State Broadband Initiative and its impact on rural America, and a robust panel on the companies and technologies that will broadband the life-giving broadband to rural America.

The RTC sessions planning for Wednesday including a summary of the lessons learned from successful broadband deployments, “Broadband and the Farm,” and the impact of the internet of things on rural communities — plus important insight on telemedicine-based health and education programs.

Thursday, the final day of the summit and RTC sessions, includes two unique sessions on “Powers to Tractors to Computers to Prosperity,” and on “Who Will Gigafy Our Rural Infrastructure?”

As a member of the RTC Board, which puts on this portion of the conference, I’ve never been more excited about the conference than the one planned to begin today.

Jane Patterson, President of the RTC, wrote of conference this year:

This year, rather than our own separate day, the RTC program of panels, seminars and plenary events will be interspersed throughout the three day conference. More than ever before the presentations, discussions and face to face encounters with  the best and brightest technologists, policy advocates, and  policy makers from all levels of government, will arm you with today’s best practices in building capacity and adoption.

You’ll return to your own constituency, clients, customers or citizen groups, with increased ability to advocate for better broadband, the economic impact it brings, or increased capacity to advocate for your products and counsel.

RTC has a rich tradition of bringing constituencies together to advocate for better broadband in rural areas. One conference, in Springfield, Illinois, in 2007, was instrumental in laying the groundwork for the Partnership for a Connected Illinois, an organization that I had the privilege of leading.

As with other State Broadband Initiative entities, Broadband Illinois had the task of working to sure that Illinoisans had access to, and the opportunity to connect to high-quality internet services. Working to ensure rural broadband has remained one of the trickiest parts of this mission for universal broadband.

Since I become a member of the RTC Board four years ago, I’ve been struck by our charge to ensure that rural broadband is not captive to traditional rural telecom interests. That’s why I was so pleased to hear Monday’s remarks by the Federal Communications Commission’s Jonathan Chambers about the Rural Broadband Experiment.

Among the lessons learned from this bid, offered last year by the FCC, were that broadband support could be offered more than twice as cheaply as it currently is being offered!

As an organization advocating for rural broadband that not beholden to traditional telecom interests, the Rural Telecommunications Congress takes its strength from the diversity of interest: State-wide entities, businesses who see opportunities for rural America, and long-time rural residents who simply want something better than dial-up or digital subscriber lines (DSL).

The RTC’s full program this year is listed below, and available here on the Broadband Communities web site. We invite you to join us this year!

 

Tuesday, April 14

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
US—Digital Nation
Accomplishments of the State Broadband Initiative that can drive Rural America to move forward with Gigabit/High Speed Broadband.

Moderator:
Jane Patterson, President, The View Forward – Go Forward

Speaker:
Anne Neville – Director, State Broadband Initiative, NTIA; U.S. Department of Commerce

 

4:10 pm – 5:00 pm
Broadband Is Like Oxygen to Rural America – What Technology and Companies Will Provide It?
This session will examine the broadband needs of rural America. Will Gigabit Networks or wireless services best meet the needs of the nation’s rural communities? What options are rural communities missing without good-quality broadband? And when commercial providers are in short supply, how will non-profits, cooperatives and municipal broadband providers help fill the void? Hear the perspectives of a range of rural Internet providers.

Moderator:
Drew Clark - Chairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com; Of Counsel, Kirton McConkie

Speaker:
Luis Reyes – Chief Executive Officer & General Manager, Kit Carson Electric
Will Aycock – CEO, Greenlight, the Gigabit Network in Wilson, North Carolina, that petitioned the Federal Communications Commission for the removal of state broadband restrictions
Ron Walters - CEO of PANGAEA of Tryon, North Carolina, the first broadband fiber nonprofit award-winning network honored by Broadband Communities Magazine a decade ago.
Bill Shilito – President, North Carolina Wireless, LLC

 


Wednesday, April 15

9:00 am – 9:50 am
Lessons From Successful Broadband Deployments
Join this session to learn and discuss the state of rural broadband. Hear actionable details about the innovative projects that are providing solutions in rural areas to create positive economic and community outcomes from broadband deployment.

