Posts Tagged ‘Tim Wu’

Former Googler in Obama Administration at Cross-Hairs of Net Neutrality Debate

Net Neutrality November 25th, 2009

WASHINGTON, November 25, 2009 – The rhetoric surrounding whether the Federal Communications Commission should move forward with rules to regulate internet access to support the principle of network neutrality took on new legs this week when a government official – a former top policy official at Google – conflated net neutrality, free speech and anti-government censorship in the same discussion.

It comes at a time that the FCC has already moved away from the controversial term “network neutrality” to focus instead on the importance of ensuring that an “open internet” exists going forward.

White House Aide Says Broadband Is and Remains Obama Priority

Broadband Data, Broadband's Impact May 14th, 2009

WASHINGTON, May 14, 2009 – One of President Obama’s top technology and economic policy officials said Thursday that broadband infrastructure is and must remain a key priority of the Obama administration.

National Tech Policy: Which Way Forward?

Expert Opinion June 24th, 2008

NEW YORK, June 24 – The Personal Democracy Forum here featured a panel with some of the leading minds on technology policy. Moderator Andrew Rasiej wanted to know: “What would you do as part of a new administration to impact tech policy” on January 21, 2009?

Free Press, Google and Others Form Pro-Broadband Initiative

Broadband's Impact June 24th, 2008

NEW YORK, June 24 – A group of non-profits, businesses and other organizations seeking to guide the creation of a national broadband plan on Tuesday announced the formation of a new initiative, “Internet for Everyone,” seeking the highlight the crucial importance of broadband.

Photos from the Free Press Conference in Minneapolis

Expert Opinion June 7th, 2008

Photos from the National Conference for Media Reform in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Media Reform Now About Internet, Not Broadcast Ownership

Broadband's Impact June 6th, 2008

The Internet has opened up so many possibilities for communication that the most important concern about the media isn’t broadcasters, but cable and Bell companies, said Free Press.

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