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Broadband's Impact

Berkman Center at Harvard Launches Dashboard Aimed at Aggregating Broadband Data

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts, October 2, 2015 - The Berkman Center for Internet and Society here has launched an ambitious new dashboard designed  to provide a visualization of internet health and activity. The dashboard, which debuted at the World Economic Forum in Geneva on Monday, builds upon the prior collection of broadband data available through Internet Monitor, a project of Harvard Law School's Berkman Center. The dashboard is a tool for policymakers, researchers and users to understand, at a glance, various metrics pertaining to broadband access and use. Internet Monitor Dashboard [More...] Keep Reading

‘On the Internet, No One Knows You’re a Child’: The Short Life of Aaron Swartz, at Sundance

PARK CITY, Utah, January 23, 2014 - On the internet, no one knows you're a child. That, at least, was the message I took from watching the film about the life of Aaron Swartz. The film, "The Internet's Own Boy," premiered this week here at the Sundance Film Festival, during which it received a sustained standing ovation. The documentary is a biography of, and tribute to, the all-too-short life of Swartz, who died a year ago this month, at age 26. Swartz had been under intense pressure from the federal prosecutors in Massachusetts. Criminal charges filed against him, if proven, could have imprisoned him for 35 years. Those charges stemmed from Swartz's having downloaded millions of articles from JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, onto a computer at the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While it is unclear what Swartz intended to do with the articles, it seems implausible that he would have republished them in an act of copyright infringement. [...] Keep Reading

Measuring Broadband Use and Adoption is the Next Frontier in Internet Data Collection

SPRINGFIELD, Illinois, August 9, 2011 - It's very easy to take broadband for granted. People want to go online to look up answers on Wikipedia, to watch movies on Netflix, to hang out on Facebook, or to Skype cousins across the globe -- or across town. None of this can be done without broadband. Higher and higher speeds of internet connectivity are necessary to satisfy everyone's demand to do all of these things at once. That's where the Partnership for a Connected Illinois comes into play. Keep Reading

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