Moderator:
Jason Whittet – Program Officer, IDC Research

Speakers:
Tony Wilhelm – Vice President, Affiniti
Mark Dzwonczyk – CEO, Nicholville Telephone
David Salway – Executive Director, NY State Broadband Program
Luis Reyes – Chief Executive Officer & General Manager, Kit Carson Electric
Walter Haase – General Manager, Navajo Tribal Utility Authority

 

10:00 am – 10:50 am
Broadband and the Farm
Broadband technology is an essential tool to those who are linked to the land – modern farmers and ranchers, landowners, builders, and loggers that feed and supply the nation. Their efforts and success drive a significant component of the USA and world economy. The panel will provide a commercial perspective of how broadband is needed on the farm, a state perspective on its importance to the farming and state economy, and discussion on how fiber and wireless networks are essential infrastructure to rural America.

Moderator:
Keith Montgomery – VP Rural Telecom Congress and CFO Declaration Networks Group Inc.

Speakers:
Mark Lewellen – Manager Spectrum Advocacy, John Deere & Company,
Dan Hunter – Assistant Commissioner for Water and Rural Affairs, Texas Dept. of Agriculture
Phillip K. Brown – Director of State/Federal Policy & Broadband Planning, Connected Nation

 

2:30 pm – 3:20 pm
The Internet of Things – Its Impact on Rural Communities
How Gigabit broadband will be used in rural settings. Your refrigerator can order groceries when you need them, your house can call the plumber when there’s a leak, share a diabetic’s blood sugar values with his doctor, turn on the irrigation system when the soil is too dry or wait if rain is forecast. Slow progress with medical devices illustrate some challenges. But the fitness industry is showing the way by exploiting ideas to integrate measurement, analysis and social media. Ubiquitous broadband with low latency and high capacity is critical to make it happen.

Moderator:
Jane Patterson – President, The View Forward – Go Forward

Speaker:
Mark Johnson – Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Data Architecture, MCNC
John Chowdhury – Utility Practice Director, Fujitsu Network Communications

 

3:30 pm – 4:20 pm
Monitoring Rural America’s Health
Learn from the projects that have outstanding outcomes in rural and statewide telehealth networks. There will be plenty of time to ask questions and have real interactive discussions. Hear about how laws and regulations have impacts at state levels and privacy and security.

Moderator:
Galen Updike – Rural Telecom Congress (RTC)

Speaker:
David Kirby – Project Director, NC TeleHealth Network
Michael Keeling - Partner, Keeling Law Offices PC & Lobbyist for ATIC / Arizona TeleHealth

 

5:10 pm – 6:10 pm
Education and Its Impact at the Community Level
Related to “adequate broadband to assure quality of life,” diverse Community Anchor Institutions; libraries, schools, community colleges, eco-dev agencies, public safety, and health organizations, are all challenged with finding the most effective “best practices for training to outcomes.” New solutions are evolving across multiple platforms for innovation, from mobile devices to Gigacities, and across sectors, from health to digital entrepreneurship, and across America’s diverse demographics, particularly the 1:2 Americans who are low income and/or in poverty.

Moderator:
Frank Odasz – President, Lone Eagle Consulting

Speaker:
John Windhausen – Executive Director, Broadband (SHLB) Coalition
Myra Best – Executive Director, DigiLEARN

 

 


Thursday, April 16

9:40 am – 10:30 am
Plows to Tractors to Computers to Prosperity
The digital divide is not only about affordability, but also having the resources and knowledge available to effectively utilize broadband and its solutions. The ability to conduct business from anywhere depends on driving an understanding how to make the digital economy come true no matter where you live.

Michael Curri will delve into SNG’s research across the nation, including numerous rural areas to not only look into how rural homes and businesses are falling behind in broadband utilization, but will present possible solutions to help drive improvements.

