Posts Tagged ‘Google Fiber’

Utah Foundation Report Highlights Pioneering Work for Advanced Broadband, Including UTOPIA Gigabit Network

Fiber, Gigabit Networks October 19th, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY, October 19, 2015 – Utah has been leading the nation in many areas of broadband internet access and its proliferation, according to a report released on Wednesday by the non-profit Utah Foundation.

“Utah’s history of investing early and its collaboration among many public and private entities has helped develop an infrastructure that can support the local business climate, including Utah’s expanding tech sector which is heavily reliant on high-capacity networks,” reads the report, by Shawn Teigen, Christopher Collard and Robert Jordan of the foundation.

“It is likely that future internet applications will require exceedingly high-speed internet, far beyond that which is available today. Preparing the infrastructure now may be prudent,” write the authors.



Spurning Google Fiber, Portland Suburb of Lake Oswego Pushes Toward Broadband Partnership

Fiber, Gigabit Networks, Smart Cities October 14th, 2015

LAKE OSWEGO, Oregon, October 14, 2015 – This suburb of Portland, a potential candidate for Google Fiber’s Gigabit-speed internet service, has said it isn’t willing to wait around for the search engine giant.

At a city council meeting here on Tuesday night, elected officials in this city of 37,000 listened, questioned and debated between two proposed public-private partnerships that would result in the construction of Gigabit-speed fiber-optic infrastructure.

City Council Meeting in Lake Oswego, Oregon

Instead of sitting and waiting for Google, the city council members appeared inclined to move forward on a public-private project with city involvement.

“There was a great buzz and excitement when Google announced” the possibility that it would come to Portland, said Councilmember Jon Gustafson during the session — but the city hasn’t wasn’t seen any action since that time.

Last year, Google announced possible expansion to Portland and five suburbs, including Lake Oswego. The company has made commitment, however.

“Google is still at the vapor stage,” added Chip Larouche, chief technology officer for the city. Speaking at the Tuesday meeting, he said that Google is “talking about how ‘we might make you a promise.’”

Instead, City Manager Scott Lazenby said that in June Lake Oswego put out a Request for Proposals to build their own Gigabit Network. The city received two responses from private companies, and one from the City’s own Public Works Department.


Broadband Communities Highlights Impact of Internet on Economic Development with Kentucky Conference

Gigabit Networks, Press Releases, Universal Service September 14th, 2015

Editor’s Note: This week marks the fourth annual Economic Development Conference hosted by Broadband Communities Magazine. The roving conferences have moved from Southern Virginia to Chicagoland; from Western Massachusetts to — this week — Lexington, Kentucky. will be there, reporting on and analyzing the most significant developments to emerge from the event. The event will also be Broadband Communities’ first event since the passing of CEO Scott DeGarmo last month.

Below is the Chairman’s Statement about the event. The agenda is available here; registration is available here

Across America, hundreds of communities are seeking to acquire or develop advanced communications networks. Such networks, they believe, can drive and support simultaneous progress in multiple fields that are of critical importance to them, including economic development and global competitiveness, education, health care, public safety, transportation, energy, environmental protection, democratic engagement, and much more. In virtually every case, fostering robust economic development has ranked at or near the top of the list of considerations motivating these communities.


How to Find New Light Bulbs for the Internet Age: Parallels Between Electricity and Fiber-optics

Broadband's Impact September 14th, 2015

Editor’s Note: Several months ago, Drew Clark’s column from the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, Utah, touched upon some of the important parallels between the most prominent infrastructure investment of the 20th Century – electricity – and the emerging essential fiber-optic infrastructure of the 21st Century. With increased discussion about the significant of the applications that run Gigabit Networks, including the upcoming Broadband Communities Conference in Lexington, Kentucky, it is reprinted here.

SALT LAKE CITY — It’s easy to plug a refrigerator, television, alarm clock or toothbrush into a wall socket. We forget the lesson that electricity became widely available only after a single application — the light bulb — caught the imagination and desire of the public.

Electricity is history. Today we face the next-generation infrastructure: gigabit networks. Global visionaries here in Utah see the need for these communication networks, even as they struggle to explain the “light bulb” that will make it plain why a super-fast Internet network is as necessary as running water and a universal electric grid.


One of these visionaries is Glenn Ricart, an unassuming man who moved his family here from the East Coast 20 years ago. The late Ray Noorda recruited him as chief technology officer at Novell. A renowned technologist, Ricart set up the first Internet exchange point at the University of Maryland in 1986. Two years ago, he was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame.

