Posts Tagged ‘California broadband’

Kentucky Deploys State-Wide Fiber Network Through Public Private Partnership with Macquarie Capital

Broadband's Impact September 21st, 2015

LEXINGTON, Kentucky, September 21, 2015 – The lieutenant governor of Kentucky, a bevy of state officials and their private sector counterparts here celebrated the finalization of the deal to build a $324 million broadband infrastructure project.

The project, KentuckyWired, is a public-private partnership (also dubbed a PPP) of the state and of the Australian financier Macquarie Capital. It is a 3,400-mile open access “middle mile” network that will span all 120 counties in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

In planning, financing and negotiating stages for nearly a year, the Macquarie project closed on September 3, 2015. Bonds are set to be issued and construction of the network – albeit in very early phases – has begun.

When completed in 2018, the network will include six fiber rings around regions of the state, and fiber connections to at least one point in every county.

The Kentucky Wired network was the highlight and toast of each of four days at the Broadband Communities economic development conference here.

Kentucky Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen speaking at Broadband Communities conference in Lexington.

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Internet Innovation Alliance Strikes Positive Note About Broadband and Apps Economy in 2013

Broadband's Impact, Congress, Education, FCC, Health January 24th, 2013

WASHINGTON, January 24, 2013 – Broadband is about more than internet connection speeds, but now is everywhere, and affecting the way that consumers interacting with constantly-connected devices, according to a guide released by the Internet Innovation Alliance. The IIA guide highlights the usage of broadband connectivity in the advancement of distance learning in schools, as […]

FCC Workshop on Media Ownership: Picture Still Fuzzy

Copyright, FCC, FCC Workshops, Intellectual Property May 24th, 2010

STANFORD, Calif., May 25, 2010 — The digital television transition and the emergence of broadband networks have opened up intriguing new kinds of distribution channels for programming, but at a media ownership workshop held in Stanford late last week it was unclear how any of this affects the quality of local programming.

Eddy W. Hartenstein, publisher and CEO of the Los Angeles Times, several executives from media start-ups like set-top box maker Sezmi, internet radio programmer Pandora Media, low-power television station KAXT-CA and multi-platform rights management company FreeWheel Media, as well as several different independent analysts, participated in a Federal Communications Commission workshop on Friday that explored the question of how new media is affecting traditional forms of media.

In addition to trying to reach audiences through social media, broadcasters are also making new uses of the digital spectrum to provide new kinds of programming, and new ways to receive new forms of packaging of programming.

Sezmi, for example, enables consumers to receive free-over-the-air broadcasts along with a few select cable channels and internet video-programming all integrated through its set-top box. The service is currently being rolled out in Los Angeles, where consumers can buy the boxes at Best Buy.

Virginia Gov. McDonnell Signs Telemedicine Reimbursement Legislation

Broadband Updates, Broadband's Impact, National Broadband Plan April 21st, 2010

The Federal Communications Commission’s national broadband plan seeks to promote telemedicine, but the national health care bill recently-passed by Congress fails to include support for it. However, last week Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) signed SB 675, a health insurance bill that mandates coverage for telemedicine services.

The Journey of a Million Miles Begins With Basic Broadband Research

Broadband Data, Expert Opinion February 3rd, 2010

PHILADELPHIA, Penn., February 3, 2010 – Investment in broadband infrastructure, most believe, is essential to our nation’s future economic health.

In an information economy, the race is to the swift: those who can quickly access more, better information will innovate, communicate, and transact at a far greater rate than those who cannot. That’s how the argument goes. As our nation prepares to invest billions in broadband infrastructure, it appears that “We the People” have accepted that argument.

One nagging question remains: is the argument valid?

Rural Utilities Service Unveils $310 Million in Stimulus Funds for 14 Projects

Broadband Stimulus, Broadband Updates, Broadband's Impact, States January 26th, 2010

WASHINGTON, January 26, 2010 – The Agriculture Department’s Rural Utilities Service is doling out $310 million in broadband stimulus funds, department Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Monday.

The monies will be spread throughout 14 projects seeking to bring speedy Internet connections to rural communities in the United States in an effort to lift and grow their economies.

“The awards for these broadband projects will support anchor institutions – such as libraries, public buildings and community centers – that are necessary for the viability of rural communities,” Vilsack said.

Study: Broadband Providers Target Areas of Expected Economic Growth

Broadband Data, Broadband's Impact January 15th, 2010

WASHINGTON, January 15, 2010 – Researchers looking at California to determine whether broadband boosts local economic development found it’s tough to determine since broadband providers tend to target areas of expected high economic growth.

Commerce Sec. Locke Announces $7.5 Million in Broadband Grants to Los Angeles

Broadband Stimulus, Broadband's Impact January 13th, 2010

January 13, 2010 – Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, speaking Wednesday at the South Los Angeles WorkSource Center, announced the funding of a number of recovery projects, including $7.5 million to the city of Los Angeles for broadband. The grant will be used to expand Los Angeles’ computer access network.

New Leadership at National Association of Consumer Advocates for Utilities

Broadband Updates, Broadband's Impact November 19th, 2009

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – The National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates announced new leadership, which was elected at the group’s annual meeting from November 15 to 18 in Chicago. Mary Healey of Connecticut was elected president of the organization

Google Voice Controversy with AT&T Freshens Up Access Charges Battle

National Broadband Plan, Universal Service November 13th, 2009

WASHINGTON, November 13, 2009 – Access charges are well above the actual costs to connect telephone calls, despite the efforts made by the Federal Communications Commission, said Andy Regitsky of Regitsky and Associates, in a webinar presentation on “Access Charges and Network costs – A Guide to FCC Reform,” hosted by CCMI.

“The FCC is not ready to give control over access charges which have been flawed for the 25 years of their existence,” said Regitsky.

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