Moderator:
Eric Ogle – RTC Treasurer, The Howard Baker Center for Public Policy

Speakers:
Larry Gates – Utilities Director, City of Chanute, Kansas
Michael Curri – Founder and President, Strategic Networks Group, Inc.
Maria Alvarez Stroud – Director, Broadband & E-Commerce Education Center, University of Wisconsin – Extension

 

10:40 am – 11:30 am
Who Will Gigafy Our Rural Infrastructure?
This session will focus on how a cross-sector partnership, as well as nonprofit and for profits cooperate to provide broadband now and the future ideas to take home in your toolkit with an added example of an exciting application in Texas. This will be an unusual opportunity to interact with a rural electric cooperative moving towards providing their customers broadband (North Carolina) and with Sunset Digital Communications, the oldest rural Fiber-to-the-Premises company in the USA still in operation, and its partnership with Powell Electric ( Tennessee and Virginia) and a major health initiative ( UT Health Northeast, the consortium was People’s Telephone’s BTOP educational and medical partner in creating the Northeast Texas Medical and Educational Fiber Optic Network. Texas)

Moderator:
Joel Mulder – Senior Director of Business Development, G4S Technology LLC

Speakers:
Marshall Cherry – Chief Operating Officer, Roanoke Electric Cooperative
Mickey Slimp – Executive Director, Northeast Texas Consortium of Colleges and Universities, UT Health Northeast
Paul Elswick – Owner/President & CEO, Sunset Digital Communications, Inc.

Rural Telecommunications Congress Members Release Report on 50 State Broadband Initiative Entities

in Broadband's Impact by

AUSTIN, Texas, April 10, 2014 – Members of the Rural Telecommunications Congress on Thursday released a comprehensive report on the state of the 50 State Broadband Initiative entities.

The report was compiled by Galen Updike, immediate past president of the RTC, with the assistance of state broadband leaders. It assembles data about the programs of the governmental and non-profit entities that have been engaged in broadband mapping and planning over the past five years.

Among the questions that the report seeks to address, for each of the 50 states, are the following:

  1. [Is there an] ongoing State BB Leadership Org or Council to Coordinate with Rural BB Champions and Providers ?
  2. Is the State BB Map Identifying deficit areas per identified  standards available for use by the public and Policy makers?
  3. Are State and Regional BB Plans created and  being widely used?
  4. Is there a Separate State BB PPO for Financing, Bonding & Grants in Deficit areas?
  5. Are there State Funding Programs for Matching [dollars] and for Financing grants/loans to Political subs & Providers?
  6. Is Formal Coordination  taking place with State  PUC to reduce Regulatory barriers for providers?
  7. Is there adequate Collaboration W/ Rural political sub-divisions on ROW issues and for Aggregation of Demand for Providers?
  8. Is there Formal  State Collaboration with Health & Education Institutions  (USF LEA’s) to optimize FCC subsidies?
  9. Are there Sustainable Infrastructure Programs directed at Unserved and Underserved through a State USF fee?
  10. Is there frequent Legislative Collaboration for BB Policy Initiatives and Program Leadership Funding?

The report is a prelude to the discussion on “The Bandwidth of the States,” which will be kicked off in a keynote address by Anne Neville, the program director of SBI of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration. The formal program for Thursday’s event is available online:

The report about broadband in the states by Galen Updike, broken into more than a dozen data-sets and spreadsheets, is available at the following links:

10-Cover page to Attributes Workbook

20-States BB Data Table – Attibutes of Successful State Broadband Programs

30-Links to State NTIA SBI programs

31-SBDD Grant Recipients by State

40-All BTOP Infrastructure Grants per list of States

50-Individual BTOP Infrastructure Grants by State – Linked to NTIA website

51-BTOP Infrastruct Tot dollars by State Population – ranked

60-By State – SBI Governance abstract – Linked

61-State Statutes Impact BB by State- 2011

62-State Statutes Impact BB by State-2013

63-Governor 2014 St of St Speech – by State – BB as topic

70-States with Municipal BB Pre-emption laws – linked to Citation

71-US Map of States Indicating States with Muni Contraints

81-AKAMAI State by State Connect speeds and Ranking 2013

82-AKAMAI State by State IP Count and Percent gt 10Mb Connections

83-AKAMAI State by State Speed test results – percent gt 4Mb

91-Maps of USDA BIP Middle and Last Mile Project locations and Tech types

92-Map – USDA BIP and BTOP infrastructure TOT Dollars by State

99-NTIA CAI Report to States-2011

Rural Telecommunications Congress Members and Others Take Spotlight at Broadband Communities Summit

in Broadband's Impact/Expert Opinion/Fiber/Gigabit Networks/NTIA/Rural Utilities Service by