Ricart’s recent energies have been devoted to co-founding an ambitious venture known as US Ignite. Its goal is next-generation applications with “transformative public benefit.”

What are those? Of the 476 technologies submitted to US Ignite, none have yet emerged as the light bulb thatwill answer skeptics who believe a few megabits of connectivity should be enough to satisfy anyone’s need for Internet movies, music and email.

They include real-time emergency response systems, air pollution monitoring, collaborative virtual reality surgery and analyses of traffic congestion. US Ignite is particularly keen on applications that advanceeducation and workforce, energy, health care, public safety, transportation and advanced manufacturing.

In other words, said Ricart, “we exist to help cities become smarter, and help their citizens take advantage of gigabit networks.”


Former Architect of National Broadband Plan Says That Every City Needs a Broadband Plan

Broadband's Impact, FCC, Gigabit Networks, National Broadband Plan September 14th, 2015

September 14, 2015 – Every city should create a city-wide broadband plan of its own, said the former director of the National Broadband Plan, in wide-ranging speech touting four strategies useful for different types of city broadband plans.

Speaking on Friday at the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Officers annual conference in San Diego, Blair Levin of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and the group Gig-U, said that every city should tackle four key strategies: (1) Getting fiber deeper into neighborhoods; (2) Using community WiFi; (3) Getting everyone online; and (4) Promoting innovative civic applications for broadband.

Levin, the former architect of the Federal Communications Commission’s broadband plan, crafted from 2009 to 2010, said that the United States was about the 20th country to adopt such a plan for the deployment of high-speed internet. Nearly 150 countries have one now.

“With cities, we’re where we were with countries in 2010. Several dozen have them,” Levin said. “But now, such a plan is becoming table stakes for any city that wants its residents to be part of the 21st Century Information Economy.”

In his remarks, Levin addressed the pivotal role that Google Fiber has played in spurring the development of Gigabit Networks. Indeed, on Thursday, Google announced upcoming fiber-optic deployments in three new cities: Irvine, Calif., Louisville, Kentucky; and San Diego.

He categories the types of cities, and they relative trajectories towards Gigabit Networks, as follows:

“The first set of communities is those that either have or are likely to see Google Fiber enter. For these, the starting strategy is pretty simple. Accelerate to the extent possible, Google’s entry.” Whether or not Google comes, such cities will be well-situated for others, as well.

Blair Levin


In Gigabit City Provo, Utah, a Startup Ecosystem Thrives in Good Soil and Deepening Roots

Broadband's Impact September 11th, 2015

PROVO, Utah, September 11, 2015 – Utah is uniquely hospitable to entrepreneurship, and its deepening roots in software and search analytics have enabled it to become a significant technology hub, said Gov. Gary Herbert and a host of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and national journalists participating in the first annual Startfest here.

The startup festival last week featured more than 200 speakers and panels, including CEOs or top executives from Domo, Qualtrics, Pluralsight, Maritz CX, MX, Oracle, Vivint and a score of VCs.

“Utah, in a lot of ways, is a stronger and vibrant community than Austin, Texas; or Boulder, Colorado; and yet they get an insane amount of press,” said Clint Betts, the founder of the publication, which hosted the event.

Timed to coincide with Provo’s annual “Rooftop Concert Series,” showcasing local bands, and the smartphone-focused Pocket Film Fest, the event also concluded with a Google Fiber-sponsored “hackathon” devoted to helping develop applications for Gigabit fiber connectivity.

Cheerleader-in-Chief Gov. Gary Herbert

“I see Utah rising like cream to the top,” said Herbert, governor of the 33rd largest state since 2009, and who is running for re-election in 2016. He kicked off the panel programs on Tuesday, September 1, with a speech followed by a question and answer session with Betts.

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“That doesn’t mean we don’t have challenges, but we are on the right road and going in the right direction,” said Herbert.

Herbert said his job is being a cheerleader for the state: “Mainly, it is making people aware that if you invest in Utah, your chances of success are greater than elsewhere.”


Startup Festival and Startup Culture Taking Root in Modern Provo, Home to BYU and Google Fiber

Broadband's Impact, Fiber, Gigabit Networks, The Innovation Economy August 31st, 2015

Editor’s Note: This past week, Drew Clark’s column in the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, Utah, was on the “The zeitgeist of modern Provo: Jobs and a good quality of life.” Click here for links to all of his Deseret News columns.

