Better Broadband Better Lives

Tag archive

Motion Picture Association of America

Pallante Appointed Permanent Head of Copyright Office

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2011 - Librarian of Congress James Billington made permanent the appointment of Maria Pallante to the top post at the U.S. Copyright Office, where she has served as Acting Register of Copyrights since the beginning of the year. Pallante's appointment secures her spot as the successor of Marybeth Peters, who retired from the Copyright Office at the end of 2010 after 16 years of service. Keep Reading

Dodd Addresses Movie ‘Theft’ In First Speech as MPAA Chief

WASHINGTON, March 30, 2011 - Harkening to the days of the director, Cecil B. DeMille, CEO and Chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America, Chris Dodd, delivered his first talk as chief of the organization to theater owners in Las Vegas about the importance of preventing movie theft. Theft from individuals surreptitiously recording movies in theaters and distributing them either in hard copy or on the internet represents the greatest threat to one of the strongest sectors of the American economy, claimed the former Connecticut Senator. Keep Reading

Copyright/Intellectual Property

Internet’s Founding Architects: Latest U.S. Senate Effort To Block Online Pirates Will Instigate Internet Chaos

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18th, 2010 -- The U.S. Senate's latest battle plan against intellectual property piracy online could gain traction and be approved by the body's Judiciary Committee Thursday, but a large group of the internet's founding architects are warning that the plan's technical approach would wreak havoc and destabilize the global network. Keep Reading

Copyright/Uncategorized

Court Ruling Recasts Notion of Ownership of Books, Movies, Music, Software in Digital Age

SAN FRANCISCO, September 10, 2010 -- A federal appeals court ruling on Friday could eventually end the huge secondary market that has bloomed online in used books, software, and other forms of media both physical and digital when it said a software company can use its licenses to control the re-sale of their products. The panel of three judges for the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously decided that Autodesk's software license trumped the "first sale" doctrine encapsulated in federal law. This appears to give companies more leeway to license more of their products rather than simply selling them and giving up control. Keep Reading

Go to Top