AUSTIN, Texas, April 4, 2014 – Next week, at the Broadband Communities Summit here in Austin, the Rural Telecommunications Congress will take center stage with a series of sessions on “The Bandwidth of the States,” “Financing Future Bandwidth,” “Digital Learning in the Classroom,” “Rural Innovation,” and — as a kicker — “Cool Things Rural Communities Are Doing With Broadband.”

At this marque event next week, I’ve been asked to lead the Rural Telecommunications Congress morning session on “The Bandwidth of the States” together with Galen Updike, immediate past president of the RTC.

Those wishing to attend the entire Broadband Communities event may do so by registering as members of the Rural Telecommunications Congress. RTC members are able to attend the event at the rate of $200, for an $895 value.

To participate, register at https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1260970 and use the registration code “RTC200″ (no quotation marks).

As members of the RTC Board, Galen and I have planned a series of morning events that will highlight progress in broadband over the past five years.

We are coming up on the fifth year anniversary of the State Broadband Initiative program. SBI, part of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s State Broadband Initiative program, has played a substantial role in enhancing broadband’s contribution to economic development. Anne Neville, the program director of SBI, has agreed to give our morning keynote on the subject.

After that, we’ll move directly into the “50 States in 50 Minutes” section, in which eight spokespeople from eight regions of the country will speak about the state of broadband in the states. This will be an opportunity for rapid-fire information about each of the states.

Several of the questions that will be address in this presentation include:
•    What is the state of broadband now versus five years ago in the regions?
•    What notable infrastructure projects have occurred over the past five years in the regions?
•    What notable projects to spur broadband adoption have taken place in the regions?
•    What are the future opportunity to public-private broadband efforts in the states within the regions? Are there any impediments to such progress in the states?
•    What role will SBI entities have following December 31, 2014? Have any of the SBI entities made public their plans to continue, or to discontinue, operations?
•    What role will the public safety network FirstNet play within the regions?
•    Are there any notable private-sector Gigabit Networks under development in the regions?

Below is the formal program, also available online:

9:40 am – 11:00 am
The Bandwidth of the States: Where They Stand in 2014

Keynote Presentation:

Anne Neville – Director, State Broadband Initiative of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information

The past five years have witnesses an explosion of broadband internet services, by providers and by the public sector. Stimulus projects including infrastructure investments, sustainable broadband programs, and state broadband initiatives have boosted awareness of the benefits of internet connectivity. Anne Neville, Director of the key federal broadband program working in collaboration with the states,will set the stage for our “50 States in 50 Minutes” presentation. She will be followed by spokesmen from eight regions to highlight the state of bandwidth in each of the 50 states.

50 States In 50 Minutes:

Where the states stand at the ending of BTOP and NTIA-SBDD. Metrics of past deployment of broadband. How the states are now poised for the future. All 50 states will be reviewed and commented on. A report will be available.

Speakers by Region:

Southwest:
Galen Updike – Former Chair, Rural Telecom Congress

New England:
Jason Whittet – Former Dep. Dir., Mass Broadband Institute

Mid-Atlantic:
David Salway – Director, New York State Broadband Program Office

Piedmont South:
Jane Smith Patterson – Chair, RTC.

Deep South:
David Moore – Director, Louisiana Broadband Initiative

Midwest:
Mike Wilson – CostQuest Associates

Great Plains:
Eric Mills – General Counsel, Connected Nation

Northwest:
Frank Odasz – President, Lone Eagle Consulting

11:10 am – 12:30 pm
Envisioning a Future for Broadband Deployment

Building on “50 States in 50 Minutes,” this session will look to the future for national broadband policy leadership. Informed by the State Broadband Initiative programs, as well as both a range of local, regional and national activities, this session will bring considerable depth and expertise to the next steps for broadband deployment. We’ll survey national developments, for-profit and non-profit Gigabit Network, legislative barriers to public broadband, and ongoing opportunities for public-private partnerships.