PROVO — What do you get when you cross a thriving technology and startup community with what Gallup called “the best place to live in America“?


That’s the zeitgeist here in Utah County. It’ll be celebrated with a new technology, business and cultural event here, dubbed Startfest, beginning on Monday, Aug. 31.

And because of the still-coalescing cultural power of information and communications technologies, Utah as a whole is sending a message to the world: Citizens of a particular city or region are no longer necessarily forced to choose between quality of life and economic opportunity.


Watch the Webcast on ‘GigUtah: How Fiber Networks Are Transforming Utah’ and Tweet to #utahbreakfast

Broadband TV, Gigabit Networks April 24th, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY, April 24, 2015 – At 2 p.m. ET, please visit to watch the Utah Breakfast Club FREE WEBCAST “GigUtah: How Fiber Networks are Transforming Salt Lake City, Provo and Utah.”

Ask your questions via Twitter, using the hashtag #utahbreakfast.

Photographs and Biographies for ‘GigUtah: How Fiber Networks Are Transforming Salt Lake City, Provo and Utah’

Broadband's Impact, Gigabit Networks April 23rd, 2015

Speakers for the Utah Breakfast Club and Broadband Breakfast Club Event 'GigUtah' Speakers for the Utah Breakfast Club and Broadband Breakfast Club Event ‘GigUtah’

From left to right, top to bottom: Devin Baer, Brock Johansen, Paul Cutler, Justin Jones, Nole Walkinshaw, David Shaw

Utah and Broadband Breakfast Club Announce Luncheon Event and Webcast on Friday, April 24

Broadband's Impact, Expert Opinion, Gigabit Networks April 8th, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY, April 8, 2015 – The Utah Breakfast Club, in collaboration with the well-established Broadband Breakfast Club of Washington, D.C., on Wednesday announced a special luncheon event on Gigabit Networks in Utah that will take place on Friday, April 24, 2015.

The luncheon event will take place at the Utah State Capitol, in the regular location of the monthly Utah Breakfast Club. This event will also be viewable as a FREE LIVE WEBCAST beginning at 2 p.m. ET/1 p.m. CT/Noon MT/11 a.m. PT. Register for the FREE LIVE WEBCAST or to attend in person.

Those who seek to attend in person may register to attend this interactive discussion. Members of the Utah Breakfast Club pay $15, plus registration fee. Nonmembers pay $25, plus registration fee. (Individuals may obtain a NO CHARGE three month trial membership of the Utah Breakfast Club.) Lunch will be served at the Utah State Capitol beginning at 11:30 a.m. MT, with the program and webcast beginning promptly at 2 p.m. ET/Noon MT.

“Google’s decision to bring fiber to Salt Lake City adds the the strong base of fiber-optic deployment with Utah,” said Drew Clark, founder of the Utah Breakfast Club and the Broadband Breakfast Club. “With cities and states across the country now seeking to build Gigabit networks, this discussion about GigUtah will be of great interest throughout the nation.”

The panel discussion and FREE LIVE WEBCAST will explore these topics:

Google has captivated the enthusiasm of internet users — and the attention of economic development professionals — by offering Gigabit Network service in selected cities across the country.

In announcing in late March that Google Fiber will expand to Salt Lake City (its eighth metropolitan area nationwide), the broadband world turned its envying eyes on Utah. With Google Fiber in Provo and now Salt Lake — and with Gigabit Networks available in the 11 cities served by the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, or UTOPIA — Utah is poised to be the first state where a substantial portion of its residents have access to the fastest-possible broadband internet services.

What does Google’s investments say about the economic health and technology-savvy nature of Utah? What do cities and citizens get from Google Fiber that they haven’t gotten from traditional telecom companies? And, for cities and states seeking to get a Gig, what are the best options to build and enhance Gigabit Networks?

CONFIRMED Panelists:

Devin Baer, Head of Fiber Business, Salt Lake, Google
Paul Cutler, Mayor, City of Centerville, Utah
Justin Jones, Vice President, Public Policy and Communications, Salt Lake Chamber
David Shaw, Shareholder, Kirton McConkie; Chair, Government and Utilities Practice Group
Moderated by Drew Clark, Of Counsel, Kirton McConkie; Founder, Utah Breakfast Club
For questions about the event, please contact Drew Clark at


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