Moderator:
Drew Clark – Chairman and Publisher, Broadband Breakfast Club; Former Executive Director, Broadband Illinois

Speakers:
Rachelle Chong – Techwire.net; former California PUC
Lev Gonick – CEO of One Community, Cleveland
Christopher Mitchell – Institute for Local Self Reliance
Anne Neville – Director, State Broadband Initiative, NTIA, U.S. Dept of Commerce
David Shaw – Partner, Kirton McConkie; General Counsel, UTOPIA

 

Connect Nevada Broadband Summit on Nov. 18 to Explore Broadband in Education

in Broadband Data/Broadband Mapping/Education/FCC/NTIA by

November 15, 2013 – Nevada has only two metropolitan areas (Las Vegas and Reno), 80 percent of its land owned by the federal government, and no fiber-optic wires that connect the two cities, said the head of the state’s non-profit broadband initiative.

A deeply rural demography and highly remote geography present some tough obstacles for Connect Nevada, the broadband mapping and planning initiative under the federal government’s broadband initiative.

On Monday, November 18, the group is hosting its third annual broadband summit, with the theme of this year’s event centered around educational uses of technology, said Lindsey Niedzielski, program manager for Connect Nevada.

The summit is being organized around the role of social media in educational settings, the use of tablet and interactive devices in classrooms — often dubbed “1:1 education” for the ideal ration of devices to students — and the broadband capacity needs of higher education.

Headlining the event will be Blair Levin, chief architect of the Federal Communication Commission’s National Broadband Plan in 2010, who has spearheaded the Gig.U initiative.

The Gig.U initiative aims to promote high-speed broadband service the communities around universities. It has seen its first successes through the partnerships between the University of Chicago, and the University of Washington, and Gigabit Squared. Gigabit Squared’s project on the south side of Chicago was also spurred on by funding from Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn’s Gigabit Community Challenge.

Also featured at the Connect Nevada program will be Anne Neville, director of the State Broadband Initiative program of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration; and Dale Erquiaga, the Nevada state superintendent of public instruction.

Information and registration for the event, to be hosted at the University of Nevada in Reno, is available at http://www.connectnv.org/broadband-summit.

 

Neville Keynotes June Broadband Breakfast Club Mapping Discussion

in Broadband Mapping/Broadband Stimulus/Broadband TV/Broadband Updates/Broadband's Impact/National Broadband Plan/NTIA by

WASHINGTON, June 23, 2011 – National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) Program Director, Anne Neville, offered the keynote address Tuesday morning at the Broadband Breakfast Club’s June event, ” The National Broadband Map: Policy, Consumer and Economic Development Implications.”

Neville, who oversees the development of the National Broadband Map, kicked off the event with an overview of the program, including how the NTIA obtained data, how the data have been used, and the future of the mapping efforts.

The National Broadband Map: Policy, Consumer and Economic Development Implications from BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Among the highlights of the program, Neville pointed out the availability of the collected data to research institutions to use and share.

“We wanted to get information to stakeholders quickly and efficiently and we wanted to make the data usable and sharable,” said Neville.  “In only four months [since the map was released] we’re already having a huge use of the data and a lot of feedback about the data and how we can continue improving the data set.

Nicol Turner-Lee, Vice President and Director of the Media and Technology Institute at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, explained how her organization, which focuses on issues pertaining to African Americans and other people of color, used the data to help its research.  While the National Broadband Map was helpful to the think tank, she said, refinement of the data could push research even further.

“What we saw is that there’s still work to be done on ubiquitous mobile access, particularly in communities of color, where people are heavily dependent on mobile use,” said Turner-Lee.  “We would have liked to have seen [the mobile access data] variable cleaned up a little bit more to really make the argument for communities of color to get fair access and a chance to actually use it.”

William Johnson, Deputy Director, Office of CyberSecurity at the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES), praised the map for its ingenuity and the cooperation that brought it together.

“I’ve been doing mapping work for 26 years and I can tell you I have never seen an effort reap a seamless nationwide comprehensive coverage done to a common standard so quickly,” said Johnson. “It’s really breathtaking.”

David Don, Senior Director for Public Policy at Comcast Corporation, expressed that due to the NTIA’s efforts and the publication of the National Broadband Map, a more comprehensive story of broadband in the U.S. is now being told.  Moreover, he said, that story indicated success in the effort to provide a great majority with access to broadband.  While there need to be continuing efforts to “bridge the gap” to accomplish near-100 percent availability, however, the focus ought to shift to adoption.

“As Comcast has been saying for a couple of years now,” said Don, “in the U.S., our broadband issues are not about availability, but about adoption.”

Cary Hinton, Policy Advisor to the Chief of the DC Public Service Commission, noted that as the mapping effort has progressed from the initial data collection to post-publication collection, the Public Service Commission has noted more ready cooperation from Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to provide information requested in the first round of collection, as well as additional data to help District as well as national mapping refinements.

“One of the major differences we’ve found from our initial undertaking… to now,” said Hinton, “our standard practice is that we ask for a copy of Form 477 data as well as a questionnaire to please fill out.  What we found is that there has been an increase in companies providing us this data.”

FCC Form 477 includes data requested by federal agencies in connection with broadband mapping.

Adam Elliot, President and Founder of ID InSights, a company that provides data and analytics services.  For his company, he says, the data provided by the National Broadband Map is integral.

“For where we’re at, it’s all about going forward,” said Elliot.  “We’ve made phenomenal progress on the broadband map… What are the changes we’re making and how fast?  We can [evaluate] at six month increments and say ‘we’re this far and are we getting to our goal or not?’  If not, why not and how do we get there faster?”

TechNet Hosts First Broadband Map Research Meeting

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WASHINGTON, March 24, 2011 – The bipartisan technology policy group TechNet gathered government officials and leading broadband scholars Tuesday to present the first set of academic research using data from the national broadband map.

National Telecommunications and Information Administration Chief of Staff Thomas Powers kicked off the event by praising the researchers for their quick analysis of the large data set.

The national broadband map comprises 25 million pieces of data, and represents the most detailed set of broadband data compiled to date.

The research was only possible due to the granularity of data that the broadband map collected. The research is still in preliminary stages, but the findings support many claims that policy makers have been asserting about the link between broadband availability, demographics and economics.

Ying Li and Mikyung Baek from the Joint Center on Political and Economic Studies looked at the correlation between broadband availability, income and race in Los Angeles, Chicago and South Carolina. They found that the heavily African American areas of Los Angeles had a low level of broadband availability. In South Carolina, they found that in areas where the overall population has a low income race did not affect availability.

Sharon Strover, Director, Telecommunications and Information Policy Institute at the University of Texas examined the quality of broadband in rural regions. She compared speed availability in various rural areas and found that the economic characteristics of the region directly affect the broadband availability. In areas where mining and farming is dominant speeds tend to be low.

Strover also found a greater disparity in the difference between advertised speed and actual speed in rural areas than in urban.

“Right now we are drawing conclusions from Census data collected in 2000,” said Johannes Bauer Director of Special Programs, Quello Center for Telecommunication Management & Law at Michigan State University. “To really understand what’s going on we need access to the most recent Census data.”

Bauer went on to suggest that when the NTIA updates the map it include information about adoption and pricing.

“We now know what’s available but not what people are using.” Bauer said.

George Ford, Chief Economist at the Phoenix Center, provided a critique of the map saying that it was “incomplete” and that it did not provide accurate enough data to be used to conduct verifiable analysis.  Ford commended the NTIA map as a first attempt, but that researchers should wait for improvements before drawing any conclusions.

Communications Workers of America Telecommunications Policy Director Debbie Goldman said that while many providers did not initially supply data to the map, they now see how the public is using the map and are more willing to provide data.

Steven Morris, Vice president at National Cable & Telecommunications Association, echoed the statement, saying, “we have always encouraged our members to provide data for the mapping effort and are trying to convince the few hold outs to supply data.”

National Broadband Mapping Program Director, Anne Neville responded to the critics saying, “This is the largest and most detailed map ever made and there are going to be some errors, but this is Version One – with each update the map will improve.”

Neville also stressed the point that the data is coming directly from the Internet service providers and many of them do not have the data in the level of detail the map requires. When the data is converted, it can lead to errors, but states have been given funding to update and improve the data over the next five years.

The NTIA plans to update the map in late August.

New America Foundation, Google Present International Broadband Map

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WASHINGTON, March 23, 2011 – The New America Foundation and Google gathered government officials Wednesday to  present an overview of the organizations’ website that gathers, compiles and maps international broadband connection speed data.

The site, Measurement Lab, provides the broadband data for researchers. The site is a collaborative venture between Google, the New America Foundation and the academic consortium PlanetLab.

Users provide the site with data on the speed, latency and throughput of their Internet connections. Currently the site collects 1.3 million pieces of data daily. Since the site launched in 2009 it has collected over 300 terabytes of data – that amount of data would fill more than forty-three thousand dvds.

The map presents data from the national level down to cities, making it one of the most detailed and expansive data sets available.

National Broadband Mapping Program Director, Anne Neville, said that she hopes that someone will “mash up,” or combine, the data collected by Measurement Lab with the national broadband map.

“Our goal is just to collect the data and allow researchers to analyze it and find value,” said Vinton G. Cerf, Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist.

Sascha Meinrath, Director of New America’s Open Technology Initiative went on to say that the site presents data in an open format to allow researchers to conduct deep analysis.

Cerf acknowledged that the dataset is not complete, but the organization is continuously working with new partners to expand data collection and improve accuracy.

Michael Byrne, Geographic Information Officer at the Federal Communications Commission called the site “fantastic” saying, “this data will allow us to look beyond simple speeds and create great comparisons.”

Taylor Reynolds, Specialist Analyst at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), also praised the level of detail the map presents.

“At the OECD we are able to look at the overall picture which makes conducting deep analysis difficult,” Reynolds said. “This new highly detailed data set will let us see how broadband directly effects education, health care and other sectors.”

Broadband.com Unveils Broadband Map With Business Pricing Information; Residential Information To Follow

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By Jonathan Charnitski and Rahul Gaitonde

WASHINGTON March 23, 2011 – Broadband voice company, Bandwidth.com, unveiled Monday a nationwide map that displays availability and pricing data for business broadband connections, building on information from the National Telecommunications Information Administration’s national broadband map.

The map is available at Broadband.com.

The Broadband.com map provides information directed at businesses rather than consumers. Consequently, the map only offers data on high-speed networks, such as T1 and Gigabit Ethernet, though the company is currently working on collecting data on cable and 4G connections. In contrast, the NTIA broadband map provides data only on the broadband networks available in a specific area.

Fifteen major internet service providers (ISPs), the national broadband map and Ookla’s netindex.com – which compiles national and global connection data - provided the data from which Broadband.com built its map.

The map does not currently include data for residential connections, but Bandwidth.com Vice President of Internet Services, Joe Merrill, said Tuesday that the company plans to include residential information, including cable and 4G, sometime in the coming months.

Merrill also said that the company has signed an agreement with Sprint to add its high speed mobile network information to the map and anticipates working with Verizon and AT&T to obtain their network footprint information.

“We want to do for broadband what Expedia did for hotels and airline tickets,” Merrill said. “There should be a way to give consumers leverage with the carriers, otherwise they’re at the carriers’ mercy; we want to open up the black box of telecom.”

Researchers in the field have criticized the national broadband map for not including pricing data. Anne Neville, Director at the National Broadband Mapping Program has said that NTIA chose not to include pricing databecause prices change more frequently than the map will be updated.

Broadband.com obtains their pricing data directly from the ISPs and will update their map regularly as they obtain new pricing and speed data.  The NTIA however has said that the national map will only be updated twice annually.

The NTIA provides users with the ability to download all of the 25 million pieces of data that comprise the map to facilitate the creation of new applications such as the Broadband.com map. The NTIA also includes information about how to access and use the Application Programming Interface (API), which is the standard set of programming instructions used to interact with the data on the broadband map website.

Broadband.com is one of the first attempts to commercialize the data gathered by the NTIA.

 

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